Large Estate Left To Wife

Father of Attorney W.S. Casterlin Made Money as a Farmer

One will was filed yesterday in the office of the register of wills, disposing of a large estate consisting of several thousands of dollars of real estate, while letters of administration were issued in another which was of much smaller value.

According to the will of Asa Casterlin, who died on July 30 at his home at Franklin township, all of the estate, both real and personal, is left to his wife, Mary Casterlin. She is to have the full use of the estate so long as she remains unmarried.

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Death At Orange

Asa Casterline, a Former West Pittston Resident, Passed Away Yesterday Afternoon.

Asa Casterline, one of the most respected and esteemed residents of Orange, passed away at his home yesterday afternoon about 1 o’clock after a long illness of dropsy and complications. Mr. Casterline was formerly a resident of this town, where he followed his occupation as a wagon maker, but for the past 30 years had been engaged in farming at Orange. He had been ailing for the past two years, but had been seriously ill only a few days. The deceased was about 60 years of age and was a member of Gohonta lodge, I.O.O.F., of this place, and a very close friend of the late Thomas Lance. Surviving him are his wife, Mary, and two sons—Walter, a prominent Wilkesbarre [sic] attorney, and Franklin, who resides with this parents; also two brothers, John, of Scranton, and Joseph, of Orange, and one sister, Mrs. Alvin Holmes, of Montgomery street. The funeral services will be conducted at the family home at Orange at 2 o’clock tomorrow afternoon. Interment will be made in Eaton cemetery.

Source: Pittston Gazette, July 31, 1906.

Short News Items from 1905

Miss Lillie Doty, of Talmadge Hill spent Saturday and Sunday with her aunt, Mrs. R.T. Shipman. (Van Ettenville Valley Breeze, May 11, 1905)

W.R. Rorick, of Sadler, Huddleston & Co., East Buffalo, N.Y., was also with us yesterday and met many old friends and associates. (Detroit Free Press, May 12, 1905)

Charley Armstrong is the champion wolf killer of this region. A few days ago he brought in seven of them. (Algona Advance, June 22, 1905)

Business & Professional Notices from 1905

Wanted—Situation as a carpenter; references furnished. Leon J. Furman, R.F.D. No. 1, Clayton. 2-27-6. (Adrian Daily Telegram, March 3, 1905)

Reiner Bros. of Warsaw, Ind., who purchased the Queen tile mill about one year ago, has sold the same to Rorick & Sweeney of Gar Creek. We hope the new managers meet with success. (Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, September 17, 1905)

The request of Orange S. Pomeroy of Oregon for an extension of time in which to make settlement for his entry in the Twin Falls tract, under the Carey act, was granted by the board. (Idaho Statesman, September 29, 1905)

Short News Items from 1904

Charley Armstrong is up from Irvington today with the carcass of a large wolf which he trapped and secured. (Algona Advance, January 14, 1904)

Homer Drumm, who have [sic] been sick with lagrippe, is able to be out again. (Zanesville Times-Recorder, February 4, 1904)

Tracy Walling came up from Portland last night to attend the funeral of his brother, Fred Walling, at Zena this afternoon. (Salem Capital Journal, February 24, 1904)

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Business & Professional Notices from 1904

War Department order: Recruit Milan A. Loosley of the general service, now at Dallas, Tex., is transferred to the signal corps at Benecia Barracks, Cal. (San Francisco Call, March 12, 1904)

Amos Mauchmar, who has been employed as night operator at the union depot during the past two months, left Thursday for his home in Wayland, the night office being closed for the season. (Alma Record, April 22, 1904)

Reynolds & Marshall this week purchased half a lot from Otto Walling near the St. John Hardware Company building, and will their harness shop there as soon as their new building is finished. (Colfax Gazette, May 27, 1904)

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Rev. M.D. Fuller, D.D.

Rev. M.D. Fuller, D.D., who is now serving his fifth year as pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Jermyn, was born near Deckertown, N.J. After a preparatory education in the public schools there he entered Milford Academy at Milford, this State, and afterwards became a student in a private school in Warren county, New Jersey.

At about this time the Civil War broke out, and though he was only 16 years of age in 1861, left school to enlist in the Union army, from which he was honorably discharged on July 12, 1865, after four years of distinguished services as a member of the late Governor Henry M. Hoyt’s Fifty-second Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers. He distinguished himself in the siege of Charlestown, South Carolina, where for months his regiment was under fire from the Southern troops. For his bravery in this siege he was promoted to the rank of sergeant, an office which he held at the time of his discharge.

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Thumb Nail Sketches

No. 33 Judge E.S.B. Sutton

Judge E.S.B. Sutton is known as the small man who smokes large cigars. Mr. Sutton knows a good cigar when he sees it, and insists on smoking the best Havanas local dealers keep in stock. The judge doesn’t own any stock in the Standard Oil company, but when he puts a fresh cigar in his mouth, tips back in his chair and rests his feet on his desk, he takes about as much comfort as any man in the country.

Mr. Sutton was born in famous Oakland county, where they grow gubernatorial candidates and cucumber pickles. When but a small lad he learned how to “look wise,” followed this up with a law course and thus developed into a full fledged lawyer. He came to the Soo many years ago and by steady work has risen to a high position in legal circles.

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Short News Items from 1903

Albert Holbein, of Perry street, has removed to the Henry Munson place near Ellis station. (Zanesville Times Recorder, February 25, 1903)

Lorin Walling has been sorely afflicted with inflammatory rheumatism. (Polk County Itemizer, July 3, 1903)

Mr. T.R. Kelly, wife and boy have been spending a generous portion of the hot weather in the canyon, literally wallowing in the delights of nature. (Springville Independent, August 6, 1903)

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Business and Professional Notices from 1903

T.R. Kelly, has opened a wall paper and paint room in connection with his drug store, which contains a large and excellent stock of paper in the newest designs, and paint of every shade and color, and the best in the market. (Springville Independent, April 23, 1903)

SPRAYING CASE.—The case against Enos Walling, who was charged by the deputy horticultural inspector with failing to spray his trees, was yesterday dismissed in the probate court, as Mr. Walling is now spraying his trees and that is all the authorities desire.  (Idaho Statesman, May 9, 1903)

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