Capt. W.C. Tyrrell Will Be Buried Here Probably Wednesday

His Benefactions and How He Made Fortune Recalled; Brought First Ship to Beaumont

Funeral services for Capt. W.C. Tyrrell, prominent citizen and philanthropist, who died at his residence at 1347 Calder avenue early Sunday morning, probably will be held Wednesday afternoon, according to tentative arrangements. It is likely that the Masonic lodge will have charge of services at the grave.

The body was prepared for burial yesterday and lay in state at the family residence throughout the day where it was viewed by hundreds of friends and associates of the deceased.

It is believed that Captain Tyrrell’s death occurred about 12:45 a.m. and that his death, which was caused by heart failure, was peaceful and without suffering. He was found by his son-in-law, Dr. J.W. Garth, at 1:15 a.m. and it was evident at that time that he had been dead about half an hour.

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Tyrrell Family Has Reunion At Lakes

W.C. Tyrrell of Beaumont, Texas, and some twenty or thirty of his relatives, among them C.H. Tyrrell, Jr., and family and Dr. and Mrs. C.A. Fillgraf of Spencer, are enjoying a most delightful family reunion in cottages rented for the purpose near the drawbridge on West Okoboji lake in Iowa, says a Belmond paper. W.C. Tyrrell, whom his intimate friends call “Captain,” is staging the party and is renting the Pattee cottage for the month of the July and the gathering is making its headquarters there. Every known form of enjoyment the lakes afford are indulged in by the guests. There is golf for those who like and W.C. Tyrrell does. He took up the game at the age of 63 and now shoots most of the courses in less than a hundred. Dancing, swimming, boating, motoring and other forms of amusement, to say nothing of wonderful eats, help to cause the time to pass all too quickly.

Those in the party in addition to W.C. Tyrrell are: Dr. M. Brink and wife of Boyde, Iowa, G.P. Tyrrell and wife of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, C.H. Tyrrell and wife of Sioux Rapids, Dr. G.W. [sic] Garth and wife of Beaumont, Texas, David Rorick and family of Ocean Side [sic], California, Thomas Garth and wife of Beaumont, Texas, J.W. Garth, Jr., who drove through from Tulsa, Oklahoma, Clifford Fields of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Will C. Tyrrell, Jr., president of a sugar company at Belmond, Iowa, and his son, Will C. Tyrrell III, and daughter Carol, and C.H. Tyrrell, Jr., and Dr. and Mrs. C.A. Fillgraf of Spencer. W.C. Tyrrell, host to the party, is one of the big boosters for Texas. He has been engaged in the oil business for a number of years.

Source: Beaumont Enterprise, July 23, 1923.

Tyrrell Garth Weds Los Angeles Girl; Will Reside Here

That Miss Lucy Langdon of Los Angeles and Tyrrell Garth of this city, son of Dr. and Mrs. J.W. Garth and grandson of Capt. W.C. Tyrrell, were united in marriage December 26 is the news reaching Beaumont, where the groom’s family is prominently identified.

The wedding was solemnized at the bride’s home and among other relatives presents were Capt. Tyrrell and Mrs. Garth.

Mr. and Mrs. Garth are now at the Hotel Maryland, Pasadena, where they plan an extended stay.

Mr. Garth is connected with the Tyrrell-Combest company and has many friends here who will give his bride a cordial welcome, she being pleasantly remembered as a visitor in the Garth home about a year ago when she accompanied her grandfather to Beaumont, he being an old-time Iowa friend of Capt. Tyrrell’s.

Source:  Beaumont Enterprise, January 2, 1922.

Short News Items from 1920

Kenneth Gunton, of No. 2 Ransom, was admitted to the Pittstown Hospital yesterday for treatment. (Wilkes-Barre Record, January 28, 1920)

Mrs. Mary A. Huff and son, Mahlon Huff of Wysox spent Wednesday with her daughter, Mrs. George Parks. (Sayre Evening Times, April 17, 1920)

Mrs. George Parks was hastily summoned to Wysox Saturday morning by the death of her mother, Mrs. Mary Huff, the unfortunate lady who was killed by the cars at that place, Saturday morning. (Sayre Evening Times, July 14, 1920)

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Guests at Tyrrell Home.

The W.C. Tyrrell home, 1347 Calder, is the scene of a pleasant family gathering, Capt. Tyrrell’s sons and daughters and grand-children coming from far and near to Beaumont to help him celebrate his 73rd birthday anniversary, which occurred Saturday. Present are: W.C. Tyrrell of Belmond, Ia.; H.C. Tyrrell of Tulsa; Mr. and Mrs. David Rorick of Oceanside, Cal.; Dr. and Mrs. M. Brink of Boyden, Iowa; Mr. and Mrs. D.H. Leonard of Clarion, Iowa, Clifford Field of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and Dr. and Mrs. J.W. Garth.

Source: Beaumont Enterprise, January 19, 1920.

Short News Items from 1918

Cecil Low, Garner Lundy and Ira Orem will leave Thursday to take their entrance examinations for the United States navy. Low has previously been in the cavalry, but was discharged, owing to illness, and will now enter the naval service. (Klamath Falls Evening Herald, May 15, 1918)

Walter Domrose, Roland Stricker and Orla [sic] Tilley have all been listed in the next draft and are expecting notification any day. All are employed in the harvest fields and had hoped to be left till the crops were in. (Twin Falls News, June 19, 1918)

HALLSTEAD, Pa., Aug. 29.—Rev. James Bryden, of Dorranceton, Pa., is spending his vacation at the home of his son, Rev. Lewis Bryden, of Pine street.  (Scranton Republican, August 30, 1918)

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Short News Items from 1915

T.E. Mackrell, superintendent of the C. & E., division will return Friday morning with the family on Erie train No. 7 from Warwick, N.Y., where his daughter, Miss Helen Mackrell, was buried. (Huntington Herald, January 7, 1915)

George Strickland, assistant cashier of the First National bank, left last evening for Minneapolis where he will spend today on business. (Bemidji Daily Pioneer, January 18, 1915)

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Business & Professional Notices from 1913

LITTLE INTEREST IN U.S. PAPERS: August Donath, superintendent of documents in the government printing office, last night, before the District of Columbia Library Association, deplored the little interest taken in United States papers by some educational institutions, and spoke of the need of new methods of distribution. Robert A. Church, of the Navy Department, spoke on “Ship Libraries of the United States Navy.” Alton P. Tisdel, Dr. Henry J. Harris, George F. Bowerman, and Willard O. Waters also spoke. (Washington Post, January 16, 1913)

C.A. McGrew came down from Wagner Butte, where he has a quartz came, recently, and he is showing some samples of ore that look pretty good. There shows up quite a sprinkling of tulurian and other metals, while the assay of some pieces shows as high as $300 a ton. (Ashland Tidings, February 20, 1913)

Clarion — The biggest real estate deal ever made in the history of Wright county was made last week when W.C. Tyrrell and his son exchanged farms. The son owned a large farm near Latimer and the father, well known throughout the county and state, owned a farm of nearly 2,000 acres two miles south of Belmont [sic]. They traded farms, the value of the latter farm near Belmond being placed at $80,000. (Correctionville News, February 6, 1913)

Tyrrell Will Build Theater In Gate City

Beaumont Capitalist Has Acquired Considerable Property In Port Arthur

Port Arthur, Tex., Aug. 19.—Captain Tyrrell of Beaumont was in the city Wednesday and made a purchase of another lot adjoining the two lots on which he intended building a vaudeville theater. This gives him seventy-five feet frontage and he will erect a two-story brick 75×140 feet. The lower story will be used for business and an up-to-date vaudeville theater and pool room. Captain Tyrrell owns much valuable property in this city and it is all a paying asset, getting good rentals from his buildings. Last week he purchased the J.F. Winn home as a home for some of his family. Captain Tyrrell has plans for other buildings to go up in the near future, one of which is a large three-story rooming house constructed on up-to-date plans. This is a much-needed acquisition and will lead to building others.

Source: Beaumont Journal, August 19, 1910.

Short News Items from 1904

Charley Armstrong is up from Irvington today with the carcass of a large wolf which he trapped and secured. (Algona Advance, January 14, 1904)

Homer Drumm, who have [sic] been sick with lagrippe, is able to be out again. (Zanesville Times-Recorder, February 4, 1904)

Tracy Walling came up from Portland last night to attend the funeral of his brother, Fred Walling, at Zena this afternoon. (Salem Capital Journal, February 24, 1904)

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