Well Known Morenci Resident Passes Away

Mark C. Rorick, older son of Cosper and Nancy A. Breese Rorick, was born on a farm in Seneca township, Michigan Dec. 7, 1845 and died Feb. 6, 1922. His brother Leroy W. was born Sept. 14, 1847. He lived with his parents in a log house until the brick house was built in ’68. Cosper Rorick, father of M.C. Rorick, had a small clearing 3-4 mile north of what is now Seneca village, woods being on all sides. Canandaigua was the nearest post office and trading point combined and traveling was accomplished entirely by ox team or by horse back. The nearest church was at Medina, seven miles distant, and this they attended every Sunday morning. It was necessary to make an early start as they drove an ox team and wagon with a board across the wagon box for the little boys.

When about five years of age “Mark” commenced school in the home district 2 1/2 miles way in the Rorick district today. He walked back and forth to school. When the Tufts school house was being built he attended school in a part of the James Lord home, temporarily.

A part of the home farm was deeded for school purposes and the new building was considered adequate for that time. One feature differing from today was the interior arrangement by which the boys and girls sat facing one another. Then he attended school in Canandaigua and later at Medina Academy for one year, where he and his brother boarded themselves.

Adrian was the center of trade for the county at that time and they planned to make the return trip in a day to that point when taking produce, which made a long hard day.

About this time he met the girl of his choice, Mary S. Porter, who was attending Medina Academy. They were married at the parsonage in Medina by Rev. Boyington, Aug. 9, 1868, which was a surprise to their near relatives, as a triple wedding had been under consideration to include Estell H. Rorick and S.K. Porter, who were married the 20th of the same month.

Mr. and Mrs. Rorick lived for one year with his parents in the brick house when they bought 40 acres adjoining on the south and moved into a log house, where they spent one winter and two summers. While the log house was a shelter it would not seem livable to the young folks of today, being of one room with a loft overhead. The windows were stationary and of six small panes.

With great resourcefulness the lack of a clock was overcome by the ingenious device of drawing a line at a certain angle on the doorstep so on a sunny day the young housewife cold tell when to start preparations for dinner. On account of the discomforts of winter the young couple moved back with the parents into the commodious brick house. They sold their forty acres, bought forty of Mr. Rorick’s father and added more to it until there were the 185 acres now owned by John P. Rorick. They remained here until they came to Morenci twenty-seven years ago.

In 1870 the Wabash railroad was built through Seneca and a little village sprang up, including a post office and church. Soon they felt the need of a new church and Mr. Rorick was, with others, successful in soliciting funds for a new building.

Their home was always open to traveling ministers, school masters, singing teachers, or whoever came to the little church for special occasions. It was always a great satisfaction to Mr. Rorick to be able to entertain his friends in his home and to act as host at his bountiful table. His hospitality was unquestioned. Later this church burned to the ground and Mr. Rorick contributed liberally toward a new one, and before this was completed it was struck by lightning and again burned down, to all of which he helped materially.

For many years he was school director and was always interested in anything pertaining to the public good. He was ambitious and unusually strong. He cleared a large amount of land with the ox team. A singular coincidence may be mentioned in that M.C. Rorick and his brother Leroy married sisters, lived in close relationship on adjoining farms and each had a son born on the same day.

The father, Cosper Rorick, died in 1874. To Mr. and Mrs. Rorick were born three children, John Porter, Myrtie, wife of E.N. Baldwin of Fayette, O., and Maude, who died at the age of fourteen.

Mr. Rorick was one of the first dairy farmers in the county, sending his milk to the Horton cheese factory. He took great interest in the county fair, acting as judge for several years, also in the three town Pioneer picnic, which was held annually in a grove near Seneca.

His heart was always with the farmer and his problems, which he solved by himself by hard work, good business judgment and strictest economy. All through his life in Morenci his love remained for the old home on the farm, which though the early years were full of hardship was sacred with the memories of home life.

After coming to Morenci Mr. Rorick entered the retail grocery and meat business, also wool and stock buying. Her purchased at different times more farms which he improved and cultivated.

He joined the Knights of Pythias order as charter member, and has been one of the most loyal, active members to the time of his death.

He had a gift of being able to rise and represent the order, whether at home or in the lodge room of a neighboring town, in a very pleasing manner. His mother’s death occurred in 1912 and the brother Leroy in 1917. The brothers loved each other with a deep loyalty, in fact love of family was a strong characteristic of the deceased.

For many years the Rorick family reunion was an annual event of importance and his home was always ready for the gathering if needed. Mr. and Mrs. Rorick celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary some three years ago. One of the greatest problems before the American people today would be solved if the example of their home life could be more closely imitated. The question comes to one’s mind, with their advantages of education and means, the younger men and women of today will take up the work of the passing generation and apply to it the same amount of ambition and courage. If so what wonderful things may be accomplished.

There remain thirteen grandchildren who have a splendid heritage of honesty, thrift, integrity, loyalty and ambition. Mr. Rorick was strong in the principles he believed to be right, a strong advocate of temperance, staunch member of the Democratic party, always interested in matters of public interest with careful, prompt attention to detail of the management of his farms, which would mean success in any business enterprise. He possessed an unusually social nature and many friends will miss his face at the window, as he would wave a friendly hand to passersby and welcome calls from his physician and friends.

The grandchildren even to the youngest, will never forget the welcome always awaiting them at grandfather’s home.

In the passing of Mr. Rorick the last of the double cousins to bear the Rorick name, descendants of the three Rorick brothers who married three Breese sisters, has gone. But the closing of a well ordered and well spent life bears out the prophecy of Job,

Thou shalt come to thy grave in a full age,
like a shock of corn cometh in his season.

The funeral service was held at 2 o’clock, Wednesday, at the home on Main Street and was conducted by Rev. H.A. Manahn and Judge B.L. Hart. The remains were laid to rest in Oak Grove Cemetery. The pall bearers were John Poucher, C.F. Buck, Oliver Onweller, A.A. Kennedy, Ed. Gallup and Tom Snow.

Those from out of town who were in attendance at the funeral were E.N. Baldwin of Fayette, Mrs. W.D. Murphy of Columbus, John Cole of Weston, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Crane, John Rorick and F.T. Sullivan of Fayette, A.V. Foster of Toledo, Mr. and Mrs. George Horton of Fruit Ridge, E.B. Root of Adrian, Judge and Mrs. B.L. Hart of Adrian, Melvin McCloe of Detroit, Mr. and Mrs. James Scott and Mrs. Carl Guss of Medina, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Porter of Weston and Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Moore of Canandaigua.

Source:  Lundahl, Helen Rorick.  (n.d.) The Rorick Family in America.  (NB: This manuscript is held in the Toledo-Lucas County Library and contains a number of transcriptions of undated newspaper clippings.)

Death Strikes Attendant in Church Aisle

Wedding Continues at Port Jervis

Port Jervis — Miss [unclear] Cooper, twenty-[unclear] years old, wife of Stanley Cooper of eleven [unclear] avenue, walked solemnly down the middle aisle of St. Peter’s Lutheran here yesterday afternoon, a bridal attendant in the wedding of her friend A. Marian Van Sickle to Wallace Edgar Moore. The organist was playing the wedding march. Halfway down the aisle Mrs. Cooper collapsed in the arms of a bridesmaid, Miss Wilma Davidson.

Two men removed Mrs. Cooper to the basement of the church. She apparently had fainted. Dr. Hugh M. Brewster, city health officer, summoned from City Hall across the street pronounced her death [unclear] of a heart attack. Upstairs the wedding went on, with all concerned unaware of the fatal outcome

Then for an hour and a half, her father, husband, other relatives and more than a hundred persons stood outside the church, waiting anxiously, powerless to help, while a Rockland Power & Light pulmotor squad work feverishly but fruitlessly to bring life back into the body of Mrs. Cooper. The excitement of the wedding had apparently been too much for her. She had suffered heart attacks in the past but during the last few weeks had felt as her husband said later “best in a long time”. Mrs. Cooper’s body was removed to the Gray funeral home.

Meanwhile, Miss Van Sickle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Sickle of four East Main street, had been united in marriage to Wallace Edgar Moore, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Moore of 233 East Main street. The Rev. H.C. Meyer, past of St. Paul’s, performed the ceremony.

Gowned in white marquisette and lace over white satin, a long white tulle veil, a long train with pear tiara and carrying an arm bouquet of white sweet peas and white snap dragons, the bride was given in marriage by her father.

The maid of honor, Miss Alice Van Sickle, work a pink brocaded marquisette floor-length gown and blue and pink sweat peas. The best man was Frederick Van Sickle, a brother of the bride.

Ushers were Harold and Raymond Doss, Clarence King and Clarence Edwards, all of Port Jervis. Miss Marietta Mori was organist and Mrs. Harrison Waits sang Because and I Love You Truly during the ceremony. The archway [unclear] the altar was was covered with sweet peas and palms and the altar was covered with flowers.

After the wedding a reception was held at the home of the bride’s parents with about seventy-five in attendance. Guests from out of town came from Long Island, Stony Point, Rutherford, New Jersey, Newton, New Jersey, Jeffersonville, Godeffroy, Long Eddy, Glen Rock, New Jersey, and Rio.

After a brief wedding trip the couple will reside in their newly-furnished home in Arlington, New Jersey where the bridegroom is employed by the Western Electric Company.

Funeral Wednesday

Funeral services for Mrs. Cooper will be held Wednesday morning at ten o’clock at the residence and at 10:30 in St. Mary’s Church. Interment will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery.

Mrs. Cooper was born in Matamoras November nineteenth, 1917, a daughter of Charles J. and Adeline [unclear] Theodore. Her mother died in 1927. She married July nineteenth, 1936 to Stanley D. Cooper of Port Jervis.

Mrs. Cooper, who was graduated from Port Jervis High School in 1936, was a member of St. Mary’s Church, the Catholic Daughters of America and Alpha Psi sorority.

Besides her husband, she leaves her father; her stepmother Mrs. Anna May Theodore; a brother, Charles; two sisters, Anna May at home, and Thelma, wife of James Clifford of Port Jervis; a stepbrother, Joseph Lehn; two stepsisters, Mrs. Mary Ellen Paffenroth and Mrs. Mildred Mayfield; and her grandmother, Mrs. Augusta Theodore;

Source: Middletown Times-Herald, March 3, 1941. (NB: The microfilm was very difficult to read.)

Jacob T. Rorick

Some two hundred years ago and about forty years before the Declaration of Independence, the first Jacob T. Rorick landed in America and settled on the river that bears the name of his fellow countryman, Henrich Hudson. This first Jacob T. Rorick was the great-grandfather of Jacob Thompson Rorick, of The Dalles. The latter’s parents were Mark and Ann E. (Moore) Rorick, who were natives of New Jersey, and in that state he was born in 1853. His grandmother Moore was an aunt of Rev. John Russell, who was a candidate of the prohibition party for president.

Mr. Rorick was educated in the district schools of Michigan, where he was sent on the death of his parents to live with an uncle. Later he entered the Oak Grove Academy, after which he taught school for a time, in the meanwhile taking a course at the State Normal School at Ypsilanti. He then began the study of law and took a law course at Michigan State University. For some reason, he abandoned the practice of law and turned his attention to the newspaper business, becoming the editor of the Bad Axe Democrat, which he conducted for eight years, and during this time he was appointed the postmaster of Bad Axe, Michigan, by President Cleveland, serving in that office for four years.

It was in 1892 that Mr. Rorick came to Oregon, locating at Grand Haven on the opposite side of the river from The Dalles. There he secured twenty-three hundred acres of land and of this he still owns thirteen hundred acres. He also has one hundred and eighty acres in Benton county, Washington, under ditch, devoted to fruit and alfalfa. He has given much attention to cattle raising and was one of the organizers of the Castle Rock Land Association. While in the cattle business, Mr. Rorick always believed in full-blooded sires and his Durham bulls were all of registered stock. Closing out his cattle business, he took up dairying and used only Jerseys, again adhering to registered sires. Since 1909 he has practically retired from active connection with farm work.

Mr. Rorick has always evinced an interest in public affairs, though in no sense is he a politician. He has served on the school board; was twice candidate for mayor of The Dalles; and for eight years served as one of the city water commissioners. He served as director of The Dalles Chamber of Commerce from 1915 to 1917, when he was elected president of that body, occupying that office until 1919. He is vice-president of the Oregon State Champer of Commerce, and one of the five eastern Oregon directors of that important organization. He has been a Mason for forty-six years, and a Knight Templar for twenty-eight years. He has held all of the chairs in the blue lodge and is a Noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine.

In 1881 Mr. Rorick was married to Miss Carrie E. Eldridge, whose great-grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. She is a daughter of Rev. H.P. Eldridge, a Baptist clergyman of the middle west, who left his pulpit and fought gallantly with the Federal army during the Civil war. The living children of Mr. and Mrs. Rorick are: Mark, who is a chief yeoman in the United States Navy; Faye, wife of Clifton Condon, of The Dalles; Jay T., Jr., and E.H., a supercargo in the service of the United States Shipping Board. There are eight grandchildren, two of whom, Jay T., 3rd, and Elizabeth, they are rearing.

Source: Carey, Charles Henry. 1922. History of Oregon. Volume 3. Chicago: Pioneer Historical Publishing Company.

Jacob T. Rorick

Jacob T. Rorick, editor and proprietor of the Bad Axe Democrat, published at Bad Axe, Mich., was born in the State of New Jersey, Feb. 9, 1853; he is a son of Mark and Ann E. (Moore) Rorick, the former of German-English extraction, the latter of Irish descent, and both natives of New Jersey, where they lived and died.

The subject of this sketch attended school the first 15 years of his life; he was then engaged in working on a farm by the month for a period of seven years, after which he engaged in teaching school, some 14 terms, in the country; he then became Principal of the Schools at Canandaigua, Mich., for three terms, then acted as Principal of the Schools at Fayette, Ohio. He emigrated to Michigan in the year 1867, having been engaged for a short time previously as clerk in a grocery store. Several years since, he was engaged for a time in dealing in produce, with a fair degree of success. He came to Bad Axe in July, 1884, and purchased the press from William T. Hutchinson and entered immediately upon the duties of publishing a paper known as the Bad Axe Democrat, which he has continued up to the present time, a more extended sketch of which will be found elsewhere in this work.

Mr. Rorick was married in Lenawee Co., Mich., April 16, 1881, to Carrie Eldridge, daughter of the Rev. H.P. and Sarah (Averill) Eldridge; she was born in New York, Feb. 4, 1858. They have by this union one child, Mark Eldridge, born Feb. 1, 1884. Mr. Rorick is a member of the Order of Freemasons, belonging to Lodge No. 173, Medina, Lenawee Co., Mich. In political faith Mr. Rorick is, as the title of his paper would seem to indicate, a Democrat of strong type. He holds to the principles of no compromise with wrong, but to hew to the line and let the chips fall where they may. On the subject of religion he is a freethinker.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Album of Huron County Containing Portraits and Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens of the County. 1884. Chicago: Chapman Brothers.

A Sad Death

Mrs. F.E. Bryant Taken From Loved Ones

One of the saddest deaths we have been called upon to record was that of Mrs. Frank E. Bryant of Seneca, who was called from her beloved family last Monday afternoon. Expressions of regret at the death of beautiful and useful life in the prime of womanhood were heard everywhere in the community. She had been ill only two weeks and her condition was not considered serious until a few days before her demise. Sad indeed was the taking away to the loving husband and children who still need the care and devotion of a mother’s heart. To her father, Jacob Rorick, and her grandmother, Mrs. Caroline Sayres, who is still young at the advanced age of 91, the loss of her companionship is a sad affliction. In fact, all her many friends and relatives mourn her early departure.

Kate B. Rorick, daughter of Jacob and Mary Rorick, was born in Canandaigua, Mich., January 9, 1872, and at the time of her death, October 24, 1910, was aged 38 years, 9 months, and 15 days. She was united in marriage to Frank E. Bryant September 7, 1893, and to this union were born five children, two sons, John and Jacob, dying in early childhood. The three surviving children are Mary L., Florence S., and Gerald, ranging in age from 12 to 16 years. During her life, she was a devoted daughter, wife and mother.

Besides the mourning husband, children, father and grandmother, the latter two in later years making their home with her, she leaves one brother, William R. Rorick of Buffalo, and two sisters: Mrs. Mel McCloe of Detroit and Mrs. Carl Guss of Medina, besides a host of friends and relatives.

The funeral, which was one of the largest in attendance the county has seen in recent years, was held on Wednesday afternoon, Rev. Henry Coates officiating. Appropriate songs were rendered by Miss Susan Furman and Mrs. Ed. Moore, with Miss Flossie Allen accompanist. The bearers were composed of relatives and near friends, who tenderly carried the remains to their last resting place. The floral tributes were beautiful and numerous and attested the loving esteem in which the departed was held.

Among those attending from a distance were Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Rorick of Buffalo, N.Y.; Dr. and Mrs. E.H. Rorick and daughter, Mrs. Fred Sullivan, and Mrs. G.H. Crane of Fayette; Mr. and Mrs. Mel McCloe and daughter, Mertie, and Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Sloan of Detroit; Mrs. Hervey Spencer and Mrs. Howland of Birmingham, Mich.; Mr. and Mrs. W.C. McConnell, Mr. and Mrs. Clark E. Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs. Chas Ream and Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Vedder of Adrian; Mr. and Mrs. John Rorick and Mr. and Mrs. Will Gorsuch of Wauseon.

Source: Undated newspaper clipping in the possession of Mike Meister.