Death At Orange

Asa Casterline, a Former West Pittston Resident, Passed Away Yesterday Afternoon.

Asa Casterline, one of the most respected and esteemed residents of Orange, passed away at his home yesterday afternoon about 1 o’clock after a long illness of dropsy and complications. Mr. Casterline was formerly a resident of this town, where he followed his occupation as a wagon maker, but for the past 30 years had been engaged in farming at Orange. He had been ailing for the past two years, but had been seriously ill only a few days. The deceased was about 60 years of age and was a member of Gohonta lodge, I.O.O.F., of this place, and a very close friend of the late Thomas Lance. Surviving him are his wife, Mary, and two sons—Walter, a prominent Wilkesbarre [sic] attorney, and Franklin, who resides with this parents; also two brothers, John, of Scranton, and Joseph, of Orange, and one sister, Mrs. Alvin Holmes, of Montgomery street. The funeral services will be conducted at the family home at Orange at 2 o’clock tomorrow afternoon. Interment will be made in Eaton cemetery.

Source: Pittston Gazette, July 31, 1906.

Advertisements

Mrs. Chandler Williams

Another of the older residents of West Pittston passed away this morning about 5 o’clock, when death clamed Mrs. Chandler Williams, of Exeter street. Mrs. Williams had been quite seriously ill for several weeks and her death was not totally unexpected. Stomach trouble was the direct cause of death. The deceased was, previous to her marriage, a daughter of James Casterline, who came to this part of the country from Frankfort, N.J., many years ago, being one of the earliest settlers. She was aged 70 years and 6 months, most of which time had been passed in this locality, she having resided at Orange. She had been a life-long member of the M.E. church. The funeral will take place Monday afternoon from the family home at 2 o’clock. Two children survive.

Source: Pittston Gazette, March 1, 1902.

Mrs. Eliza Casterline

The debt of nature was yesterday paid by Mrs. Eliza Casterline of West Pittston, after an illness that had confined her to her bed for about a year. She resided with her daughter, Mrs. Alvin Holmes. Mrs. Casterline had passed the allotted years of life, being 91 years of age, having been born in Sussex County, N.J., in 1810. from her birthplace she removed to Orange, in this county, and about twenty years ago came to Pittston, where she had since resided. In her younger years she was active and popular among her friends. She was the widow of the late James Casterline and is survived by five children—John of Scranton, Joseph and Asa of Orange and Mrs. Alvin Holmes and Mrs. C.H. Williams of West Pittston. The funeral will occur on Friday from the home of her daughter, Mrs. Alvin Holmes of Montgomery street. The funeral will be private. Interment will be in Eaton cemetery.

Source: Wilkes-Barre Semi-Weekly Record, October 18, 1901.

Mrs. Eliza Casterlin

Another old resident passed away this morning, when death claimed Mrs. Eliza Casterlin, of West Pittston, at the ripe old age of 91 years. She had been confined to her bed ever since last Thanksgiving, and her death was not totally unexpected. While her mind has been enfeebled for some time past, she yesterday rallied and informed her daughter, Mrs. Alvin Holmes, that she would not remain with them much longer and that she wanted all of her children called to her bedside. Deceased was born in Sussex county, New Jersey, in 1810, and later moved to Orange, Pa., where she resided until about twenty years ago, when she came to West Pittston. She was the widow of the late James Casterlin, and is survived by five children, John, of Scranton; Joseph and Asa, of Orange, and two daughters, Mrs. Alvin Holmes and Mrs. C.H. Williams, of this place. The funeral will occur Friday morning from the home of her daughter, Mrs. Alvin Holmes, at the corner of Montgomery and Fourth streets, and will be private. Interment will be made in the Eaton burying ground, near Orange.

Source: Pittston Gazette, October 16, 1901.

Short News Items from 1898

TO KLONDIKE—A rumor comes over from Oxford Mills that a party of six will soon start from there for the gold fields of Alaska. The party will consist of V.O. Hammond, well known here; D.D. Rorick, an attorney at Oxford Junction; David and John Rorick, who come from near St. Louis, and Dr. Strevell and son. They are making preparations now to start. (Anamosa Eureka, January 13, 1898)

LuVerne News: John Dilts, son-in-law of Z.C. Andruss, has sold his home in Randolph and he and his family are coming up to spend a year at least ‘neath the parental roof. (Algona Upper Des Moines, February 16, 1898)

Continue reading “Short News Items from 1898”

Short News Items from 1897

A social dance was given at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Rorick, in Rockland last night. A number of young folks from The Dalles attended. (The Dalles Times-Mountaineer, February 27, 1897)

Mrs. Casterline is visiting her son, Asa Casterline. Mrs. Casterline is 86 years old and quite smart. (Wilkes-Barre Semi-Weekly Record, April 16, 1897)

E.S.B. Sutton, of the Soo, was on the Alpena bound to Detroit on business Thursday, looking as if life agreed with him. Mr. Sutton is very well known in Cheboygan and used frequently to visit his brother J.P. Sutton in the old days. (Cheboygan Democrat, June 26, 1897)

Short News Items from 1896

Dr. J.R. Armstrong of Irvington, this county, was adjudged insane by the commissioners yesterday and sent to the asylum today. He is one of the old residents of the county. (Des Moines Register, May 3, 1896)

Dr. J.R. Armstrong, of Irvington, this county, was adjudged insane by the commissioners and sent to asylum today. He is one of the old residents of the county. (Des Moines Register, May 3, 1896)

Dr. J.R. Armstrong, one of the pioneers of Kossuth county, has been pronounced insane as the result of protracted sickness. (Waterloo Courier, May 5, 1896)

Continue reading “Short News Items from 1896”

Short News Items from 1895

Mr. and Mrs. John Casterline, of Scranton, and Joseph Casterline, of Orange, were calling on Joseph McRill yesterday. (Scranton Tribune, March 14, 1895)

Mrs. John Rorick went through with the second operation last Tuesday and had removed from her breast and under the arm thirty cancers, some being no larger than a bean and others as large as a hen’s egg. Dr. Rorick performed the operation. Mrs. Rorick is far better than could be expected. (Adrian Daily Telegram, May 28, 1895)

Continue reading “Short News Items from 1895”

Short News Items from 1892

Mrs. Alvin Holmes and son and Mrs. James Casterline are visiting the family of Rev. Frank Doty of Avoca. (Wilkes-Barre Times Leader, February 18, 1892)

Newton Frakes and E.V. McGrew, of Portland, have been visiting their old Perrydale home. (Salem Statesman Journal, August 12, 1892)

E.V. McGrew, of Victoria, has been on a visit to relatives at Perrydale. (Oregon Statesman, December 2, 1892)

Wat. Rorick went to Canandaigua, Mich. last Tuesday morning, to be gone about two months. He ordered the News to follow him so as to be posted on home happenings. (The Caldwell News, December 22, 1892)

Short News Items from 1891

Mrs. Z.E. Brown and sons, Walter and Clarence, of Minneapolis, have been visiting the past ten days with Mrs. Z.C. Andruss. They return to their home in a few days. Mrs. Brown is a sister of Mrs. Andruss. (Algona Republican, August 5, 1891)

Asa Casterline’s residence, in Northmoreland was totally destroyed by fire Wednesday morning. Origin unknown. Loss $1000; insurance $400. Nearly all the household goods were saved. (Wilkes-Barre News, August 7, 1891)

Another accident occurred upon Tuesday of which no information was received until yesterday. Enos Walling was kicked by his bay mare, the shoe cutting his right arm to the bone, which it fractured. (Idaho Semi-Weekly World, August 18, 1891)