Fine Plums

A. Carothers & Co. presented to this office a fine lot of plums, the largest and most delicious we have ever seen. They were from the Willamotte [sic] Nursery, belonging to G.W. Walling, for which Carothers & Co. are agents. The fruit is of a light purple color and as large as a medium sized peach.

Source: Albany State Rights Democrat, August 9, 1872.

Bryant-Shugars

Ethelyn L. Shugars, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Shugars and Gerald S. Bryant, son of the late F.E. Bryant, were married Thursday afternoon, April 17, at the home of the bride’s aunt, Mrs. Cecil Rogers, at Royal Oak. The bride and the groom left for a short wedding trip to Detroit, Buffalo and Niagara Falls. They will make their home on the groom’s farm in Seneca where they will be at home to their many friends after May 15.

Source: Adrian Daily Telegram, April 26, 1919.

Killed By His Horse

Jesse D. Walling, an old and respected citizen of Polk county, was killed by his horse running over him, on the 9th inst. Following is Statesman’s account:

It appears that we out on the roads, as Supervisor, working a party of men. About three o’clock yesterday afternoon, his saddle horse, a young animal, got loose and started to run along the road. Mr. Walling rain in front to stop him, but the animal dashed straight on, striking him in the face and throwing him back against a log with great force. The back of his struck a knot which penetrated the skull and he never spoke again. He was picked up, breathing, but insensible, and carried home while a physician was hastily summoned, but before Dr. Grubbs, who had been called, reached the place the old gentleman was dead. He was an old settler of Oregon, an enterprising citizen, good neighbor, kind friend, and leaves a large family to mourn his sudden loss. They have the sympathizes of a host of friends, for all remember “Uncle Jesse” as a man of kind words and noble deed. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and no doubt the funeral will be under the auspices of the order.

Source: Albany Register, May 14, 1870.

Untitled (Jesse D. Walling)

Jesse Walling, of Polk county, was last Tuesday killed under the following distressing circumstances, as detailed by the Statesman:

It appears that we out on the roads, as Supervisor, working a party of men. About three o’clock yesterday afternoon, his saddle horse, a young animal, got loose and started to run along the road. Mr. Walling rain in front to stop him, but the animal dashed straight on, striking him in the face and throwing him back against a log with great force. The back of his struck a knot which penetrated the skull and he never spoke again. He was picked up, breathing, but insensible, and carried home while a physician was hastily summoned, but before Dr. Grubbs, who had been called, reached the place the old gentleman was dead. He was an old settler of Oregon, an enterprising citizen, good neighbor, kind friend, and leaves a large family to mourn his sudden loss. They have the sympathizes of a host of friends, for all remember “Uncle Jesse” as a man of kind words and noble deed. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and no doubt the funeral will be under the auspices of the order.

Source: Albany State Rights Democrat, May 13, 1870.

Car Bucks Its Way Through Deep Snow

Chevrolet Last Machine in Crater Lake Park.

Drifts Three Feet Deep

Half-Mile Trip Requires Three Hours and 18 Miles Out Takes Three Days’ Time

A Chevrolet “490” touring car is the last machine to visit Crater Lake Park this year, according to A.C. Loosley, a cattleman from Fort Klamath who visited Regner & Fields, local Chevrolet distributors last week. Loosley’s 5000-acre ranch is 100 miles from Medford and on November 14 Loosley was marooned for four days in the mountains, with over three feet of snow as a barrier to the outside world.

Continue reading “Car Bucks Its Way Through Deep Snow”

Libby-Ball

Before a circle of intimate friends and relatives, Helen Evangeline Ball became the bride of Arley R. Libby Thursday afternoon at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clifford A. Ball. Rev. William Wallace Youngson, district superintendent of Methodist Episcopal Churches, officiated.

The bride, clad in a ruffled silk net gown of her own design, made a dainty picture. She carried a shower bouquet of bride and Cecil Brunner roses.

Continue reading “Libby-Ball”

Mrs. R. Adams Is Dead At Lapeer

Was Cousin of Late Ross Grover and Well-Known in Flint.

Lapeer, Mich., March 9.—Mrs. Reedly Adams died at her home here yesterday after an illness of one year.  She leaves her husband; one son, Richard Adams of this city; one sister, Mrs. L.H. Post of Kane; and one brother, Nelson Groover of the Canadian Expeditionary Force. 

Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 2:30 from her late home.

Mrs. Adams was a cousin of Ross Groover of Flint, who, with his two children, died within the last three weeks.

Source:  Flint Journal, March 9, 1918.

Third Member Of Groover Family Taken By Death

Robert H. Groover, five-year-old son of Mrs. Ross D. Groover of 306 East Ninth street, is dead of scarlet fever complicated with pneumonia, the third member of this family to succumb to this malady within three weeks.  An older brother, Gerald, aged eight years, died on February 12, followed by the death of the father, Ross D. Groover, on February 18.  Besides his mother, the boy leaves two brothers, Jack D. and Charles E., all at home.

Source:  Flint Journal, March 5, 1918.