Business and Professional News from the 1890s

Editor Rorick of the Bad Axe Democrat has commenced a $5000 libel suit against the Detroit Tribune. The trouble arises over a news item which appeared in the Tribune in regard to a registered letter which ex Postmaster Rorick failed to turn over to his successor when the office changed hands, but withheld until a postoffice inspector traced it to him last month. (The Huron Times, June 6, 1890)

A large number of copies of the new Huron county directory were delivered in this vicinity last week by E.R. Cookingham and Wm. Rorick. This volume comprises a large amount of valuable information for residents of this county, and its compilation is valuable for its accuracy and reliability. Aside from the maps and other charts displayed it contains a short history of the county. (The Huron Times, October 17, 1890)

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Business and Professional News from the 1880s

J.D. Sutton, formerly of Cheboygan, now a life insurance agent of Detroit, will soon remove to Indianapolis, Ind., having been appointed state agent for a well known insurance company. (Cheboygan Democrat, February 17, 1881)

Emma T. Loosley has been appointed Postmistress at Klamath Agency Oregon. (Oregon Sentinel, December 23, 1882)

NEW STORE.—Frank Rorick, of Lowden, Iowa, has rented the south room of Tyrrell’s block, and about the 25th of this month will take possession with a large stock of groceries. (Wright County Monitor, March 14, 1883)

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Deaths and Funerals from the 1920s

Mrs. Jemima Linderman a former resident of this city is dead at her home in Chicago. (Cheboygan Democrat, September 17, 1920)

Dr. E.H. Rorick, 70, formerly well known in Republican state politics, died at his home in Fayette, Fulton county.  (Fulton County Tribune, February 9, 1922)

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew McNeil and Mr. and Mrs. Grant Brodt were at Ann Arbor Friday where they attend the funeral of the former’s brother-in-law, M.B. Larned. (Oxford Leader, August 22, 1924.

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Wedding News from the Early 1900s

Miss Perita Sanborn, whose marriage with Mr. Clarence Zelora Brown will be celebrated next Tuesday, will be the guest of honor at a luncheon to be given in the tea room today by Miss Anna Kirk and Miss Eva Harris.  The entire party will attend the Euterpe club’s recital later in the afternoon.  A matinee box party will be given Saturday afternoon in behalf of the bride-elect.  Miss Sanborn is entertaining Miss Mayme Bagley of Duluth, Minn., and Miss Edith McQuaid of Des Moines, Ia., both of whom will remain until after the wedding.  (Kansas City Times, January 11, 1900)

Dr. Charles O. Wilkin, a young dentist of Port Jervis, was married, Wednesday afternoon, to Miss Emma VanSickle, daughter of Emmet VanSickle, of that village.  (Middletown Daily Argus, October 18, 1900)

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Kuhn announce the marriage of their eldest daughter, Miss Elizabeth A., to Mr. Chas. F. Beardslee, Wednesday evening, June 19, at 8 o’clock at their residence, 224 Farnsworth avenue.  (Detroit Free Press, June 9, 1901)

An interesting pre-matrimonial event occurred Saturday afternoon when Miss Leila Rorick became the recipient of a kitchen shower at the hands of a dozen or more of her young lady friends.  A comforter was tied, a delightful afternoon spent, and a variety of useful kitchen utensils evidenced the appreciation of the guest.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 2, 1903)

A Child’s Death

Harry Van Sickle, aged three months, child of John E. Van Sickle of this village, died Tuesday night at about 10 o’clock of cholera infantum. The funeral will take place Thursday afternoon at 2:30 from the house.

Source: Port Jervis Evening Gazette, August 10, 1881.

After Many Days.

NEBRASKA CITY, Neb., Dec. 17.—[Special to The Bee.]—Eva Van Sickle has been granted a divorce from her husband, Solomon Van Sickle, on the ground of extreme cruelty. The couple is over sixty years of age, and the court room scene was affecting, as the plaintiff claimed to still lover her husband, but his ill treatment has driven her from him. She also secured $500 alimony.

Source: Omaha Daily Bee, December 18, 1890.

Emmet Van Sickle’s Display

The show window of Mr. Emmet Van Sickle, the Pike street jeweler present to-day a strikingly handsome appearance in its new holiday attire. Tastefully displayed is everything that heart could desire in the line of solid silver and gold ware. At a passing glance we noticed solid silver tea sets, berry dishes of rich colored decorated glass with silver standards, casters, celery dishes, orange berry and sugar spoons, fruit knives, cake baskets, bread trays, and etc. A large line of ladie’s [sic] and gent’s gold and silver watches, diamonds, rings, besides other useful and decorative articles each shown in handsome cases of harmonizing shades. Call in and inspect them.

Source: Port Jervis Union, December 10, 1892.