Short News Items from 1904

Charley Armstrong is up from Irvington today with the carcass of a large wolf which he trapped and secured. (Algona Advance, January 14, 1904)

Homer Drumm, who have [sic] been sick with lagrippe, is able to be out again. (Zanesville Times-Recorder, February 4, 1904)

Tracy Walling came up from Portland last night to attend the funeral of his brother, Fred Walling, at Zena this afternoon. (Salem Capital Journal, February 24, 1904)

Continue reading “Short News Items from 1904”

Advertisements

Business & Professional Notices from 1904

War Department order: Recruit Milan A. Loosley of the general service, now at Dallas, Tex., is transferred to the signal corps at Benecia Barracks, Cal. (San Francisco Call, March 12, 1904)

Amos Mauchmar, who has been employed as night operator at the union depot during the past two months, left Thursday for his home in Wayland, the night office being closed for the season. (Alma Record, April 22, 1904)

Reynolds & Marshall this week purchased half a lot from Otto Walling near the St. John Hardware Company building, and will their harness shop there as soon as their new building is finished. (Colfax Gazette, May 27, 1904)

Continue reading “Business & Professional Notices from 1904”

Short News Items from 1903

Albert Holbein, of Perry street, has removed to the Henry Munson place near Ellis station. (Zanesville Times Recorder, February 25, 1903)

Lorin Walling has been sorely afflicted with inflammatory rheumatism. (Polk County Itemizer, July 3, 1903)

Mr. T.R. Kelly, wife and boy have been spending a generous portion of the hot weather in the canyon, literally wallowing in the delights of nature. (Springville Independent, August 6, 1903)

Continue reading “Short News Items from 1903”

Business and Professional Notices from 1903

T.R. Kelly, has opened a wall paper and paint room in connection with his drug store, which contains a large and excellent stock of paper in the newest designs, and paint of every shade and color, and the best in the market. (Springville Independent, April 23, 1903)

SPRAYING CASE.—The case against Enos Walling, who was charged by the deputy horticultural inspector with failing to spray his trees, was yesterday dismissed in the probate court, as Mr. Walling is now spraying his trees and that is all the authorities desire.  (Idaho Statesman, May 9, 1903)

Continue reading “Business and Professional Notices from 1903”

Short News Items from 1902

The crack shots of the vicinity contested for honors and an oyster supper in a shooting match, blue rock pigeons being used as targets. Frank Boehringer and Lorin Walling were the captains. Loyd Hunt carried off the honors with a score of five birds out of six shots. The winning side and their partners were feasted to oysters in Lincoln warehouse. A pleasant evening was spent in games, but the oysters gave out and Mr. Boehringer and Mr. Duncan have not been heard from since. (Polk County Itemizer, January 17, 1902)

D.A. Baxter, principal of the public schools at Meridian, is in the city to attend the county teachers’ meeting. (Idaho Statesman, February 9, 1902)

Continue reading “Short News Items from 1902”

Short News Items from 1901

W.C. Tyrrell, who has become very much interested in oil, left this morning for his home at Belmont, Ia. He will return soon to look after his interests here. (Beaumont Daily Enterprise, February 7, 1901)

Mrs. Isola M. Rorick of Los Angeles spent yesterday here enjoying the celebration. (Santa Monica Evening Outlook, February 23, 1901)

Miss Maud McCloe gave a dinner Thursday evening for a few friends. (Detroit Free Press, March 17, 1901)

Continue reading “Short News Items from 1901”

Short News Items from 1900

Another grand wolf hunt came off last Saturday. One wolf was cited but the hunters failed to serve their subpoenas on him. Wat Rorick has it in for some near-sighted nimrod who shot him in the lip. (Caldwell News, January 25, 1900)

If this spring-like weather continues Wat Rorick will soon be wending his way to the river with his fishing tackle. (Caldwell Advance, January 25, 1900)

W.M. Toner and family went out to Salem Thursday to visit with relatives. We wish them a pleasant visit. (Lincoln County Leader, March 2, 1900)

Continue reading “Short News Items from 1900”

Matrimonial News from the 1890s

The Randolph, Iowa, Register says: Mr. J.W. Dilts of Randolph and Miss Luella Andruss of Irvington, Kossuth county, were married Tuesday, June 30, at the residence of the bride’s parents. The newly wedded pair arrived in Randolph Wednesday afternoon and in the evening they were tendered a reception by relatives and friends at the residence of Mr. J.H. Wylie. Later they were the recipients of a serenade from the band. Mr. and Mrs. Dilts will soon be at home to their friends on east Randolph street. The Register extends its earnest congratulations. (Algona Upper Des Moines, July 15, 1896)

TYRRELL-WALLING—In this city, June 9, at 1902 Union avenue, by Dr. Charles Edward Locke, Morton H. Tyrrell of Ferndale, Cal., to Lulu Walling of St. Louis, Mo. (San Francisco Chronicle, June 11, 1899)

Death Notices from the 1890s

Newton Frakes, who died near Mitchell, Crook county, Oregon, on the 26th of last month, was born and raised in Polk county, where has many friends. He was about 40 years of age, and leaves a wife and three children to mourn his loss. (Independence Enterprise, January 25, 1895)

J.B. Walling, who died in Boise, Idaho, was an old Oregon pioneer. He was 87 years old, the eldest of six sons, and came from Iowa to Oregon in 1847, settling in Yamhill county. He laid out the town of Amity, and lived in Oregon until 1865, when he moved to Boise, Idaho. Mr. Walling built the first irrigation ditch, and set out the first orchard. (Friday Harbor Islander, November 12, 1896)

Birth Announcements from the 1890s

We failed last week in “catching on” to the advent of a little visitor—a baby girl—at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sid Rorick. Baby’s weight, seven pounds, avoirdupois. Mother and child doing well. (Anamosa Eureka, October 21, 1886)

To Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Holmes, Montgomery Street West Pittston, May 23rd, 1887, a boy. (Pittston Evening Gazette, May 24, 1887)

BORN—In this city, January 2, 1894, to Mr. and Mrs. Enos Walling, a daughter. (Idaho Statesman, January 3, 1894)

Mr. and Mrs. Z.C. Andruss of Irvington are grandparents since election day. The little boy came too late to vote this year. (Algona Upper Des Moines, November 17, 1897)

Lansing Republican: Mr. and Mrs. L.N. Baker have received a telegram announcing the birth of a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. C.M. Rorick, of Morenci. Mrs. Rorick was formerly Miss Georgia Mace, of this city. (Adrian Daily Telegram, February 13, 1899)