Short News Items from 1912

Charley Armstrong has made his trip to California and has stuck his stake there and will move out ere long. He bought a lot and bungalow next door to John Smith’s, and is very much please with his purchase. Before buying he went up the state to San Francisco and to other places, but he found it too foggy up that way to suit him, and so concluded to settle in Santa Monica. He found a man who was just in the humor for selling and he got a bargain, being worth at least $3500 he got it for $2700. He says Mr. and Mrs. Smith are enjoying life in an ideal manner. They live eight blocks from the sea, and the fishing is good and Mr. Smith makes the most of it. Deer and other game may be had in the mountains five miles from there. Mr. Armstrong expects to take his sisters with him, and for a short time they will all live in the bungalow. We wish them every happiness, but are sorry they leave Kossuth county. (Algona Courier, February 9, 1912)

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“Grandma” Walling, Pioneer Of 1847, Dies

Amity, Or., Dec. 7.—“Grandma” Celestia Walling, a pioneer woman of 73 years, died here yesterday morning at an early hour. Mrs. Walling crossed the plains in 1847, when she was only 8 years old, sharing the hardships and dangers of the long, tiresome journey with her folks. He father died before reaching Oregon, but she came on with the rest of her family, and lived with her uncle, “Grandpa” Buffum, until her marriage to Nelson Walling in 1852 [sic]. Her husband died 28 years ago. She is survived by four sons, J.W. Walling, F.W. Walling, Frank Walling and William Walling, three of whom are residents of Amity and one, Frank Walling, of Oregon City. She had only one daughter, who died young. She is also survived by 13 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren, and has one sister living here, Mrs. Phebe Burch, who is four years her junior and is now 77 years old.

Mrs. Walling had been confined to her bed for two years, being perfectly helpless.

Source: Oregon Journal, December 8, 1912.

Weddings and Anniversaries from the 1910s

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Casterline celebrated their golden wedding anniversary recently and in recognition of this event a few relatives gathered at the home of their daughter, Mrs. Irving Drake. (Wilkes-Barre Record, February 24, 1911)

Charles A. Howard, the obliging cashier in the Southern Pacific depot at Silverton, is now a benedict, and was in the city yesterday looking over the Christmas presents. Miss Vera Walling is the bride. Miss Walling resides at Brooks, but will be at home to her friends in Silverton hereafter. Had it not been for the timely warning of a clerk in a local establishment, Mr. Howard would have boarded his train without his suitcase, in which, he declared, were many pretty things for wifey. (Salem Capital Journal, December 19, 1912)

Mrs. Charles E. Gallup announces the marriage of her daughter, Genevieve Shafer, to Harper Gallup, of Detroit, which took place Saturday evening at the Methodist church, of this city, Rev. A.W. Stalker officiating. (Detroit Free Press, September 9, 1917)

Death Notices from the 1910s

The funeral of Joseph Casterlin was held at his late home at Orange on Monday, Feb. 3. Interment at Eaton Cemetery. (Wilkes-Barre Record, February 12, 1913)

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Rorick and Miss Grace Hoover drove to Fayette yesterday afternoon to attend the funeral of Mr. Perley Cawley, they were accompanied by Mrs. F.E. Kenyon. (Fulton County Tribune, June 25, 1915)

JOHNSON—At the family residence, 511 East Ash., November 30, Stella Walling Johnson, wife of Walter Johnson, mother of Eva and Elva Johnson, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Jesse D. Walling. Funeral services will be held Thursday, December 4, at 2 P.M., from the conservatory chapel of F.S. Dunning, Inc., 414 East Alder. Friends invited. (Portland Oregonian, December 3, 1919)

Birth Announcements from the 1910s

A new baby girl arrived at the home of W.S. Bean bright and early Friday morning. (Oregon Daily Journal, April 30, 1910)

CLEVELAND—To Mr. and Mrs. Ellis E. Cleveland, 27 Sanford street, Sunday, May 21, at Hackley hospital, a son. (Muskegon Chronicle, May 22, 1911)

CHITTENDEN—To Mr. and Mrs. Elbert Chittenden, 57 Florence street, Wednesday, February 23, 1916, a daughter, Ione Helen. (Muskegon Chronicle, February 29, 1916)

WALLING—To Mr. and Mrs. R.J. Walling, 526 Belmont street, July 9, 1918, a daughter. She has been named Margaret Jane. (Salem Capital Journal, July 10, 1918)

Short News Items from 1910

Mrs. J.J. Walling of Nampa, accompanied by her sister, Miss Amy Madden of Caldwell, left on Friday for Rochester, Minn., where Mrs. Walling goes for hospital treatment. (Caldwell Tribune, August 5, 1910)

Mr. and Mrs. Harlow D. Ingall have returned from their wedding trip and have been spending a few days at the home of Mrs. Ingall’s father, Charles E. Gallup of East Kingsley street. They leave tomorrow for Medina Center where they will make their home on a farm. (Ann Arbor News, August 12, 1910)

Mrs. Isaac Shipman and daughter, Hazel, of Waverly, were guests last week of John and Russell Slocum (Rushville Chronicle, December 30, 1910)

Matrimonial News from the Aughts

Miss Frances Walling, daughter of Albert Walling, a prominent nurseryman, living near Oswego, and Leonard Hallinan, of the same place were married at the residence of the bride’s parents on Monday evening last. (Hillsboro Independent, June 22, 1906)

James Glandon and Miss Janette Jacks were married December 20 at 201 Eleventh street, the resident of the pastor of the White Temple. Dr. J. Whitcomb Brougher performed the ceremony. (Oregon Daily Journal, December 23, 1906)

The young people gave Mr. and Mrs. John Clemans a great send-off Thursday afternoon when they took the train for Peru. Their trunks were decorated with such suggestive placards as “Mr. and Mrs. Newlyweds;” “Just Married,” etc. On the groom’s back was pinned a paper informing the public in large letters that “We’re just married, we are.” The young couple were showered with rice until the train pulled out. (Nebraska Advertiser, December 27, 1907)

Business & Professional Notices from the Aughts

The Rapid Transit Steamboat Co., of Rainier, with a capital stock of $40,000—800 shares of the par value of $50 each—has been organized with W.E. Newsom, W.S. Buchanan and W.C. Fisher, incorporators. The object of the corporation is to do a general steamboat business on the Columbia river and its tributaries. One or more fast boats will be built in time for the 1905 fair traffic. Captain Newsom built the Iralda, and gave the people a taste of better service and cheaper fare, which culminated in a general rate war that was only settled by the opposition buying his boat outright. The first boat to be constructed by this company will be built at Rainier within the next six months. It will be built specially for burning oil. (St. Helens Mist, September 12, 1902)

F.E. Walling closed out his business here and has gone to Cottage Grove where he has a position with the Wildwood Lumber Co. (Newburg Graphic, July 26, 1906)

Death Notices from the Aughts

Samuel Tuthill Lazear died at Warwick, Saturday, aged 76 years. For a number of years he was engaged in the sash and blind business with Sylvester Case. (Port Jervis Tri-States Union, November 22, 1900)

McRILL—In West Wyoming, Nov. 30, 1900, Joseph McRill, aged 50 years, pleuro-pneumonia.  (Wilkes Barre Record, December 3, 1900)

James J. Reynolds died Tuesday morning. He has been troubled with heart disease for some time. The funeral will be held Friday at 1 o’clock at his late home. Interment at Pulteney. (Yates County Chronicle, October 22, 1902)

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Short News Items from 1909

Egbert D. Chittenden is very ill with bronchitis and heart trouble at his residence, 42 Apple street. (Muskegon Chronicle, January 11, 1909)

J.J. Walling returned this morning from a two months trip during which he went to the finest parts of California. He reports a very plaeasant [sic] trip but is glad to get back to Nampa valley where there are fewer storms and greater opportunities for getting on in the world than in the famed citrus belt.—Nampa Leader-Herald. (Caldwell Tribune, March 13 1909)

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