Small Town News—Idaho Statesman

D.A. Baxter is back from his camping expedition. (Idaho Daily Statesman, August 23, 1900)

RETURNED HOME — Mrs. Frank Berkley, whose husband was killed near Pocatello, returned yesterday to Glenn’s Ferry, accompanied by her parents, Mrs. and Mrs. James Mullaney. (Idaho Daily Statesman, July 7, 1901)

Mrs. F.B. Berkley and Mrs. James Mullany went to Pocatello on Monday last to settle the affairs of the late F.B. Berkley. (Idaho Daily Statesman, July 18, 1901)

Mrs. Frank Berkley is visiting in Nampa, the guest of Mrs. B.F. Walling. (Idaho Daily Statesman, August 31, 1901)

An examination of the returns from Highland Valley precinct discloses that a vote was cast for Mrs. Gile for constable. (Idaho Daily Statesman, November 16, 1898)

The eighty-sixth birthday of J.B. Walling was celebrated on Saturday last at the home of his son, Enos Walling, near this city. Mr. Walling has been a citizen of Idaho for more than half a century and his kind deeds have won for him scores of friends. He has been an elder in the Church of Christ since that church was established and has given liberally for its maintenance. He is quite feeble in body, but loves the society of his friends. Among the number present from Boise at the birthday dinner were Professor and Mrs. Kiggins and Rev. and Mrs. J.L. Weaver. Relatives were also present from Oregon. An excellent dinner was served and the afternoon was spent in songs and conversation. The guests all wish for Mr. Walling many happy returns of the day. (Idaho Statesman, August 28, 1895)

J.J. Walling was up from Caldwell Sunday. (Idaho Statesman, January 29, 1901)

Advertisements

The Walling Ditch

The Walling Ditch, owned by Jerome B. Walling, was an important source of water during the early days of Boise, ID.  It appears that the company was a family business that employed, at various times, Jerome Walling’s sons,  Enos C. and Nelson B. Walling, and his son-in-law, James Mullany. Following are some news items about the Walling Ditch.

NOTICE: The undersigned is now cleaning out the Boise City Water Ditch, bringing water to the upper part of the city. Those desiring to take water, and pay for the same in work, can have an opportunity to do so by applying immediately for work. J.B. Walling, Superintendent, Boise City, I.T., April 13, 1872. (Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman, April 13, 1872)

Those who have observed the growth of our city will remember the building of the ditch south of Main street, and the rapid settlement of that part of town lying along the ditch, known as Grove street. This was owing to facilities afforded by the ditch in obtaining water for irrigating purposes. Many fine residences were erected, shade trees, shubbery and fruit trees planted out, and have grown up, so that this street is truly lovely and delightful. In the north or upper side of town there was no ditch, and although this portion of town was considerably well settled up in 1864, and has been growing slowly since that time, the houses are inferior and property cheaper than on the south side. The land is quite as good and the surface level, but the drawback for the want of water was seriously felt, and without this advantage it was plainly evident that this portion of town would never become desirable. After several ineffectual efforts, a ditch was brought in from Boise River covering all this portion of the city. For some cause or other the ditch has not proved profitable to the owner, or all that was necessary for the prosperity of those who depended upon it for watering their trees and gardens. It was, however, largely improved last year, and afforded water the major part of the season. This year the ditch has been farther [sic] improved, and we have every reason to believe it will yield a good supply of water. Mr. J.B. Walling is in charge of the ditch, and there is no doubt but that he understands the business and will keep all this portion of town fully supplied with water during the whole season. He has reduced the water rates, and no man need to grumble, and proposes to insure a supply of water by collecting the rent from time to time as the season advances so that none shall say that they have paid for water they didn’t have. There is no reason why this ditch should not yield as certain a supply of water as the lower ditch, and we are satisfied it will under Mr. Walling’s good management. If this fact is established it will raise the credit of the ditch property, and make the property in the upper portion of town the most desirable. The location is more elevated, and with the same improvements, residences, shade trees and gardens, it would be more beautiful and we doubt not will eventually become more valuable. With the public square well fenced, a good State House erected, shade trees grown up, and the grounds laid out in walks and otherwise ornamented, who would not consider a residences [sic] in this locality as desirable, if not more so, than in any other portion of our city. (Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman, June 18, 1872)

WATER, WATER: Persons will take notice that water is now running in the Boise Water Ditch, and they are required to clean out the town ditches, preparatory to using it. Terms, one half down and the other half payable the first of July. All persons using the water will be required to pay. — J.B. Walling, Superintendent. (Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman, May 13, 1873)

WATER! WATER! All persons wanting water from the upper ditch will clean out their ditches and apply to me for water. — J.B. Walling (Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman, May 20, 1876)

GET READY FOR WATER: Parties who want water from the Walling ditch will attend to putting in taps or boxes immediately, as it will be inconvenient to put them in when the ditch is full of water. The water will be let into the ditch in three of four days. — James Mullaney, manager of the Walling ditch (Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman, April 19, 1881)

NO DAMS: All persons are notified not to put any dam or dams in the Walling Ditch, as any or all persons who do so after the publication of this notice will be prosecuted. — James Mullaney, Superintendent (Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman, August 2, 1881)

The bridge across the Walling ditch, on the Warm Springs road, is an old rattletrap. It is not half as wide as it ought to be, the plank should be thicker, put on new stringers and fastened down, and a good railing put up at each end of the bridge. It is only a miracle that some accident has not happened at this place and we hope the road supervisor of that district will see that a new and substantial bridge is made over that ditch. And while he is mending his ways in this respect, let him cause the road to be opened through Bob Wilson’s place to its proper place. We have read in the scriptures that the road to the penitentiary is “broad and smooth,” and we are in scripture land. (Idaho Statesman, September 23, 1881)

Four-fifths of the Walling Ditch was sold by J.B. Walling to Joseph Perrault on Monday last for $10,500, and one fifth by E.L. Curtis to R.Z. Johnson. (Idaho Daily Statesman, March 7, 1888)

It will be seen that Mr. Walling has inserted an advertisement in our columns in which he requests that all ditches that take water from his own be cleaned out. In addiiton to this Marshall Iseli puts in his demand and says they must be, or he will enforce the city ordinances in that direction, as he does not mean that every sidewalk and street on the line dependent upon that ditch shall be converted into a mud puddle. (Idaho Daily Statesman, March 31, 1888)

The marshal had the water shut off in the Walling ditch yesterday because property owners had not complied with the law and some of the streets became flooded. People should clean out their [unclear]. The marshal does not wish to be severe and the acts of the negligent cause others to suffer. The city cannot forebear much longer. (Idaho Daily Statesman, April 10, 1888)

Water from the Walling ditch is improving vegetation on the north side of town very much. (Idaho Daily Statesman, April 10, 1888).

The expression of intention made by Mr. Joseph Perrault, as the representative of the owners of the Walling ditch, to no longer sell irrigating water to the people of Boise City, deserves consideration. It is to be presumed that Mr. Perrault would not make such a statement unless he meant it, and if the owners of the Walling ditch do intend to discontinue running water into the city, some movements should be made at once to arrange for an irrigation supply. It will not do to permit Boise’s beautiful trees and lawns to die for lack of irrigation, and more rneans than the water company’s supply will undoubtedly need to be obtained. (Idaho Daily Statesman, September 12, 1891).

Curlew gulch is as dry as a bone. The water supply from the city serves for drinking and culinary purposes, while the horses get their drink from the Walling ditch. (Idaho Daily Statesman, October 4, 1891)

The city council has ordered the bridge across the Walling ditch at Ninth street to be repaired. The owners of the ditch refused to repair the bridge. The city will do so and bring suit to recover the cost in the event of the Grove street ditch case being decided in its favor. (Idaho Daily Statesman, October 14, 1899)

Small Town News—Mullany

James H. Mullany came in from Glenns Ferry yesterday. (Idaho Daily Statesman, May 8, 1898)

On the first inst. Mrs. James Mullany was called to Boise on account of the serious illness of James Mullany, Jr. She reports him much better. (Idaho Daily Statesman, June 6, 1901)

Judge James Mullany, who has resided at Glenns Ferry for many years, was in the city yesterday attending the fair. In response to an inquiry about Glenns Ferry, the judge said the town was enjoying a real boom. More buildings, and good ones too, had been built this fall than in four years before, and as agent of the township company he had sold more lots in the last six weeks than in the last three years. He said the contract to build the Malad Canal had not only been let but a large force of men and teams were at work on it. The crowd of people settling in Glenns Ferry were from Iowa, and the only regret of the judge is was that they had not been there long enough to vote, as they were all Republicans. (Idaho Daily Statesman, October 25, 1902)

Glenns Ferry, Sept. 26 — A very pleasant surprise party was tendered Monday evening to Mrs. James Mullaney, it being her fiftieth birthday. A number of the neighbors arrived unexpectedly with crowded lunch baskets and a very pleasant evening was passed by all. Those present were Mrs. D.C. O’Brien, Mrs. J.T. Huntington, Mrs. Bert Alford, Mrs. William Rosevere, Miss Ella Shetts, Miss Pearl Jennings, Miss Nora Morrow, Miss Lizzie Woodrich, Frank Carrigan, Herman Jacobson, and Charles E. Stewart. (Idaho Daily Statesman, September 27, 1900)

Mrs. J. Mullaney of Glenn’s Ferry is visiting her daughter, Mrs. Sarah Berkley. (Idaho Daily Statesman, November 26, 1901)

Misses Kate and Sarah Mullaney, daughters of James Mullaney, the well known citizen of Glenns Ferry, are visiting in the city. (Idaho Daily Statesman, January 7, 1896)

John Lat[unclear]y, William Orr, Charles Brady and W.R. Mullany pulled out for Rocky Bar yesterday. (Idaho Daily Statesman, May 17, 1901)

Small Town News—Bean

W.S. Bean, conductor on the Colorado Midland railway, running between Denver and Como, met with an accident in some way which cost him an arm yesterday. Mr. Bean formerly resided in Boise, and was a conduct on the cannon ball train. He was married to Miss Mullaney of Glenns Ferry, sister of James Mullaney of that city. No particulars have been received other than the brief statement that reached Mr. Mullaney yesterday. (Idaho Daily Statesman, August 20, 1902)

Mr. and Mrs. William Bean and family of Huntingaon [sic], Ore., came up to spend Christmas with Mrs. James Mullaney. Mrs. Sara Burkley [sic] went to Huntington, Ore., last Thursday evening, returning with her sister, Mrs. Kate Bean. (Idaho Statesman, December 28, 1904)

Jerome Mullany Killed in Snow Slide

Silver City, Jan. 4. — Robert Nichols and John [sic] Mullaney, two car men at the Blaine tunnel, were killed in a snow slide about 7:30 last night. They started to go down town on their snow shoes from the Trade Dollar mine. They were missed last night but their friends thought they might be in town and search was not commenced until late. This morning the bodies of both were found buried in about 4 feet of hard snow. Both were single. Mullaney’s parents reside at Glenn’s Ferry. (Idaho Statesman, January 5, 1895)

The remains of Jerome Mullaney, who was killed in a snow slide at Silver City last Thursday, have been brought to this city. The funeral will be held from the residence of J.B. Walling, on Warm Springs avenue, at 2 o’clock this afternoon. (Idaho Statesman, January 6, 1895)

Will and Probate Documents for Jerome B. Walling

 

In the Name of the Benevolent Father of all, I, Jerome B. Walling of Boise City, County of Ada, State of Idaho, being of sound and disposing mind do publish and hereby declare this my last Will and Testament as follows:

First: I direct that my funeral be held with proper regard to my station in life and the circumstances of my estate.

Second: I direct that executor hereinafter named, as soon as there shall be sufficient funds in his hands, shall pay the funeral expenses and the expenses of my last sickness.

Third: I give and bequeath to my grand-daughter, Getrude Walling Scott, daughter of my son, Inman, deceased, the sum of five hundred ($500) dollars which shall be taken and delivered in full from her full share; and that of any children of said Inman Walling.

Fourth: I direct that, as the children of my daughter, Mary Walling Jackson, deceased, have been provided for in my lifetime, it is my will that nothing be given to said children or the heirs of said Mary Walling Jackson.

Fifth: I give and bequeath to Lucy Walling Loosley, my daughter, the bed and bedding now used by me in the house of my son Enos where I now reside.

Sixth: I hereby declared [sic] the following amounts to be deemed advancements to the several persons hereinafter named, being my sons and daughters, which sums I have advanced to said persons, at various times; and that no other sums whatsoever are to be taken or deemed as advancements unless the same shall be given in advance by me to them or either of [illegible] after the date of this will; and said sums shall be taken and deemed in full settlement of all claims of mine or my estate against said persons up to the date of this will, to wit: My son Jeptha, two hundred and twenty-five ($225) dollars; my daughter Rosalie Walling Gile, three hundred ($300) dollars; my daughter, Caroline Walling Mullany, one hundred ($100) dollars; my son, Nelson Walling, seven ($700) hundred dollars; My son, Enos C. Walling, one thousand ($1000) dollars, and said sums shall not bear interest or any interest to be added thereto.

Seventh: It is my will and I so direct that after the payment of my just debts, expenses of administration, and the payment of the above bequest of five hundred ($500) dollars that the rest, residue, and remainder of all my estate both real, personal, and mixed of every name and nature whatsoever including for the purposes of computation the amounts herein declared to be advancements and any hereafter made, shall be divided into eight (8) equal shares, one of which shares, after deducting from the amount thereof the sum charged against each as advancements, I give and bequeath to each of my sons and daughters now being to wit Jeptha, Lucy Loosley, Rosalie Gile, Caroline Mullany, Jerome, Nelson, and Enos, and the remaining one-eighth share I give and bequeath to my hereinafter named executor in trust for my son Fletcher.

Eighth: I direct that my hereinafter named executor shall represent my son Fletcher in all matters that may arise out of the settlement of my estate and the portion hereby bequeathed to my said son and that he shall retain the care, control, and custody of the said share by notice of this my will until my said son Fletcher shall become capable of the management of his own person and estate without the need of a guardian or committee or until his death; and my executor is hereby authorized and empowered to reduced said portion to money and invest the same in any manner he may deem for the best interest of my said son and his share of my estate. Should my son become capable of the management of his own estate and person, then it is my will and I direct that my executor shall on due proofs of the same at once turn over and pay to my said son Fletcher the portion of my estate herein bequeathed to him; and should my said son Fletcher died before becoming capable of the management of his own person and estate or before his portion has been turned over and paid to him, then it is my will and I direct that my said executor shall divide the said portion herein bequeathed to my said son Fletcher between my seven sons and daughters now living and named in paragraph seven herein, share and share alike.

Ninth: It is my will and I direct that my executor shall continue to administer my estate until the debts due to me or to my estate shall become due according to the terms thereof unless sooner paid; and that until the portion of my estate herein bequeathed to my executor in trust for my said son Fletcher has been distributed as herein before provided; unless my said executor should deem it to be for the best interest of my estate that the sums be sooner settle, and in apportioning the respective shares herein bequeathed except for the specific bequest of five hundred ($500) dollars, my executor may reduce all of the estate to money and make divisions of same; or he may make partitions of the real estate and personal property without so reducing them to money as he may deem best.

Tenth: I hereby nominate and appoint Harry C. Nyman of Boise City, Ada County and State of Idaho, the executor of this my last will and testament and hereby I do revoke all and any former wills by me at any time made.

In witness whereof I have [illegible] to set my hand and seal this 21st day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eighteen hundred and ninety three.

Jerome B. Walling

[Witnessed] David D.W. Edwards, Residence, Fort Springs Avenue, Boise City, Idaho
[Witnessed] Lewis L. Bonners, Residence, Cor. 10th and Idaho Sts., Boise City, Idaho

Source:  Ada County Probate File B-398.

Death of J.B. Walling

He Passes Away Peacefully at His Home on the Avenue

WAS ILL FOR SEVEN YEARS

Large Number of Descendants — Funeral to Occur This Afternoon

Jerome B. Walling died yesterday morning at his residence on the Hot Springs road after a lingering illness of nearly seven years. For the past few months he had been gradually declining but up to the last was conscious and died peacefully.

Mr. Walling was born in New York state August 24, 1809. At the age of nine years, his parents moved to Meigs county, O., and in 1825 a further removal was made to Fulton county, Ill. Mr. Walling was there when the Black Hawk war broke out and served through it at the command of Captain Maxwell. At the close of the war he married Miss Sarah Leaverton of Fulton county, Ill., March 4th, 1829. She died April 2, 1890.

[In] 1837 Mr. and Mrs. Walling moved to Iowa and in 1848 they came to Yamhill county, Or. Mr. Walling served as a member of the state legislature in 1850 and in 1851 was elected county commissioner of Yamhill county, which office he held for four years. In 1864 he moved to the Boise valley and was so much pleased with the outlook that he resided here ever since.

Mr. Walling will ever be remembered with gratefulness by the people of Boise for the construction of the Walling ditch. He first took out water from the river some two miles above the present Walling place for the purpose of irrigating his own land. A company was soon formed by which the ditch was brought into town. Water for the shade trees of the city was furnished from the ditch free of charge for 20 years. Mr. Walling secured control of four-fifths of the ditch and E.J. Curtis the other fifth. Some 12 years ago Joseph Perrault bought the Walling interest and R.Z. Johnson owns the Curtis share.

Mr. Walling was the father of 16 children, eight of whom survive him. He had 75 grandchildren and a goodly number of great-grandchildren. The living children are as follows: Mrs. Lucy Loosley, Fort Klamath, Or.: Jeptha Walling, Tillamook, Or.: Fletcher Walling, Salem, Or.: Nelson Walling, Portland, Or.: Jerome Walling, California: Mrs. Clara Mullaney, Glenns Ferry: Mrs. Rosalie Gile, Highland Valley, Idaho: Enos C. Walling, Boise.

Mr. Walling was a member of the Masonic order, the only fraternal order he ever joined. He was a mason for 60 years. He showed good judgment and economy in his business transactions and always held the respect and confidence of his fellow citizens.

The funeral will take place at the family residence at 5 o’clock this afternoon. All friends of the deceased are invited to attend. Rev. J.B. Weber will conduct the services.

Source: The Idaho Daily Statesman, July 30, 1897.

Fire at James Mullaney’s House

A SLIGHT BLAZE ON WASHINGTON STREET: The alarm of fire was sounded on Tuesday, about 11 o’clock a.m., which proved to be in a small barn of James Mullaney’s on Washington street. The Hook and Ladder Company started almost instantly from the engine building, the firemen coming on the run from down town and catching hold of the rope. About the same time Mr. N.S. Hubble came from his house, near the fire, on a horse, on a dead run, and took the forward end of the rope, and with a turn around the horn of his saddle, helped the boys amazingly and kept them on a dead run until they reached the fire, five blocks away. The engine was started almost as soon, probably not more than a minute behind, and hauled to the cistern on Idaho street and the hose laid as far as it would reach, 1,000 feet, to the block where the fire was, but could not reach the fire by about 200 feet, although the hose partially commanded Captain Griffin’s residence on the same block, on which they threw some water. Mullaney’s barn was very frail and burned down by the time the Hook and Ladder Company reached there; but Captain Griffin’s barn, a good substantial small building, stood almost adjoining Mullaney’s and took fire and burned down. The Captain had a good buggy in his barn which he saved. No other building stood near enough to be in danger. Mr. Mullaney was at work on the Walling ditch, but soon got to the fire. He told us he had no idea how the fire originated. Some say that his children were in the barn playing they were getting dinner and started a fire with matches they could not put out. They went to house and told their mother and she went with a pail of water, but the fire had spread and was beyond control. The lost to Mr. Mullaney is not over one hundred dollars, while Captain Griffin’s loss is probably two hundred and fifty or three hundred dollars.

Source:  Idaho Statesman, April 7, 1881.

Frank Berkley, Killed in a Train Accident

BERKLY MANGLED

Frank Berkly, Formerly of Boise, Meets Horrible Death

Head and Legs Severed

Falls Under Engine at Bannock Siding, 16 Miles West of Pocatello —
Remains Taken to Gate City for Internment — Deceased Well Known Here

Pocatello, July 2 — Frank Berkly, a Short Line brakeman, was instantly killed and his body mutilated in a frightful manner at Bannock siding, 16 miles west of here, at 12:45 this morning.

He was on a westbound freight, which was to take the Bannock siding, and crawled through the engine cab to the pilot to throw the switch.

No one saw the fall, but later his dismembered body was picked up with the head and both legs severed.

Berkly leaves a wife, the daughter of Postmaster James Mullany of Glenn’s Ferry.

He was a member of good standing of the Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias.

Deceased Well Known in the Capital City

Frank Berkly, who was killed at the Bannock siding yesterday, was well known in Boise. He was a brakeman on the Boise Special for some time. Last summer, he met with an accident here, his hand being mashed. James Mullany, Jr., who is one of the Short Line firemen stationed here, is a brother-in-law of the deceased. He leaves this evening for Pocatello to attend the funeral.

Source: Idaho Daily Statesman, July 3, 1901.

ATTENTION, ODD FELLOWS

All members of Wildey Lodge No. 62, I.O.O.F., are hereby notified to assemble at G.A.R. Hall at 1 o’clock this afternoon to attend the funeral of Frank B. Berkley, deceased, of Port Neuf Lodge No. 20. — M.W. Clark, N.G., Geo. P. Wheeler, Secretary.

Source: Idaho Daily Statesman, July 5, 1901.

Berkley Funeral

Many Friends Attend the Internment at the Masonic Cemetery

The funeral of Frank Berkely was held at 3 o’clock yesterday afternoon, under the auspices of the Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and railroad men of this city. It was largely attended, the young man having had many warm friends here. His wife and Mr. and Mrs. James Mullaney of Glenn’s Ferry were in attendance as well as his brother-in-law James Mullaney, Jr.

The large cortege went from the Odd Fellows’ hall on Eighth street, down Idaho to Warm Springs avenue and thence to the cemetery. The remains were laid to rest in the Masonic cemetery, many beautiful floral offerings being presented.

Source: Idaho Daily Statesman, July 6, 1901.

Note: The last name is spelled differently in each story.