Some Short Death Notices

REDDING, Nov. 24.—Adolph Dobrowsky died suddenly at 9 o’clock this morning of heart failure.  Dobrowsky was 65 years of age and was born in Austria.  He came to California in the fifties and to the old town of Shasta in 1860, where he followed his profession of jeweler.  He removed to Anderson and fifteen years ago to Redding.  He has since conducted the Golden Eagle jewelry store.  Dobrowsky is survived by a widow and two sons, Frank and Ernest, the former being his partner.  (San Francisco Call, November 25, 1901).

Mrs. Theodore Margarum died at the Margarum homestead, in Sussex, N.J., last Saturday afternoon. She was about 75 years of age.  The deceased is survived by one son, Ford Margarum, president of the Sussex National Bank, and a daughter, Mrs. H.J. Harp, also of Sussex.  (Middletown Times-Press, May 4, 1917.

John D. Adams received a dispatch today telling of the death of his aunt, Mrs. Emily Paugh, at Mt. Salem, N.J., November 30, aged 69.  Funeral tomorrow at 11 a.m. at Mt. Salem.  (Middletown Times-Press, December 1, 1891)

Gabriel Walling, who came to Oregon in 1854, was found dead in bed at the home of his son, Frank Walling, yesterday morning.  He was 68 years of age and was closely associated with the history of the Willamette valley.  Six children survive him, as follows:  John E., who lives at Mabel, Linn county; George G., F.M. and Roy G., who live in Portland; Walter C. and Nellie E., who live in Salem. (Oregon Daily Journal, January 16, 1904).


Wedding Announcements from the New York Times

Miss Sara Streit Riker, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Marsh Riker of 83 Lincoln Park, Newark, was married to Andrew Van Blarcom in the South Park Presbyterian Church, Newark, last evening. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Lyman Whitney Allen, pastor of the church. The bride was attended by her sister, Miss Berrian Riker, while Leonard [sic] Van Blarcom, brother of the bridegroom, was best man. The flower girls were Miss Marguerite Riker and Miss Prudence Durand, and the bridesmaids were Miss Elsie Riker of East Orange; Miss Alice Allen of Williamsport, Penn.; Miss Annie Orr of Pittsburg [sic], Penn.; Miss Matilda Dodd, Miss Elizabeth Carter, and Miss Elsie Tripp of Newark. The ushers were Harold Dodge, Franklin Conklin, Jr., and Henry Kays of Newton; Robert Southard, Charles Inslee, and Ralph Inslee of New York. Owing to a recent death in the bride’s family, there was no reception. (New York Times, May 10, 1906)

Miss Marion Louise Robertson, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Samuel E. Robertson of 21 Walnut St., Newark, N.J., and Ford W. Margarum of Sussex, were married last night at the bride’s home by the Rev. Dr. Robert Scott Inglis, pastor of the Third Presbyterian Church, North. Miss Robertson is a former student at Blair Academy and Mr. Margarum is the President of the Farmers National Bank of Sussex. His grandfather and father each occupied the same position. (New York Times, November 29, 1916)

Mr. and Mrs. William Casper Tyrrell of Beaumont, Texas, have announced to friends here the engagement of their daughter, Miss Carol Tyrrell, to Harold Moyer Gilmore of Philadelphia. The wedding will take place in Belmond, Iowa, on Sept. 21. (New York Times, August 15, 1929)

The marriage of Miss Margaret Louise Milne, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George H. Milne, to Charles Livingston Stover, son of Mrs. Charles L. Stover of Lowell, Mass., took place yesterday afternoon in the chapel of St. Bartholomew’s Church. The Right Reverend Fred Ingley, Coadjutor Bishop of Colorado, performed the ceremony in the presence of a small gathering. The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, wore a gown of blue chiffon and a picture hat. Mrs. Richard Kates Paynter, Jr. of Princeton, N.J., was the bride’s only attendant. She wore a gown of apricot-colored chiffon and a picture hat. She carried a bouquet of delphinium and African daisies. Richard Stover was best man and Victor Dockmeyer of Bronxville, N.Y., was usher. (New York Times, April 28, 1932)

SUSSEX, N.J., June 28 — Miss Janet Robertson Margarum, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ford Margarum of this place, was married tonight in the Sussex Presbyterian Church to Ralph Albert Taylor, son of Mr. and Mrs. Winfred Taylor of Summit, N.J., by the pastor, the Rev. A.J.W. Mowatt. The bride, given in marriage by her father, had her sister, Miss Martha Louise Margarum, for maid of honor. Mr. Taylor’s father was best man. (New York Times, June 29, 1940)

Ardsley-on-Hudson, N.Y., Jan. 25 — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Livingston Stover have made known the engagement of their daughter, Louise Milne Stover, to John T. Roberts of Hingham, Mass. He is the son of Capt. Reed T. Roberts, U.S.N., retired, and Mrs. Roberts of Chevy Chase, Md. Miss Stover, who made her debut at the 1954 Westchester Cotillion, was graduated from the Masters School in Dobbs Ferry. She is a senior at Wellesley College. The late Mr. and Mrs. Charles Livingston Stover of Lowell, Mass., and the late Mr. and Mrs. George Hutchinson Milne of New York and Lakeville, Conn., were her grandparents. Mr. Roberts prepared at the Brooks School, North Andover, Mass., for Massachusetts Institute of Technology, from which he graduated last June. (New York Times, January 26, 1958)

Elmsford, N.Y., Sept. 6 — Miss Louise Milne Stover and John Tyssowski Roberts were married here this afternoon in the Protestant Episcopal Church of St. Joseph of Arimathea. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Walter H. McNeeley. A reception was held at Beech Hill, the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Livingston Stover. The bridegroom is the son of Capt. Reed T. Roberts, U.S.N., retired, and Mrs. Roberts of Chevy Chase, Md. Miss Carol Millholland was maid of honor and the bridesmaids were the Misses Jean Stover, a sister of the bride; Jane Roberts, sister of the bridegroom; Anne Fiske, Gail Dix and Yvonne Laan. Karl Corley was best man. Miss Roberts, who made her debut at the 1954 Westchester Cotillion, was graduated from the Masters School and in June from Wellesley College. She is a provisional member of the Junior League of Tarrytown. Her husband, who is attending the law school of the University of Virginia, is an alumnus of the Brooks School, North Andover, Mass., and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, class of ’57. He is a second lieutenant in the Army Reserve. (New York Times, September 7, 1958)

Marion Robinson & Ford W. Margarum

Miss Marion Louise Robertson, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Samuel E. Robertson of 21 Walnut St., Newark, N.J., and Ford W. Margarum of Sussex, were married last night at the bride’s home by the Rev. Dr. Robert Scott Inglis, pastor of the Third Presbyterian Church, North. Miss Robertson is a former student at Blair Academy and Mr. Margarum is the President of the Farmers National Bank of Sussex. His grandfather and father each occupied the same position.

Source: New York Times, November 29, 1916

Small Town News—Margarum

Janet Margarum, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Stanford Margarum, is recovering at her home. She has been seriously ill in Sussex Hospital. (Middletown Times Herald, January 8, 1946)

Unionville — Janet Margarum, young daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Stanford Margarum, is recuperating at Lynn Hospital, Sussex, following an appendectomy on Tuesday. (Middletown Times Herald, February 15, 1946)

Miss Mary Margarum, of Deckertown, is a guest of Mrs. F.M. Stratton. (Middletown Daily Argus, June 13, 1898)

Last Saturday afternoon Mr. Noah Margarum was bringing two ladies — Mrs. S.T. Lazear and Mrs. C.S. Hunter — from his home near Stockholm, N.J., where they had been visiting, to Warwick. The rear seat of the wagon was not fastened, and the ladies were fearful lest it should fall out; but Mr. Margarum said it was all right. Just on top of the Vernon Mountain the horses shied at something in the road and the ladies were thrown backward, striking their heads and shoulders. Both sustained concussion of the brain, and were removed to the nearest house — that of Mr. Webb. Dr. W.B. Bradner was summoned from Warwick and the ladies were made as comfortable as possible. They suffered great pain and were for a time delirious, but at last accounts were reported to be improving. Mrs. Lazear is an elderly lady — almost 60 years of age — and Mrs. Hunter is her youngest daughter. (Warwick Valley Dispatch, August 25, 1886)

Stanford Margarum is under treatment by Dr. Louis Myers for an eye injury suffered Saturday while at work. (Middletown Times Herald, December 15, 1941)

Stanford Margarum will move to the New Ideal Farm, near Sussex, on December 1st. (Middletown Times Herald, November 15, 1945)

Mrs. Sanford [sic] Margarum is in Linn Hospital, Sussex, where she underwent a major operation Monday. (Middletown Times Herald, February 19, 1947)

Theodore Margarum, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ford Margarum, left last week for Blair Academy. (Sussex Independent, October 1, 1942)

Isabel Adams Willson

WILLSON — Isabel Adams, at Sussex, N.J., on April 22, 1970. Beloved wife of M. Lawrence Willson, mother of John A. and Lawrence D., grandmother of Lawrence Adams and Barbara Lynn Willson, daughter of the late Elihu Adams and Mary Margarum. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the American Cancer Society or your favorite charity. Services at the First Presbyterian Church, Sussex, N.J., on Saturday at 2 P.M.

Source:  New York Times, April 23, 1970.

Ford W. Margarum Wedded in Newark

Miss Marion L. Robertson Bride of Sussex Man

In the presence of 300 guests, at the home of the bride, 21 Walnut street, Newark, N.J., Tuesday evening, at 8 o’clock, Miss Marion L. Robertson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel E. Robertson, and Ford W. Margarum, of Sussex, N.J., were united in marriage by the Rev. Dr. Robert Scott Inglis.  The bride was given away by her father.

Dr. H.J. Harp, of Sussex, N.J., was best man and Alan G. Robertson, of Newark, brother of the bride, and Theodore Holbert, of Sussex, acted as ushers.

The maid of honor was Miss Marie W. Robertson, sister of the bride.  She wore a pretty dress of silver lace, blue chiffon taffeta embroidered in silver.  She carried pink chrysanthemums tied with silver.

The bridesmaids, who were Alice Linn, of Sussex, and Amanda W. Northrop, of Newark, wore gowns of pink satin with foundations of silver cloth and silver lace flounces.  They carried pink chrysanthemums tied with silver.

Isabel Adams, niece of the groom, was the flower girl.  She wore a dress of white net and carried a basket of yellow tea roses.

The bride work a beautiful gown of silver tissue worked over bridal silver crepe with Grecian pattern silver lace trimmed all over, draped skirt and waist of net and silver lace.  The train was of very sheer georgette crepe, trimmed with silver lace, a mass of bridal silk maline, worked in, giving a picturesque effect.  Her flowers were bridal roses and lilies-of-the-valley.

A sister of the groom, Mrs. H.J. Harp, was gowned in white net over white satin with iridescent trimming.

The house was artistically decorated with chrysanthemums, southern smilax, palms and white roses.  Music was furnished by a harp, violin and cello.

A platinum bar pin with diamonds was the gift of the groom to the bride.

The couple will make their future home in Sussex, where the groom is president of the Farmers’ National Bank.

Mr. Margarum is well known in this city, being a member of Middletown Lodge, No. 1097, B.P.O.E.

Source:  Middletown Times Press, November 29, 1916

Samuel Bascom Babbitt

Born April 29, 1844.

Served in the U.S. Signal Corps in the war. Was a clerk in a country store with his father-in-law until 1879, his wife having died a year before. He then went to Kansas, purchased a farm and with his brother Charles cultivated it. In 1889 was married to Parthenia Margarum whose family lived in Stockholm, New Jersey; going on the farm located in Clyde, Cloud Co., Kansas (Charles having moved to another farm in Miltonvale, same county). In 1889, sold the farm and located in Worthington, Franklin County, Ohio. In Dec. 1904 was appointed Postmaster in Worthington serving four years; because of failing health resigned, turning the office over to his successor in Dec., 1909; is now living in Worthington without business. As a boy he attended the country district school during the winter terms, and in 1861 taught a three months’ term in one of these districts; also in 1862 and 1863. Was also one of the Ohio squirrel hunters who went to Cincinnati in 1863 after John Morgan’s raiders.

Married (1st) Elizabeth Ann Johnston, June 7, 1868. Died June 7, 1878.
Married (2nd) March 7, 1889 Parthenia Margarum. No children.

Source: Browne, William Bradford. 1912. The Babbitt Family History: 1643-1900. Taunton, MA: C.A. Hack & Son.

The Police Blotter

A young man named Seymour Glandon was arrested in Ashland Tuesday by Deputy Sheriff Logan on a warrant from Polk county, where he is wanted to answer on a charge of seduction. (The Oregonian, October 7, 1886)

Sussex Courts open. Continue but four days. One trial of note was Jacob Kimble vs. James R. Inglis, for seduction of daughter. Verdict $300. (Newspaper Clippings from the Sussex Register. 1887-1899. Newton, N.J.: The Register. Originally published August 15, 1837)

Miller, S.D., March 19. — The sheriff has brought in Willard Davis, charged with store breaking. Dave and John Rorick have also been arrested. It develops that an organized band has been operating here for some time. (Bismarck Tribune, March 19, 1894, and  Aberdeen Daily News, March 19, 1894)

BURGLARIES IN DECKERTOWN: Burglars were at work in Deckertown, Wednesday night. They entered the residence of Mayor Margarum and ransacked the lower part of the house, but only got $6, which they took from Miss Mary Margarum’s purse. (Middletown Daily Argus, March 23, 1894)

Levi Lateer was arrested, to-day, on the charge of keeping a disorderly house in the North End. He pleased not guilty and demanded a jury trial, and gave bail for his appearance from trial on Friday. (Middletown Daily Argus, August 31, 1896)

The case against of the people vs. Levi Lateer, charged with keeping a disorderly house at the North End, was called before the Recorder this morning. The defendant was discharged, the complainant failing to put in an appearance. (Middletown Daily Argus, September 22, 1896)

Mrs. Thelma B. Brown, 41, of 808 Luck avenue was fined $10 and court costs Thursday in Municipal Court after she pleaded guilty to a charge of reckless operation. Mrs. Brown was charged Wednesday after she parked her auto and opened her car door into the path of a car driven by Charles F. Hutchinson, 35, of 739 Homewood. The accident occurred on Homewood avenue. (Zanesville Times Recorder, February 28, 1964)

Birth Announcements

To the wife of Merle Ansberry, September 5, a daughter, Eleanor Allyne, Hanford.  (Oakland Tribune, September 18, 1933)

NEW ARMSTRONG SON:  Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Armstrong are parents of a boy born Monday Jan. 29 at the St. Ann hospital, Algona.  Mrs. Armstrong is the former Dorothy Fish, and the Armstrongs have one other son, Melvin.  Mr. Armstrong works for the Post transfer company at Algona.  The family moved lately from Livermore to the Obrecht home here.  (Kossuth County Advance, February 6, 1951)

Born yesterday to Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Bryant of 924 East Church street a daughter, Marilyn Jeanne.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 29, 1925)

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Chapin of Pontiac, formerly of Lake Orion, are receiving congratulations on the birth of a son, Mark Steven, Tuesday, January 29th, at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Pontiac.  Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Glen McNeil of Lake Orion and Mrs. Margaret Chapin of Pontiac.  (Lake Orion Review, February 1, 1952)

The daughter born at Bethesda hospital to Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Chesser of Fultonham has been named Pamela Kay.  Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Asa Brown and Mrs. Helen Newport, all of Crooksville, and great-grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Gage Frash of Crooksville.  (Zanesville Signal, November 25, 1953)

Mr. and Mrs. Tracy E. Decker of Johnson announce the birth of a son, Tracy, Jr., February eleventh.  (Middletown Times-Herald, February 17, 1930)

September 8 — To Mr. and Mrs. Wellington Edmison, 1229 Stillwater street, twin daughters.  (Nebraska State Journal, September 9, 1910)

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Francis are the parents of a son, born Monday June 11.  (Lake Orion Review, June 15, 1945)

Mrs. Dorothy Fritz of Lake Orion and Mrs. Magdalena Friedrich of Pirmansen, Germany, are both grandmothers for the first time, but Mrs. Fritz won’t get to see little Richard Lyle, Jr., for quite a while.  He was born overseas, where his father is stationed with the Army.  The baby was born August 27 and weighed eight pounds, ten ounces.  His parents are Cpl. and Mrs. Richard Lyle Fritz.  (Lake Orion Review, September 8, 1960)

Mr. and Mrs. Marion Hanson of Junction City, a son, at Good Samaritan, Feb. 2.  (Zanesville Times Recorder, February 3, 1960)

Mr. and Mrs. Marion Hanson of Junction City, a son, at Good Samaritan, Jan. 28.  (Zanesville Times Recorder, January 30, 1962)

The son born June 9 to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Henning has been named Joel Augustus.  Grandmothers are Mrs. Rachel Henning of Roseville Route 2 and Mrs. Leone Robison of Roseville.  The couple has a 17-year old son, Kevin.  (Zanesville Times Recorder, June 23, 1972)

Congratulations are being extended to Mr. and Mrs. Ralph C. Hird (Harriett Carol Rorick) who are the parents of a daughter born August 6 in Daytona Beach, Fla.  Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. J.T. Rorick of Portland and Mrs. Dwight Beebe of Englewood, N.J.  (Portland Oregonian, August 8, 1946)

Congratulations are being received by Mr. and Mrs. John B. Jarrell, of Centreville, on the birth of a 6 lb. 8 oz. boy, Francis Henry, at Chestertown Hospital, June 27, 1943.  Mrs. Jarrell was formerly Miss Ruth Doty, of Greensboro.  (Denton Journal, July 9, 1943)

CHILD IN MARGARUM HOME:  Little Janette Robertson Margarum arrived in town at 5 o’clock on Sunday afternoon at the Margarum home on Bank Street, and the household was made very happy.  Mayor Margarum has been receiving congratulations ever since at the Farmers’ Bank and elsewhere.  (Middletown Times-Press, February 9, 1918)

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Margarum of Unionville are parents of twins, a boy and a girl, born at Horton hospital on November nineteenth.  (Middletown Times-Herald, November 23, 1945)

Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Mason, formerly Helen McIntosh, announce the birth of a daughter this morning at their home in South Second street.  Grandfather and grandmother J.S. Mason of Eddy street are wearing smiles that won’t rub off.  (Newark Advocate, August 12, 1915)

MORRIS, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Earl (Inez Jessie Edmison), 360 North Twenty-seventy street, girl, Oct. 2.  (Nebraska State Journal, October 3, 1933)

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Pearson, of Voorheis Lake, announce the birth of a son, William Anthony, June 21, at St. Joseph’s Mercy Hospital, Pontiac. He weighed 7 lbs. 5 ozs. Mrs. Pearson is the former Ruth Alleman. (Lake Orion Review, June 29, 1945)

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Pearson, Jr. (Ruth Alleman) of Oxford, are the parents of a daughter, Ellen Rae, weighing 8 lbs., 9 ozs. She was born Saturday, December 13, at St. Joseph’s Mercy Hospital, Pontiac. (Lake Orion Review, December 19, 1947)

We failed last week to note the advent of a little girl baby at the home of Sid Rorick.  Weight, seven pounds.  Mother and child doing well.  (Oxford Mirror, October 22, 1886)

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Steves of Pilot Hill are the parents of a baby girl born at the Highland Hospital, Auburn, Saturday, April 29.  Mrs. Steves, as Jane Owens, lived here several years ago with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. L.D. Owens.  (Mountain Democrat, May 11, 1950)

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Sutton, 176 West Main Street, Port Jervis, are the parents of a girl born in St. Francis Hospital Saturday.  (Middletown Times-Herald, May 26, 1947)

Born — In this city, January 2, 1894, to Mr. and Mrs. Enos Walling, a daughter.  (Idaho Statesman, January 3, 1894)

Boy to wife of Nelson Walling, 990 East Stark street.  (Portland Oregonian, September 2, 1899)