Masonic Lodges and Y.M.C.A. Friendship Club To Officiate At Funeral For Dr. J.W. Garth

Philanthropist and Capitalist Succumbs Monday.

Funeral services for Dr. J.W. Garth, widely known physician and philanthropist, who died here early this morning, will be held at the residence, 1347 Calder, at 2:30 Wednesday afternoon, with Rev. Samuel Rosinger of Temple Emmanuel, and Rev. Samuel Holden, Congregational pastor, in charge.

Masonic Lodge No. 286 and the Beaumont Commandery, No. 38 Knights Templar will also have a part in the services. Burial will be in Magnolia cemetery under the direction of Roberts Undertaking company.

Tyrrell public library, donated to the city by Capt. W.C. Tyrrell and with which Dr. Garth was closely associated, will be closed from 2:30 to 4, the time of the funeral.

Continue reading “Masonic Lodges and Y.M.C.A. Friendship Club To Officiate At Funeral For Dr. J.W. Garth”

Advertisements

Dr. J.W. Garth, Friend Of Youth, Dies At His Home

Man Who Erected Friendship Building at Y.M.C.A. Succumbs After Year Of Invalidism

Dr. J.W. Garth, age 62, benefactor of youth, died at his home, 1347 Calder avenue, shortly after midnight this morning. Hope was abandoned yesterday even for a temporary recovery, after he had lain in a state of coma for 24 hours. Keeping vigil at the bedside were three sons, James, Tyrrell and Thomas Garth, all of Beaumont, and another son, Dr. Leroy Garth was speeding to his father’s home from California.

A telegram was received last night from Dr. Leroy Garth, who had then reached San Antonio. Dr. W.E. Tatum, family physician and associate in business with Dr. Garth, was also present. Doctor Garth, who had lain helpless for more than a year, clung to life tenaciously and always maintained a cheery disposition.

Continue reading “Dr. J.W. Garth, Friend Of Youth, Dies At His Home”

Capt. W.C. Tyrrell Will Be Buried Here Probably Wednesday

His Benefactions and How He Made Fortune Recalled; Brought First Ship to Beaumont

Funeral services for Capt. W.C. Tyrrell, prominent citizen and philanthropist, who died at his residence at 1347 Calder avenue early Sunday morning, probably will be held Wednesday afternoon, according to tentative arrangements. It is likely that the Masonic lodge will have charge of services at the grave.

The body was prepared for burial yesterday and lay in state at the family residence throughout the day where it was viewed by hundreds of friends and associates of the deceased.

It is believed that Captain Tyrrell’s death occurred about 12:45 a.m. and that his death, which was caused by heart failure, was peaceful and without suffering. He was found by his son-in-law, Dr. J.W. Garth, at 1:15 a.m. and it was evident at that time that he had been dead about half an hour.

Continue reading “Capt. W.C. Tyrrell Will Be Buried Here Probably Wednesday”

Tyrrell Family Has Reunion At Lakes

W.C. Tyrrell of Beaumont, Texas, and some twenty or thirty of his relatives, among them C.H. Tyrrell, Jr., and family and Dr. and Mrs. C.A. Fillgraf of Spencer, are enjoying a most delightful family reunion in cottages rented for the purpose near the drawbridge on West Okoboji lake in Iowa, says a Belmond paper. W.C. Tyrrell, whom his intimate friends call “Captain,” is staging the party and is renting the Pattee cottage for the month of the July and the gathering is making its headquarters there. Every known form of enjoyment the lakes afford are indulged in by the guests. There is golf for those who like and W.C. Tyrrell does. He took up the game at the age of 63 and now shoots most of the courses in less than a hundred. Dancing, swimming, boating, motoring and other forms of amusement, to say nothing of wonderful eats, help to cause the time to pass all too quickly.

Those in the party in addition to W.C. Tyrrell are: Dr. M. Brink and wife of Boyde, Iowa, G.P. Tyrrell and wife of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, C.H. Tyrrell and wife of Sioux Rapids, Dr. G.W. [sic] Garth and wife of Beaumont, Texas, David Rorick and family of Ocean Side [sic], California, Thomas Garth and wife of Beaumont, Texas, J.W. Garth, Jr., who drove through from Tulsa, Oklahoma, Clifford Fields of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Will C. Tyrrell, Jr., president of a sugar company at Belmond, Iowa, and his son, Will C. Tyrrell III, and daughter Carol, and C.H. Tyrrell, Jr., and Dr. and Mrs. C.A. Fillgraf of Spencer. W.C. Tyrrell, host to the party, is one of the big boosters for Texas. He has been engaged in the oil business for a number of years.

Source: Beaumont Enterprise, July 23, 1923.

Tyrrell Garth Weds Los Angeles Girl; Will Reside Here

That Miss Lucy Langdon of Los Angeles and Tyrrell Garth of this city, son of Dr. and Mrs. J.W. Garth and grandson of Capt. W.C. Tyrrell, were united in marriage December 26 is the news reaching Beaumont, where the groom’s family is prominently identified.

The wedding was solemnized at the bride’s home and among other relatives presents were Capt. Tyrrell and Mrs. Garth.

Mr. and Mrs. Garth are now at the Hotel Maryland, Pasadena, where they plan an extended stay.

Mr. Garth is connected with the Tyrrell-Combest company and has many friends here who will give his bride a cordial welcome, she being pleasantly remembered as a visitor in the Garth home about a year ago when she accompanied her grandfather to Beaumont, he being an old-time Iowa friend of Capt. Tyrrell’s.

Source:  Beaumont Enterprise, January 2, 1922.

Guests at Tyrrell Home.

The W.C. Tyrrell home, 1347 Calder, is the scene of a pleasant family gathering, Capt. Tyrrell’s sons and daughters and grand-children coming from far and near to Beaumont to help him celebrate his 73rd birthday anniversary, which occurred Saturday. Present are: W.C. Tyrrell of Belmond, Ia.; H.C. Tyrrell of Tulsa; Mr. and Mrs. David Rorick of Oceanside, Cal.; Dr. and Mrs. M. Brink of Boyden, Iowa; Mr. and Mrs. D.H. Leonard of Clarion, Iowa, Clifford Field of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and Dr. and Mrs. J.W. Garth.

Source: Beaumont Enterprise, January 19, 1920.

Tyrrell Rites To Be Monday

BEAUMONT, July 24.—William Casper Tyrrell, 71,will be buried in Magnolia cemetery after funeral services here Monday morning. He died of heart disease and pneumonia Thursday night at his summer home in Belmond, Iowa, and the body is en route to Beaumont.

President of the Tyrrell trust, he was engaged in a variety of business enterprises.  Among his philanthropies was assistance to Tyrrell library, given to Beaumont as its first public library by his father, Captain W.C. Tyrrell.

A native of Rowan, Iowa, he was educated in the public schools of Belmond and the University of Iowa.  He came to Beaumont with his parents in 1901, and had made this his residence and the center of his activities since that time.

Surviving are his wife, Ella; four sons, Harry and W. Preston Tyrrell of Beaumont, Lt. David C. Tyrrell of Norfolk, Va., and William  Casper Tyrrell, Jr., of Belmond; a daughter, Mrs. Wesley W. Kyle, Jr., of Beaumont; a brother, Harry C. Tyrrell of Tulsa; and a sister, Mrs. J.W. Garth of Beaumont; and several grandchildren.

Source:  Port Arthur News, July 24, 1943.

Katherine Sample, David C. Tyrrell Are Married In St. Mark’s Church

The wedding of Katherine Gregg Sample and David Christie Tyrrell of Philadelphia, one of the most beautiful ever attended by Shreveport society, took place at 8 o’clock Tuesday evening in St. Mark’s Episcopal church. The ceremony was performed Rev. Dr. James M. Owens assisted by the Rev. Anson Phelps Stokes, Jr. After the service a formal reception was held in the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Guy Sample, on Jordan street.

The chancel was aisled with many calla lilies in high standards, woodwardia and multiple cathedral tapers in seven-arm candelabra.

While the guest were assembling, Mrs. H.R. Moore presented a nuptial recital—a half hour of organ music including “To An Evening Star” and the Prelude from Act III of “Lohengrin” (Wagner); “Nuptial Song” (DuBois) and “Cantable (Wilder), at the conclusion of which the vested choir of St. Mark’s entered in procession singing “The Voice That Breathes O’er Eden” followed by the playing of the Bridal Chorus from “Lohengrin” marked the entrance of the bridal party, an evening hymn was improvised during the service and the recessional was Mendelsohn’s “Wedding March”

First to enter were the groomsmen and ushers, Mr. Oliver Sample, Mr. Morton McMahon, Mr. Wilton Sample and Mr. Staunton Sample.

The graceful single file of brides-matrons include the bridegroom’s sister, Mrs. Carol Tyrrell Gilmore of Beaumont, Mrs. James A. Bolton of Alexandria and Mrs. Frances W. Scott, sister of the bride. They were facsimile gowns of amber-gold silk net tucked and fitted from yoke to hemline with circular ruching edging the shoulder capelet and floor-length skirt. The apple green velvet of their wide sashes matched the velvet ribbon bows on their formal bouquets of yellow calla lilies.

Similarly made of silk net tucked and ruched, but of pastel blue, was the gown of the lovely blonde maid of honor, Miss Betty Robinson. Her sash and the streamers of her yellow calla lilies bouquet were of lapis lazuli blue velvet.

The bride entering with her father, Mr. Samuel Guy Sample, who was to give her in marriage, appeared very beautiful in her Tafel wedding gown of old ivory stain fashioned calyx-like with a high corded collar[,] long tight sleeves tapering to a point and rows of covered buttons from elbow to wrist and from neckline to waist at the back. A veil of illusion caught to her dark hair with a shallow cap of Chantilly lace and a fillet of orange blossoms, extended the length of her long court train. She carried a formal bouquet of white calla lilies and calla leaves tied with white satin.

They were met at the chancel steps by the bridegroom and his best man, his brother, Mr. William C. Tyrrell, of Belmond, Iowa, who, like the groomsmen wore the bride’s favor, a gardenia boutonniere.

Mrs. Samuel Guy Sample chose for her daughter’s wedding a gown of gold brocaded lame. The groom’s mother, Mrs. William C. Tyrrell of Beaumont, wore a white brilliant-beaded gown with a formal train.

At the reception following, the guests were received in the hallway of the Sample home by Mrs. Douglas A. Lee and Mr. J. Reese Jones. In the drawing rooms, which were decorated with innumerable spring flowers, were the bride and groom and their attendants, Miss Robinson with Mr. William C. Tyrrell, Mrs. Bolton with Mr. Wilton Sample, Mrs. Gilmore and Mr. Oliver Sample, Mrs. Scott with Mr. Staunton Sample, and Mr. Morton McMahon; the hosts, Mr. and Mrs. Sample with Mr. and Mrs. William C. Tyrrell, Sr., Mr. James A. Bolton and Mrs. William C. Tyrrell, Jr., Francis W. Scott and Mrs. J.W. Garth of Beaumont; and Mr. and Mrs. Harry C. Tyrrell of Beaumont; Mr. and Mrs. Sidney J. Harman; Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Jones, Miss Elsie Jones and Mrs. B.M. Bryan of Washington, D.C.

In the dining room the bride’s table was centered with a tiered wedding cake crowned with a spray of valley lilies. At the ends of the lace-covered oval were identical punch bowls of antique silver, gold lined. On buffet and serving tables were pale yellow souvenir roses and ivory tapers in silvel [sic] candelabra. Ices in yellow rose molds, little tiered sandwiches and embossed cakes and confections were served. Presiding or assisting in the dining room were Miss Lena Jones, Mrs. Delia Gahagan, Mrs. Hill Shepherd, Miss Minnie Well, Miss Nora Laskey, Mrs. Walter B. Chandler, Miss Josephine Hardin and Mrs. Samuel Webb Smith.

Later in the evening the bridal couple left for their honeymoon in New York City, Mrs. Tyrrell wearing a very smart costume suit of ruby-tone crepe with collar, cuffs and pockets of kolinsky and a peaked toque. They are to arrive in Philadelphia in a fortnight where they will have an apartment at Bryn Mawr Gables, Bryn Mawr, PA. Their attractive remembrances to their attendants were lame evening bags from the bride and leather travel cases from the groom.

Katherine Sample Tyrrell is the younger daughter of prominent parents and one of the most charming young personalities in society. She is a Junior Leaguer, a graduate of Gardner School in New York and a former student of the National Cathedral School in Washington, D.C.

Mr. Tyrrell, the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. William Casper Tyrrell, is a member of a noteworthy Texas and Iowa family. He was educated in the east and is a graduate of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. His fraternity is Sigma Chi.

Notable among out-of-town guests were Mr. and Mrs. J. Cooke Wilson of Beaumont.

Source: Shreveport Times, January 27, 1935.

Small Town News from Various Points

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Barclay, of East Ferry avenue, and their guests, Mrs. J. Ford Sutton and Mr. I. Hickman, who have been at their summer home at Bay View, Mich., returned home. (Detroit Free Press, December 9, 1917).

The following officers were elected by the Laurel Run borough school board: President, E.N. Johnson; vice president, Evan Griffith; secretary, Benjamin Belles; treasurer, Edward Chubb; solicitor, Chaz. Loveland. (Wilkes-Barre Times, December 11, 1907)

Dr. Rorick Bennett, and her daughter, Mrs. Clark, who have been occupying the Tilden residence [in Kensington, MD] for the past year, expect to return to Detroit, their former home, in the next year. (Washington Post, November 21, 1915)

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dilts have left for Morristown, N.J., where Mr. Dilts will begin his law practice. A June graduate of the University of Michigan law school, Mr. Dilts passed his Iowa bar examination Saturday. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Dilts, 1212 Lincoln way. (Ames Daily Tribune, June 27, 1950)

Lincoln—Mrs. Russell Gallagher of Colon, Canal Zone, was a guest here Sunday at the home of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Walling. Mrs. Gallagher (Marjorie Walling), formerly lived in this neighborhood and attended the school here. Miss Gertrude Walling of Portland was also a guest at the Walling home Sunday and was accompanied back to Portland by Mrs. Gallagher. (Daily Capital Journal, June 20, 1934)

Mr. and Mrs. Harper Gallup of Detroit spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Gallup. (Ann Arbor News, December 4, 1917)

Miss Hazel Gallup has returned from Union City and will spend the summer at her home here. Mr. and Mrs. Harper Gallup of Detroit were guests of Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Gallup over the week-end. (Ann Arbor News, June 25, 1918)

REDDING, Aug. 11. — Mrs. E. Gardner, wife of a prominent dentist of this city, killed a black bear weighing 450 pounds on Noshana Creek, near Gregory, yesterday. While strolling from camp, rifle in hand, she saw two bears facing her in the road. The animals started towards her and she raised the rifle and shot one dead in its tracks. The other escaped. Mrs. Gardner’s daughter, Mrs. A.F. Dobrowsky, bagged three buck deer the same day. (San Jose Mercury News, August 11, 1905)

THIRTY YEARS AGO (1929): Mrs. Rose Garth who returned Friday from a visit with Dr. and Mrs. J.W. Garth at Beaumont, Texas brought with her the $1,000 donation “Dr. Will” made to the Clarion Library. (Wright County Monitor, November 19, 1959)

Misses Blanche Hightower and Agnes Devin were visitors to Bellingham on Friday. (Bellingham Herald, May 15, 1910)

Miss Eva Johnson, who has been motoring through the Willamette valley and has visited at the John Walling ranch, near Salem, is expected home today. Miss Elva Johnson has returned from a fortnight’s visit on Sauvies’ Island, where she was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Paquet at their Oak Grove Ridge ranch. (Portland Oregonian, September 2, 1915)

The Misses Eva and Elva Johnson are at Yaquina Bay, enjoying the salmon trolling. They are the guests of their aunt, Mrs. W.M. Toner. (Portland Oregonian, September 6, 1916)

Mr. J.W. Linderman is entertaining Mr. J. Sutton, of Cheboygan. (Detroit Free Press, February 22, 1855)

James W. Garth

Beaumont, Nov. 26 (AP) — Dr. J.W. Garth, 62, widely known southeast Texas philanthropist and donor of a building to newsboys in connection with the new Y.M.C.A here, died today after a long illness. He came from Iowa two years ago.

Source: Port Arthur News, November 26, 1929.