Former Beckwith Business Man Visits Quincy Monday

M.F. Loosley, for a number of years in business at Beckwith and now located at Klamath Falls, Oregon, came to Quincy Monday to attend to various matters of business. Mr. Loosley was accompanied by his son Harold and wife of Beckwith, another son, Edwin [sic], of Portola, and his daughter, Vena [sic], who has been at Portola for some time with her brother and family. Loosley senior plans to remain in the county several days and then journey to San Francisco where he will be joined by Mrs. Loosley and remain a week or more.

Source: Feather River Bulletin, May 14, 1925.

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Short News Items from 1921

John Armstrong, of Rochester, was here on Saturday to attend the funeral of his aunt, Mrs. Lucy Reynolds. (Yates County Chronicle, March 2, 1921)

A.E. Spiers came in from his ranch home in the Igo section and transacted business in the city today. (Red Bluff Daily News, April 15, 1921)

Mrs. Jas. Buchanan, nee Bonice Loosley, of Petaluma, arrived at Beckwith Wednesday to spend a short vacation with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. M.F. Loosley. (Feather River Bulletin, June 23, 1921)

M.F. Loosley returned Tuesday from a business trip to San Francisco and vicinity. (Feather River Bulletin, June 23, 1921)

Mrs. Leonard Hallinan, who has been visiting her mother, Mrs. Albert Walling, at Rockaway, stopped over with relatives in Oswego while on her way to her home in Redland. (Oregon Daily Journal, June 25, 1921)

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Hallinan and son Cecil stopped over with Mr. Hallinan’s mother on their way home from a motor trip to Seattle and Sound cities. (Oregon Daily Journal, September 18, 1921)

Bridge Party

Mrs. George Loosley entertained the younger set at bridge at her home on Oak street Monday afternoon, in honor of her daughter, Mrs. Kay Loosley. Mrs. H.K. Tomlinson won highest score and was awarded first prize, which consisted of a sack of Klamath county potatoes. The consolidation prize, a bouquet of flowers went to Mrs. P.K. Hammond.

Source: Ashland Weekly Tidings, April 28, 1920.

Short News Items from 1919

O.D. Tilley and J.H. Voss have been very ill with the influenza. (Twin Falls News, January 8, 1919)

Mrs. E.H. Rorick of Fayette was stricken with paralysis last Sunday afternoon. She has lost the use of her right side. (Fulton County Tribune, March 14, 1919)

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Rochelle and daughter returned home Saturday to their home in Wichita after completing the new elevator at Beaver. (Hoisington Dispatch, April 17, 1919)

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Short News Items from 1918

Cecil Low, Garner Lundy and Ira Orem will leave Thursday to take their entrance examinations for the United States navy. Low has previously been in the cavalry, but was discharged, owing to illness, and will now enter the naval service. (Klamath Falls Evening Herald, May 15, 1918)

Walter Domrose, Roland Stricker and Orla [sic] Tilley have all been listed in the next draft and are expecting notification any day. All are employed in the harvest fields and had hoped to be left till the crops were in. (Twin Falls News, June 19, 1918)

HALLSTEAD, Pa., Aug. 29.—Rev. James Bryden, of Dorranceton, Pa., is spending his vacation at the home of his son, Rev. Lewis Bryden, of Pine street.  (Scranton Republican, August 30, 1918)

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Short News Items from 1917

Edward Loosley is over from Montague for a few days, visiting G.W. Loosley and other relatives and friends. He is connected with the Loosley-Lwinell Company over in Northern California and says all kinds of prosperity exists over there. (Ashland Tidings, January 4, 1917)

Dr. Mae Rochelle returned to her home at K.C., after spending a couple of weeks with Mrs. W.P. Lynch. (Delphos Republican, January 19, 1917)

Mrs. Albert Holbein, of Dover, is visiting her sister, Miss Mary Hains, of this city. (Zanesville Times Recorder, January 31, 1917)

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Business & Professional Notices from 1917

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Farmers’ National Bank was held at the banking rooms in Sussex Tuesday afternoon. Directors elected were: Charles G. Wilson, Theodore F. Northrup, Frank Holbert, Samuel S. Vandruff, Elihu Adams, William A. Roy, James R. Kincaid, Ford W. Margarum, J. Merritt Willson. The directors organized by electing Ford W. Margarum president; Frank Holbert, cashier; and Theodore M. Holbert, assistant cashier. (Middletown Times Press, January 13, 1917)

The big store is now conducted by M.F. Loosley and sons. The three sons, Harold A., Edward and Harry R., assuming a partnership with their father dating from January 1, 1917. (Portola Sentinel, January 27, 1917)

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Business & Professional Notices from 1911

KLAMATH FALLS, Or., April 13. — (Special.) — Marion F. Loosley, a pioneer of the Wood River Valley at the north end of Upper Klamath Lake, has just closed a deal with M.L. Erickson, supervisor of the Crater National Forest, for the purchase of 30,000,000 feet of fine timber on that forest reserve. The land lies on Seven-Mile Creek and embraces 2500 acres heavily timbered with yellow and sugar pine, Douglas and white fir. The price paid for the timber is: Yellow and sugar pine, $3.25 per thousand; Douglas fir, $2.25, and white fir, $1.35. Mr. Loosley was formerly in the sawmill business on a small scale in the Wood River Valley, but for several years devoted his attention to cattle raising. It is understood that he has ordered machinery to establish a mill on Seven-Mile Creek to cut up the timber he has purchased. The mill is to be within a short distance of the edge of the lake, where water transportation can be had near the Oregon Trunk road, which is surveyed through from Medford to tap the big timber belt north of here. (Portland Oregonian, April 14, 1911)

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Business & Professional Notices from the 1910s

Harry J. Northrup, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Northrup, of 222 Mansion street, who is connected with the office of the division engineer of the State Highway Department, has been transferred to construction work on new state roads now being built at Kenoza Lake, Sullivan County, where he will probably be located the greater part of the summer. (Poughkeepsie Eagle-News, May 22, 1912)

To the loss of Zephyrhills and the gain of Jacksonville is what happened last Friday when Rev. M.D. Fuller and wife left for the latter place, where Rev. Fuller takes charge of the Perry Avenue M.E. Church, the coming year. These good people have spent several winters in our midst and although Mr. Fuller was not the pastor of the Methodist Church here, he was a great and most learned worker for the cause. His face will be greatly missed on each Sunday to come. (Tampa Tribune, January 24, 1915)

Mr. and Mrs. F.M. Loosley, from Seattle, have moved to Beckwith. F.M. is a son of M.F. Loosley and will have charge of the new garage of M.F. Loosley and sons. We extend a hearty welcome to Mr. and Mrs. F.M. Loosley. (Feather River Bulletin, June 5, 1919)

Business & Professional Notices from 1908

Master Signal Electrician MILAN A. LOOSLEY, Fort Wood, N.Y., will be sent to Denver, Colo., to relieve Master Signal Electrician JOHN F. DILLON, who upon relief will be sent to Fort Wood, N.Y. (Washington Herald, April 30, 1908)

Jesse Walling threshed 2,350 bushels of wheat from 63 acres of new land that was in sagebrush last year, says the Nampa Record-Herald. (Idaho Recorder, September 3, 1908)