Congratulated by Wilson

Wallace D. McLean Weds Miss Ada Rorick McConnell at Adrian.

ADRIAN, MICH.—One of the season’s most notable weddings was celebrated here when Miss Ada Rorick McConnell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.C. McConnell, was married to Wallace D. McLean, of Washington and New York city.

At Princeton the groom studied under President Wilson and is a personal friend of the Wilson family. Congratulatory letters have been received from President Wilson and his daughter, Miss Margaret Wilson.

Source: Clare Sentinel, October 8, 1915.


Cleantha McConnell Taken By Death

The many Wauseon friends of Cleantha McConnel [sic] of Adrian, Mich., granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. John C. Rorick will learn with sincere regret of her death which occurred Monday night at 9:30.

Miss McConnel’s death was the result of influenza, she had been sick only one week and one day.

Miss McConnel was to have been married to Wyllis Osborn Dodge of Lansing, Mich.

She was often a visitor in the home of her grand-parents here and had a large circle of friends among the young people of Wauseon.

Mr. and Mrs. Rorick attended the funeral services in Adrian Thursday afternoon.

Source: Fulton County Tribune, April 11, 1919.

John C. Rorick

A Long and Active Life

Varied Experiences – Pioneer and Patriot – Services to His Community and State – Honored by Fellow Citizens and Associates

John C. Rorick was born near Elmira, New York, February 13th, 1834, died at his home in Wauseon, December 8th, 1920; between these two dates there is a period of nearly eighty seven years; a long life time and filled with a variety of experiences beyond the average of those which come to the lives of American citizens. Mr. Rorick was of a sturdy stock remarkable for its longevity and as well for its initiative and energy in service to its time and place.

William Rorick, his father, was of German parentage, as a young man of twenty-five he made the trip from New Jersey to Elmira on foot and six years later he was a member of the “Westward Ho” which people this section of the country with those pioneers of indomitable spirit and will who have conquered the wilderness and gave it as a heritage to their successors in the generation that followed. William Rorick made the trip from New York to Lenawee County, Michigan, with his little family in a covered wagon in 1836, he died at the age of 93. The mother who shared the adventure and the task of her pioneer husband, was Phoebe Breese, from the same family came such men as Judge Sidney Brees of Illinois, and Samuel Finley Breese Morse, the inventor of the telegraph.

The characteristic traits of his ancestry are evident throughout the life history of Mr. Rorick.

In the days of his boyhood, society made but meagre provision for the school training; but his undaunted determination led him to work out his own training and education by supplementing the meagre school advantages with his own persistent effort to acquire for himself the knowledge essential to successful and useful living: One and one half terms at Medina Seminary in Tenawee [sic] County and a rather meagre course in Commerce in Gregory’s Commercial College of Detroit formed the framework upon which Mr. Rorick by his own study at home and constant search for information wrought out for himself what was recognized by those who knew him as a liberal education. To the last days of his activity he was constant in effort to add to his fund of information, so it was indeed true that with him education was the process of a lifetime.

The pioneer spirit and versatility of his character is exemplified in an outline of his life’s activities.

At the age of eighteen he began teaching school; in 1854 he was in the Lake Superior Copper country as “Boss of the Kilns” at the Ridge Mine Ontonagon; returning to the states in company with two other young men on snow shoes 250 miles through unbroken wilderness with only a chart and compass to guide them; he again took up the occupation of teaching, giving instruction in writing, drawing and bookkeeping in Madison, Wisconsin and towns in that vicinity. In 1855 he in company with Dan Howard, a noted pen artist, charactered the first Commercial College in the State of Wisconsin, located in the city of Milwaukee; Mr. Rorick’s position in this school being the professor of the science of accounts and Commercial Law. He became proficient in pen drawing and his work in this line was awarded premiums in art exhibits in Chicago and elsewhere. Selling out his interest in the Commercial College in Milwaukee, he retired to Aurora, Illinois and in 1860 returned to Michigan. In 1862 December 15th, he was united in marriage to Miss Emma J. Whiting at Elmira, N.Y. returning to his home in Michigan with his bride. In 1864 he became the proprietor of the Sherman House in Wauseon. In 1866 he purchased the Morenci Hotel Morenci, Michigan, in 1867 he became the owner and operator of a Spoke Factory at Canandaigua, Michigan. In 1872 he moved to Wauseon where he resided to the date of his decease: In addition to the enterprises already alluded to he has been actively involved in agriculture, having owned 12 farms in Ohio, besides numerous others in the States of Michigan, Indiana, Iowa and Kansas. He was engaged in Commerce in Wauseon for a number of years as a member of the grocery firm of White and Rorick; he was also president of the Grayson Telephone Company of Sherman and Dennison, Texas with headquarters at Lima, Ohio.

Mr. Rorick has also distinguished himself as an inventor, having to his credit the following practical and useful inventions: The Rorick System of re-working butter, which went into use among shippers in 1878. The Quadrant Bevel Square; an improved Air Pad Truss and several other practical devices. He was also a frequent contributor to the press on political and social subjects.

In the field of public service Mr. Rorick has made himself a remarkable record. In Lenawee county Michigan he was called to serve as a member of the School Board and as Justice of the Peace; in Wauseon he has served as councilman, Mayor, President of the Board of Education and a township trustee. He has served the State of Ohio as a member of the Board of Equalization, in 1881 and again on the same board in 1901. He was elected State Senator from the 33rd Senatorial District in 1891 and was re-elected to this same position in 1893, serving two full terms as State Senator; for two years he served as a member of the Board of managers for the Ohio State Penitentiary. His last important public service was as a member of the Ohio State Constitutional Convention in which body he helped to frame the present Constitution of our State. To all of these positions whether great or small he brought a thorough knowledge of practical economics, a well balanced judgement, an unfailing energy, a true public spirit and unsevering fidelity to every trust reposed in him, by which he merited the confidence and esteem which his fellow citizens gave him.

In private life he was a loyal and faithful husband, a friend whose true friendship found expression in kindly deeds as well as words. He loved his fellowmen and loved to mingle with them. He found real pleasure in ministering to the comforts and pleasures of others. His long life is closed and his best monument is the record of a life well spent in service to humanity. He leaves in the circle of those nearest to him by family ties his faithful wife, companion and work-fellow for fifty-eight years; his adopted daughter, Mrs. W.C. McConnell of Adrian, Mich., a sister, Mrs. Converse of Adrian, Mich., and a brother, Dr. E.H. Rorick of Fayette.

Funeral services were held at the house on East Elm Street Saturday afternoon, Dec. 11th, Rev. Arthur E. Fish, pastor of the Congregational church officiating and Wauseon Lodge No. 156 Knights of Pythias, of which he was a member performing their burial service at the grave.

Mr. Rorick was at the time of his death Commander of the Associate Members of Losure Post G.A.R. Members of this Post were in attendance in a body at the funeral services.

Source: Fulton County Tribune, December 17, 1920.

William Murphy Dies

Retired Banker Here

William David Murphy, 71, of 2650 Martin Road, prominent retired Zanesville banker and civic leader, died at 9:43 a.m. Friday in Bethesda Hospital where he had been a patient since July 10.

Mr. Murphy was born Nov. 7, 1900, in Fayette, Ohio, a son of Dr. William and Nellie Murphy.

His family moved to Columbus when he was a boy and he attended schools there, graduating from Ohio State University in 1923. He studied law at Franklin University and passed the bar in 1928. While in school he helped himself financially by selling clothing, and as a messenger for Citizens Bank and Trust Company in Columbus. He remained with the bank when it merged with the Ohio National Bank.

When Ohio National started its branch program in the late 1920s, he served in various executive capacities and in 1929 the Banc-Ohio Corp. was formed and began buying banks in various cities. In 1930, when Citizens National was organized by the merger of four Zanesville banks, Murphy was assigned to Zanesville to supervise its promotion program. He was elected cashier and a member of the Citizens board of directors in May 1931, vice president and cashier in 1945, and president in January 1947, succeeding Henry J. Knoedler. Her retired Dec. 31, 1965, at the age of 65.

He had been an associate trustee of Bethesda Hospital; trustee, treasurer, and past president of the Muskingum Motor Club; and a trustee of the Abbot Home for Men. He was a past campaign chairman of the Community Fund. In 1961 he was appointed chairman of Ohio State University’s Development Fund and in 1966 served as chairman of the Muskingum Area Trade School campaign finance committee.

He was a member and elder of Central Presbyterian Church, a former member of the trustees and past president of the church Brotherhoods; a member of the Rotary Club, Zanesville Country Club, Amity Lodge F&AM, Aladdin Shrine and Zavi Shrine Club.

Surviving are his widow, the former Margaret Foster of the home; a son, William F. Murphy of Route 8; a daughter, Mrs. John (Margaret) McConnell, of Minneapolis, Minn.; seven grandchildren; and a brother, John Murphy of Columbus. A brother, Roy, is deceased.

Friends may call 7 to 9 p.m. today and 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Sunday at Bryan Funeral Home.

Lodge of Amity 5 F&AM will hold services at 7 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home.

Source: Zanesville Times Recorder, July 29, 1972.

Small Town News—Adrian Daily Telegram

Morenci—The Misses Marilyn Bryant and Pricilla Downer will leave Monday to being their school year at Siena Heights College in Adrian.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 11, 1943)

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Foster of Toledo called Sunday on Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Rorick.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 26, 1943)

Mrs. Harper Gallup and children are spending a few days with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gallup of Kingsley-st.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, July 29, 1922)

Medina — Miss Helen Guss accompanied by Miss Helen Austin was home from Ypsilanti for the week-end.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 28, 1925)

Mr. and Mrs. Harlow Ingall of Plymouth and their daughter Miss Harriet Ingall of New York City were guests Friday of his parents Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ingall.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, August 10, 1943)

Miss Pearl Jones returned last evening from a pleasant visit with her cousin Dr. E.H. Rorick and family of Fayette, O.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 17, 1910)

Mr. and Mrs. William Jones and daughter, Pearl, were in Rollin Monday, attending the funeral of a brother’s child.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 2, 1905)

Sgt. and Mrs. Jacob Martz arrived Saturday from Portland, Ore., to spend a week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.H. Rorick and family.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 13, 1943)

Mrs. W.C. McConnell is in Morenci, to attend the funeral of her grandfather, Mr. Rorick, who died Saturday. (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 17, 1898)

Mrs. E.E. Spear entertained Tuesday afternoon in honor of Mrs. Maurice Spear. The time was spent socially and Miss Lorena Johnson favored the company with music. Decoration in keeping with the season were [sic] attractive and refreshments were served. The guests were Mrs. G.H. Rorick, Mrs. C.H. Rorick, Mrs. Curtis Rorick, Mrs. Mary Rorick, Mrs. Frank Tayloe, Mrs. Fred oon [sic], Mrs. William Poucher, Mrs. George Pratt, Mrs. Paul Spear, Mrs. Kenneth Spear and Mrs. Richard Rogers. (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 2, 1925)

Dr. Maurice Spear is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E.E. Spear. Dr. Spear and wife recently received their diplomas from the Palmer School of Chiropractors in Davenport, Ia., and will located in Adrian.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, October 7, 1921)

Paul Spear of Claunch, N.M., a former Morenci resident, arrived Thursday evening to visit his brother Kenneth Spear and sister Mrs. Richard Rogers and family and other relatives. He will spend the weekend with his sister Mrs. Ray Lyons and family in Adrian. (Adrian Daily Telegram, October 16, 1943)

Educational News

Sharon Carroll, daugher of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Carroll, has enrolled at the Goldey-Beacom School of Business for the summer session. (Denton Journal, June 21, 1923)

Those who received certificates of promotion from the seventh grade of Hillsboro school are Roberta Rowe, Dorothy Knotts, Hazel Passwaters, Mildred Worth, Pearl Eveland, Herbert Rice, John Eveland, and Lee Seymour. (Denton Journal, June 25, 1921)

Mr. and Mrs. John Eveland, Mrs. J.E. Eveland, and Miss Pearl Eveland attended commencement exercises at Western Maryland College last Monday. Thos. Eveland, a son of Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Eveland, was a graduate. (Denton Journal, June 13, 1936)

Stephen Ray Hanson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Marion R. Hanson of Junction City, has enrolled at Huntington College, Huntington, Ind. Huntington College is founded and supported by the Church of the United Brethren in Christ. (Zanesville Times Recorder, September 22, 1966)

Fairmont Seminary last night sent out its annual quota of cultured womanhood. Sixteen misses representing nine states and the District of Columbia, who have been making preparation for their future careers received their diplomas, certifying they are competent to assume “added rights and new responsibilities” in the parlance of Representative Victor Murdock, of Kansas, who delivered the address of the evening. The graduates are Mary Katharine Brown, of Ohio; Miss Lillian Beatty, of Ohio; Miss Dorothy Marie Borland, of Pennsylvania; Miss Ethel Louise Foster, of this city; Miss Virginia Guitar, of Texas; Miss Hazel Herr, of Pennsylvania; Miss Mabel Elizabeth Halloway, of Kansas; Miss Sarah Frances Hancock, of Texas; Miss Eliza Watts Killian, of South Carolina; Miss Katharine Lauck, of Pennsylvania; Miss Mildred Mann, of Missouri; Miss Ada Rorick McConnell, of Michigan; Miss Grace Marie McClelland, of Pennsylvania; Miss Mabel Clair Payne, of Arkansas; Miss Harriette Richardson, of Texas; and Miss Mattie Lee Yokley, of Tennessee. (Washington Post, May 28, 1910)

Miss Alice Van Sickle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Sickle has been selected as valedictorian of the graduating class of Port Jervis High School, it was announced today by Charles D. Marsh, principal. Maintaining the tradition of a number of years, Miss Van Sickle was chosen by virtue of her holding honor position in the class with the highest average for for years. (Middletown Times Herald, June 22, 1934)

Salem, May 13 — To-day were held the closing exercises of the Oregon school for the blind in the presence of a few invited guests and friends of the pupils. The programmes were very interesting, and consisted of exercises which those who have the full five senses might be proud to be able to render as well. These were not graduating exercises, and the entire class will return next year. The names of the pupils are: Ernest Voos, Portland; Bertie Waller, Salem; Fred V. Cooper, Portland; Misses Lou Lewis, Corvallis; Mollie Read, Mitchell, Wasco county; Blanche Savage, near Salem; Sadie Bristow, near Monmouth; Mary Baker, Silverton; Jess Watkins, Albany; Hattie Carruthers, Albany; Amy Walling, Polk county. The school is under the supervision of D.B. Gray; matron, Mrs. Gray; assistant teacher, Miss N.J. McFallen; music teacher, Miss Helen Holman. (Portland Oregonian, May 14, 1887)

The Hon. John C. Rorick, Native Elmiran, Died in the West

The Republican of Wauseon, O., under the date of December 10, contains an account of the death and a brief sketch of the life of John C. Rorick, who was born near Horseheads. He was a lineal descendant of the early Breese settlers of this valley and until recent years always came to Horseheads to attend the annual reunions of the family and enjoyed an extensive acquaintance in his native county as well as in adopted state. The Republican says:

“Hon. John C. Rorick died at his home on East Elm street, Wednesday afternoon after an illness extending over several months. Mr. Rorick was one of the foremost citizens of the county, a wealth and successful businessman and was identified with several of the banks, business houses and in [sic] institutions.

“He first came to this place in 1865 and purchased the Sherwood House. The next year he removed to Michigan where he remained till 1872 when he again came to Wauseon where he has since resided.

“Mr. Rorick enjoyed the confidences of his fellow man. He served them faithfully and they gave him places of high honor. Twice he was elected to the state board of equalization of property for taxation and in these positions, he won the reputation of being the friend of the average man. His work was marked by ability, fearlessness and honesty.

“Governor Harris appointed Mr. Rorick a member of the state board of Ohio penitentiary managers where he demonstrated his ability as a financier of the first rank. Here he gave the people an efficient, economical administration. In 1911 he was elected a member of the state constitutional convention.

“In all public service Mr. Rorick has proven faithful to every trust reposed in him and he leaves a record and a name untarnished. He kept the faith of he served and made his word as good as his bond.

“John C. Rorick was born near Elmira, N.Y., February 13, 1834 and moved with his parents to Lenawee county, Mich., in 1836. Here he grew to manhood and endured all the hardships of pioneer life. His education he secured mostly by home study. He taught school for a short time and then completed a commercial course, graduating from the Gregory Commercial college, of Detroit.

“For some months Mr. Rorick had been in failing health and in the afternoon of December 8, this active, useful life was ended. He was survived by his wife, a foster daughter, Mrs. W.C. McConnell, of Adrian; a brother, Dr. E.H. Rorick, of Fayette.

“He was commander of the associated G.A.R. organization and a member of Wauseon lodge, Knights of Pythias.”

Source: Elmira Telegram, December 26, 1920.

Hon. John C. Rorick

Hon. John C. Rorick died at his home in Wauseon, Wednesday, Dec. 8, after an illness extending over several months.

Mr. Rorick was one of the foremost citizens of Fulton County. He came from poverty to be one the country’s wealthy and successful business men, being identified with several banks and business institutions. He first came to Wauseon in 1866 and purchased the Sherman House. The next year he returned to Michigan where he remained until 1872, when he again came to Wauseon (Ohio), where he has since resided.

Mr. Rorick enjoyed the confidence of his fellow men. He served them faithfully and they gave him places of honor. He was elected and served for two terms as Senator in the State Legislature. Twice he was elected to the State Board of Equalization of property for taxation and in these positions he won the reputation of being the friend of the average man. His work was marked by ability, fearlessness and honesty.

Gov. Harris appointed Mr. Rorick a member of the State Board of Penitentiary managers, where he demonstrated his ability as a financier of the first rank. Here he gave the people an economical and efficient administration. In 1911 Mr. Rorick was elected a member of the state constitutional convention.

In all public service Mr. Rorick has proven faithful to every trust reposed in him and he leaves a record and a name untarnished. He kept the faith of those whom he has served and made his word as good as his bond.

John C. Rorick was born near Elmira, N.Y. Feb. 13, 1834 and moved with his parents to Lenawee Co., Mich. in 1836. There he grew to manhood and endured all the hardships of pioneer life. His education was secured largely by home study. He taught school for a short time and then completed a commercial course, graduating from the Gregory Commercial College of Detroit.

For some months, Mr. Rorick has been in failing health and on the afternoon of Dec. 8, this active, useful life was ended, leaving his aged companion, a foster daughter, Mrs. W.C. McConnell of Adrian, a brother, Dr. Estell H. Rorick of Fayette, a sister, Mrs. L.H. Converse of Morenci, and hosts of friends to cherish his memory.

Mr. Rorick was commander of the Associate G.A.R. organization and a member of Wauseon Lodge Knights of Pythias.

Source:  Lundahl, Helen Rorick.  (n.d.) The Rorick Family in America.  (NB: This manuscript is held in the Toledo-Lucas County Library and contains a number of transcriptions of undated newspaper clippings.)

A Sad Death

Mrs. F.E. Bryant Taken From Loved Ones

One of the saddest deaths we have been called upon to record was that of Mrs. Frank E. Bryant of Seneca, who was called from her beloved family last Monday afternoon. Expressions of regret at the death of beautiful and useful life in the prime of womanhood were heard everywhere in the community. She had been ill only two weeks and her condition was not considered serious until a few days before her demise. Sad indeed was the taking away to the loving husband and children who still need the care and devotion of a mother’s heart. To her father, Jacob Rorick, and her grandmother, Mrs. Caroline Sayres, who is still young at the advanced age of 91, the loss of her companionship is a sad affliction. In fact, all her many friends and relatives mourn her early departure.

Kate B. Rorick, daughter of Jacob and Mary Rorick, was born in Canandaigua, Mich., January 9, 1872, and at the time of her death, October 24, 1910, was aged 38 years, 9 months, and 15 days. She was united in marriage to Frank E. Bryant September 7, 1893, and to this union were born five children, two sons, John and Jacob, dying in early childhood. The three surviving children are Mary L., Florence S., and Gerald, ranging in age from 12 to 16 years. During her life, she was a devoted daughter, wife and mother.

Besides the mourning husband, children, father and grandmother, the latter two in later years making their home with her, she leaves one brother, William R. Rorick of Buffalo, and two sisters: Mrs. Mel McCloe of Detroit and Mrs. Carl Guss of Medina, besides a host of friends and relatives.

The funeral, which was one of the largest in attendance the county has seen in recent years, was held on Wednesday afternoon, Rev. Henry Coates officiating. Appropriate songs were rendered by Miss Susan Furman and Mrs. Ed. Moore, with Miss Flossie Allen accompanist. The bearers were composed of relatives and near friends, who tenderly carried the remains to their last resting place. The floral tributes were beautiful and numerous and attested the loving esteem in which the departed was held.

Among those attending from a distance were Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Rorick of Buffalo, N.Y.; Dr. and Mrs. E.H. Rorick and daughter, Mrs. Fred Sullivan, and Mrs. G.H. Crane of Fayette; Mr. and Mrs. Mel McCloe and daughter, Mertie, and Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Sloan of Detroit; Mrs. Hervey Spencer and Mrs. Howland of Birmingham, Mich.; Mr. and Mrs. W.C. McConnell, Mr. and Mrs. Clark E. Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs. Chas Ream and Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Vedder of Adrian; Mr. and Mrs. John Rorick and Mr. and Mrs. Will Gorsuch of Wauseon.

Source: Undated newspaper clipping in the possession of Mike Meister.

Cleantha M’Connell Taken By Death

Demise Came Unexpected After Illness of Influenza, Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.C. McConnell

The unexpected death of Miss Cleantha McConnell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.C. McConnell, occurred last night at 9:30 o’clock at the family residence on South Main street, death being due to influenza.  Miss McConnell was born in 1893 and is survived by her parents and one sister, Mrs. Wallace D. McLean of Bronxille, N.Y.

She attended the Adrian schools and after completing her work here was a student in the Fairmount school in Washington, D.C., where she graduated.  From there she went to Miss Day’s school in New York city, also graduating there, and since then had spent much time in traveling.

Miss McConnell was of a very lovable and charitable nature and greatly beloved by her many friends and acquaintances not only in Adrian but in Lansing, where she had spent much time in visiting.  She was always ready to help those where needy and sick, only she and the recipient knowing of her many deeds of kindness.

One of the sad features of her death was her approaching marriage to Wyllis Osborn Dodge of Lansing, who has been here during her illness and will remain until the latter part of the week.

The funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon, the time not yet having been set.

Source:  Adrian Daily Telegram, April 8, 1919.