Short News Items from 1902

The crack shots of the vicinity contested for honors and an oyster supper in a shooting match, blue rock pigeons being used as targets. Frank Boehringer and Lorin Walling were the captains. Loyd Hunt carried off the honors with a score of five birds out of six shots. The winning side and their partners were feasted to oysters in Lincoln warehouse. A pleasant evening was spent in games, but the oysters gave out and Mr. Boehringer and Mr. Duncan have not been heard from since. (Polk County Itemizer, January 17, 1902)

D.A. Baxter, principal of the public schools at Meridian, is in the city to attend the county teachers’ meeting. (Idaho Statesman, February 9, 1902)

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Lawrenceville Badly Scorched

Woman’s Target Practice Accountable for $30,000 Blaze Last Night—Wing Bostwick, Eaton & Son and Spring are the Losers.

At 11:50 last night fire broke out in Spring’s bakery and millinery store in Lawrenceville, caused by a woman throwing a lighted lamp at her husband’s head, and spread rapidly to the brick store of Wing & Bostwick on the corner, and the adjacent flour and feed store of Easton & Son, all of which were consumed with most of the contents, including Bell Telephone exchange.

The loss approximates $30,000. Had there been an adequate water supply, the heavy loss would probably have been in part averted. The buildings were well insured, and Wing & Bostwick had $21,300 on stock and fixtures in the Hoard agency, this boro.

Source: Mansfield Advertiser, December 24, 1902.

Big Fire Last Night

Lawrenceville Badly Scorched and Loss Heavy.

Wing & Bostwick’s Corner and Adjoining Buildings Burned.

There was a big fire at Lawrenceville early this morning. It is impossible as we possible as we go to press to get particulars by telephone as wires are burned.

The fire started in the general store of Wing & Bostwick. This building, which is of brick and stone, was destroyed, also the old Darling block and the general store of N. Eaton & Son.

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Downing—Casterlin.

A YOUNG MINISTER WEDS AN ORANGE YOUNG LADY.

The home of Joseph Casterlin at Orange, Pa., was the scene on Wednesday, Dec. 10, of the wedding of the youngest daughter, Lizzie, and Herman C. Downing of Lehman. At 12 noon the bridal party took its place in the parlor and Rev. H.M. Pease of Centremoreland, the bride’s pastor, spoke the word which made the happy couple one. After congratulations the company had a dinner long to be remembered. After a season of pleasant social enjoyment the bridal couple started for Lehman for a short visit at Mr. Downing’s home.  On the following day they started for their new home at St. Mary’s, W.Va., where Mr. Downing is pastor-elect of the First Baptist Church. Both Mr. and Mrs. Downing are well known and much respected in that section.  He is a graduate of Keystone Academy and of Crozer Theological Seminary and took part in the college course at Bucknell University. He served as pastor of the Baptist churches at Centremoreland and Lehman for quite a length of time and made many friends.  He goes to his new field of labor with many well wishes from Centremoreland.  His wife is well adapted to be a helper to him in his chosen life work.  She has a well trained mind and a pure, consecrated life, and is an accomplished musician.  She will be missed in the church and Sunday school and W.C.T.U. work at her old home.

On account of the recent death of I.O. Drake of Dorranceton, brother-in-law of the bride, the guests were only the near relatives and neighbors.  The following is a partial list of those in attendance: Joseph Casterlin, Mary E. Casterlin, Susie C. Drake, Lizzie Drake, Etna L. Downing, J.M. Casterlin, Julia A. Casterlin, Asa Casterlin, Mary Casterlin, Sadie D. Rosenkrans, J.D. Frantz, Edith Frantz, Walter Frantz, E.B. Longwell, Mrs. Malvina Longwell, Fred Longwell, Rev. H.M. Pease, Mrs. H.M. Pease and George Floyd and Russell Pease.  Many beautiful presents will accompany the young people to their West Virginia home, tokens of love and esteem in which they are held here.  May peace, plenty and power abide in the Baptist parsonage at St. Mary’s.

Source:  Wilkes-Barre Semi-Weekly Record, December 16, 1902.

Young Minister Weds

Lizzie, youngest daughter of Joseph Casterlin, of Orange, was united in marriage Wednesday evening to Rev. Herman C. Downing.  The ceremony was performed at the bride’s home by Rev. H.M. Pease of Centermoreland.  The following day they started for their new home at St. Mary’s, W. Va., where Mr. Downing is pastor-elect of the First Baptist church. The following is a partial list of those in attendance: Joseph Casterlin, Mary E. Casterlin, Susie C. Drake, Lizzie Drake, Etna L. Downings, J.M. Casterlin, Julia A. Casterlin, Asa Casterlin, Mary Casterlin, Sadie D. Rosenkrans, J.D. Frantz, Edith Frantz, Walter Frantz, E.B. Longwell, H.M. Pease, Mrs. H.M. Pease and George Floyd and Russell Pease.  Many beautiful presents will accompany the young people to their West Viriginia home, tokens of love and esteem in which they are held here. May peace, plenty and power abide in the Baptist parsonage at St. Mary’s.

Source:  Wilkes-Barre Times, December 13, 1902.

On A Long Journey

Nephew of E.S.B. Sutton with His Bride Left For South Africa Today

Mr. and Mrs. Linton B. Sutton, of Randfontein, South Africa, are the guests of Mr. Sutton’s uncle, E.S.B. Sutton. They are leaving this afternoon on the first stage of their journey to their distant home in the Transvaal.  Mr. Sutton is a noted mining engineer and is developing a gold property in Randfontein for a syndicate of English and American capitalists, among whom are Mark Hanna and Gen. Alger.  Mrs. Sutton was Miss Edith Hanby, of Riddlesburg, Pa., and they were united in marriage just a month ago.  Mr. Sutton returned to the United States to claim his bride and they are now about to go back to Africa to make their home for an indefinite number of years.

Source:  Sault Ste. Marie Evening News, November 7, 1902.

Mrs. H.F. Drumm

Ora Drumm, daughter of Mrs. Bertha Fink of near Mt. Sterling and wife of Harvey Drumm, son of A.P. Drumm, carrier on route 5, died Thursday evening at 7 o’clock at her home in Hopewell township. Mrs. Drumm, besides a husband, leaves a family of four children. She had been a silent sufferer for a year past. Deceased was a member from childhood of Mount Olive U.B. Church and was a consistent and lovable christian [sic] lady. The funeral arrangements have not yet been made but will be announced in Saturday’s Times Recorder.

Source: Zanesville Times Recorder, August 29, 1902.

Mountain Lions.

REDDING.—Mrs. A. F. Dobrowsky, the young and pretty wife of a local jeweler, killed two mountain lions on Sunday at Bear mountain, distant twenty miles. The man an4 his wife are ardent sportsmen. They go every Sunday into the woods, but last Sunday she killed her first mountain lion.

She was alone on the mountain side when she was attracted by the baying of her hound. She found he had a large panther up a tree.- As she prepared to shoot at it she saw a second lion looking hungrily at her through the thick foliage. Just then her husband came up, attracted by the noise of the dog. At the count of three the two rifles rang out and the two tawny brutes fell to the earth, mortally wounded.

As they rolled in their death struggles Mrs. Dobrowsky saw a third mountain lion higher up in the tree than its fellows had been. She killed it with one ball. The smallest lion measured five feet.

Source: Santa Cruz Morning Sentinel, July 23, 1902.

Fearing Insanity, Lawyer Commits Suicide In Hotel

Joseph H. Sutton Goes to Manhattan and Shoots Himself Dead.

SENT LETTERS TO FRIENDS, WHO ARRIVED TOO LATE

Clergyman’s Son Wrote That He Had Been “Going Crazy for Some Time.”

Joseph H. Sutton, unmarried, thirty-two years old, employed as managing clerk for the law firm of Hollis, Wagner & Burghardt, at No. 120 Broadway, committed suicide in a room at the Manhattan hotel during last night by shooting himself in the head. He was found dead by Mr. Edwin R. Patch, the manager of the hotel, and a porter to-day.

Several persons called to see Mr. Sutton to-day, and it was on account of their anxiety about the man that Mr. Patch and the porter broke into the room he had been assigned to and found the body. Mr. Sutton went to the hotel yesterday afternoon and registered. He had patronized the hotel before and was known slightly to the clerks in the office.

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