Isaac D. Shipman

Isaac D. Shipman, Burdett. Saturday, Aug. 2, 1947. Survived by wife, Ada Belle Shipman; daughter, Mrs. Nelson Brown; grandson, Donald Brown, all of Burdett. Funeral today, 1:30 p.m., at the Arnold Funeral Home, Burdett. The Rev. Charles Townsend. Burial at Second Milo.

Source: Elmira Star-Gazette, August 4, 1947.

Engagement Announced

The home of Mrs. Floyd Brown was the scene of a delightful gathering Sunday afternoon, August 30th when Mrs. Brown entertained a few of her daughter’s intimate friends at a Tea.

At the time Mrs. Brown announced the engagement of her daughter, Virginia F. Brown, to Frederick C. Drake, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carlyle Drake, of 463 W. Gray St., Elmira, N.Y.

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Old Timer Is Recent Guest At Irvington

Irvington, Oct. 17.—Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Brown, Los Angeles, who, en route to Minneapolis, recently visited the H.E. Rists at Algona, also drove through this vicinity.  Clarence is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Zelora Brown, who lived here many years ago.  The Browns lived in a house which then stood, with many other buildings, east of the tracks in a field farmed by Richard Leigh. Zelora, now a resident of Minneapolis, also ran a store here.  Mrs. Zelora Brown is a sister of the late Dr. J.R. Armstrong, who is so well remembered and often recalled by the older residents here.  Doctor Armstrong, besides being the sole physician here at that time, also taught school and was superintendent of the Sunday school.  The late J.B. Robison was one of his pupils. Doctor Armstrong built and lived in the house now occupied by the Richard Leighs.  Later they moved to the property now owned by the U.B. Frankl’s, where the doctor died.  Mr. Brown said things did not look familiar; so many buildings have either been moved, torn down, or remodeled.

Source:  Kossuth County Advance, October 19, 1933.

Short News Items from 1931

Rev. Burl Brown and family are attending annual conference at Sabina, this week. (Marysville Journal-Tribune, August 20, 1931)

John Shauger of Onsted visited Thomas Isaacson and family Sunday.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 15, 1931)

Mildred Armstrong has been ill the past week at the home of her grandmother, Mrs. Sharp.  (Algona Upper Des Moines, October 21, 1931)

Short News Items from 1930

Warren and Howard Sickler, of Endicott, N.Y., spent the week end with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mason Sickler. (Tunkhannock New Age, February 6, 1930)

Augustus Printz is reportedly seriously ill at his home here. (Zanesville Times Record, February 13, 1930)

Mr. Claude Dymond has purchased a fine team of horses of Arthur Shook of Center Moreland. (Tunkhannock New Age, March 13, 1930)

Mrs. Lillie Sickler spent a couple of days last week with her daughter, Mrs. Claude Dymond. (Tunkhannock New Age, March 13, 1930)

Mrs. Rev. Burl Brown and son, Paul, spent last week in Springfield with Mr. Brown’s parents and sister. (Marysville Journal-Tribune, March 18, 1930)

Charles Beardslee, 91, Pioneer Teacher, Is Dead

Was in Oakland County Schools Many Years Prior to Taking Up Farming.

Charles Beardslee, 91 years old, died Thursday evening at his residence, 175 Marston avenue. He was one of the first school teachers in Michigan.

For many years he taught in Oakland county. Prior to that time he was a teacher in New Jersey state. In middle life he gave up teaching and became a farmer.

Born in Sussex county, N.J., Mr. Beardslee came here with his parents when he was 7 years old. The family located in Oakland county.

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Short News Items from 1899

Mrs. Z.C. Andruss returned Wednesday from her visit with her daughters, Mrs. Dilts, at Randolph, Iowa. (Algona Courier, January 6, 1899)

Mrs. Z.E. Brown of Minneapolis has been visiting her brother and sister, Dr. Armstrong and Mrs. Z.C. Andruss of Irvington. (Algona Republican, January 11, 1899)

Now that Steve George has joined the army of benedicts Wat Rorick has formed a partnership with Grant Cooksey and will be able to scoop any and all fishing next spring that is if he can teach Grant how to fish as fisherman should. (The Caldwell Advance, January 19, 1899)

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Short News Items from 1898

TO KLONDIKE—A rumor comes over from Oxford Mills that a party of six will soon start from there for the gold fields of Alaska. The party will consist of V.O. Hammond, well known here; D.D. Rorick, an attorney at Oxford Junction; David and John Rorick, who come from near St. Louis, and Dr. Strevell and son. They are making preparations now to start. (Anamosa Eureka, January 13, 1898)

LuVerne News: John Dilts, son-in-law of Z.C. Andruss, has sold his home in Randolph and he and his family are coming up to spend a year at least ‘neath the parental roof. (Algona Upper Des Moines, February 16, 1898)

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Matrimonial News from 1893

Clifford Ball, late of Ballston, but now a railway postal clerk, was recently married to Miss Jessie McGrew at Monmouth. (Oregon Statesman, December 22, 1893)

Walter R. Brown, a well known young business man of this city, was married Wednesday to Miss Jessie B. Tyler, at the home of the bride’s parents in Burlington, Vt. After a month spent in visiting Eastern cities, Mr. and Mrs. Brown will be at home for the summer at the Lake Minnetonka residence, “The Trossachs.” (Minneapolis Star Tribune, April 23, 1893)

Short News Items from 1891

Mrs. Z.E. Brown and sons, Walter and Clarence, of Minneapolis, have been visiting the past ten days with Mrs. Z.C. Andruss. They return to their home in a few days. Mrs. Brown is a sister of Mrs. Andruss. (Algona Republican, August 5, 1891)

Asa Casterline’s residence, in Northmoreland was totally destroyed by fire Wednesday morning. Origin unknown. Loss $1000; insurance $400. Nearly all the household goods were saved. (Wilkes-Barre News, August 7, 1891)

Another accident occurred upon Tuesday of which no information was received until yesterday. Enos Walling was kicked by his bay mare, the shoe cutting his right arm to the bone, which it fractured. (Idaho Semi-Weekly World, August 18, 1891)