Parents Of Bay Victim Formerly Lived Here

F. [sic] Toner, who was killed at Toledo, Or., a few days ago, was a son of Mr. and Mrs. William Toner. Mr. Toner lived in Oregon City several years ago, and is well known here. The young man was in company with three other young men, all of whom lost their lives in the bay when the boat capsized. Another son of Mr. and Mrs. Toner died of typhoid fever.

Source: Oregon City Enterprise, October 23, 1912.

Prominent Man Died On Sunday

Cosper Rorick, Banker Of Morenci Village

Well Known for Over Half a Century to the People of Lenawee and Fulton Counties

MORENCI, Mich., April 25.—About 8 o’clock last evening the sad and, to the general public, surprising news, was received here announcing the death of Cosper Rorick, president of the First National Bank of this village, at the home of his sister Mrs. Dr. Rorick Bennett in Detroit. Mr. Rorick had been in a state of reduced strength for some time from diabetes, although he was about as usual and at the bank daily. He had also suffered greatly from hemorrhoids and had hitherto been relieved of that difficulty by operations. Believing he could again find relief it was for this purpose that with his wife he had gone to Detroit, and underwent an operation Thursday. He failed to rally and when it appeared that he could not live his children were summoned to his bedside; also his sister Mrs. S.K. Porter of this place, all of whom were with him when he passed away.

Continue reading “Prominent Man Died On Sunday”

Clara MacLeod Will Wed Yale Man In Fall

Localites will be interested to learn of a betrothal heralded last Friday at the Colony Club in Manhattan when Miss Clara Marsh MacLeod and Horton C. Rorick told a group of friends that they would wed, probably some time in the fall.

The young lady hails from Missoula, Mont., where her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter H. MacLeod live, but she stems from a well-known San Francisco family. She also made a host of friends of her own while attending the Katherine Branson school in Ross a few years ago.

Continue reading “Clara MacLeod Will Wed Yale Man In Fall”

Untitled (David G. Rorick)

The sad intelligence of the death of D.G. Rorick was received from San Bernardino yesterday. Mr. Rorick who was conductor of the San Jacinto train, left his post of duty just a week ago yesterday, and in company with his wife went to Arrowhead to recuperate, being in ill-health. He seemed threated with pneumonia, but word has been received that he died at about 5 o’clock yesterday morning of neuralgia of the brain. Mr. Rorick was of a genial disposition and kindly heart, and it seems almost incredible that one who appeared so strong and well but a week ago should be thus suddenly stricken down. Mr. Rorick has been connected with the San Jacinto run for a great many years. He leaves a wife to mourn his untimely taking off. The funeral will take place in San Bernardino.

Source: Riverside Press and Horticulturist, March 31, 1900.

Mr. Z.E. Brown Reported Dying

The above person is a relative of Dr. and J.D. Witter, of this city. Two years ago he was in this city the guest of Dr. Witter and received great help from his treatment. The following about his condition is taken from the St. Paul Pioneer Press:—A telegram has been received from Los Angeles, Cal., stating that Zelora E. Brown, the well known real estate agent and former partner of H.O. Hamlin, was in a dying condition. In response to this sad message Mrs. Brown and her son left yesterday for California. During the major portion of last summer Mr. Brown had suffered much from bilious disorders, and left for the Pacific coast early in the winter in the hope that a change of climate would prove beneficial. It appears, however, that the disease continued to make rapid progress, and all remedial objects proved unavailing. Prior to engaging in the real estate business Mr. Brown had been a commercial traveler, and was very generally and favorably known throughout the state. Personally he was esteemed by all with whom he came in contact, and the unfavorable report in regard to his condition will create deep regret in his extended circle of acquaintances.

Later—Mr. Brown died in Los Angeles, Wednesday last.

Source: Wood County Reporter, February 2, 1888.

A Child’s Death

Harry Van Sickle, aged three months, child of John E. Van Sickle of this village, died Tuesday night at about 10 o’clock of cholera infantum. The funeral will take place Thursday afternoon at 2:30 from the house.

Source: Port Jervis Evening Gazette, August 10, 1881.

P.F. Cawley, Aged 83, Fayette Merchant Dead

FAYETTE, O., Oct. 23.—P.F. Cawley, 83 years old, died this morning at home after an illness of several months. He had been a resident of this place for many years and was senior member of the dry goods firm of Fish & Cawley. He leaves one son Herbert and a daughter Helen. The funeral service will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the home on North Main street.

Source: Adrian Daily Telegram, October 23, 1919.

Killed By His Horse

Jesse D. Walling, an old and respected citizen of Polk county, was killed by his horse running over him, on the 9th inst. Following is Statesman’s account:

It appears that we out on the roads, as Supervisor, working a party of men. About three o’clock yesterday afternoon, his saddle horse, a young animal, got loose and started to run along the road. Mr. Walling rain in front to stop him, but the animal dashed straight on, striking him in the face and throwing him back against a log with great force. The back of his struck a knot which penetrated the skull and he never spoke again. He was picked up, breathing, but insensible, and carried home while a physician was hastily summoned, but before Dr. Grubbs, who had been called, reached the place the old gentleman was dead. He was an old settler of Oregon, an enterprising citizen, good neighbor, kind friend, and leaves a large family to mourn his sudden loss. They have the sympathizes of a host of friends, for all remember “Uncle Jesse” as a man of kind words and noble deed. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and no doubt the funeral will be under the auspices of the order.

Source: Albany Register, May 14, 1870.

Untitled (Jesse D. Walling)

Jesse Walling, of Polk county, was last Tuesday killed under the following distressing circumstances, as detailed by the Statesman:

It appears that we out on the roads, as Supervisor, working a party of men. About three o’clock yesterday afternoon, his saddle horse, a young animal, got loose and started to run along the road. Mr. Walling rain in front to stop him, but the animal dashed straight on, striking him in the face and throwing him back against a log with great force. The back of his struck a knot which penetrated the skull and he never spoke again. He was picked up, breathing, but insensible, and carried home while a physician was hastily summoned, but before Dr. Grubbs, who had been called, reached the place the old gentleman was dead. He was an old settler of Oregon, an enterprising citizen, good neighbor, kind friend, and leaves a large family to mourn his sudden loss. They have the sympathizes of a host of friends, for all remember “Uncle Jesse” as a man of kind words and noble deed. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and no doubt the funeral will be under the auspices of the order.

Source: Albany State Rights Democrat, May 13, 1870.