Clark L. Rorick Arrested

Clark L. Rorick, 34 years old, 1044 Winona avenue, was sentenced to 90 days in the Bridewell yesterday by Judge Joseph Graber on a charge of driving while intoxicated. He was allowed ten days to appeal, and was released on cash bond. He was arrested when his automobile crashed into a traffic signal post at Diversey parkway and Halsted street early yesterday.

His woman companion, who gave her names as Mary Cruise, 29 years old, 3431 Elaine place, was fined $25. When arrested the woman told the police that she was private secretary to Secretary of State William J. Stratton and threatened to “get their jobs.”

Rorick admitted to reporters that his companion had never worked for the secretary of state. Miss Rose M. Cruise, of 3423 Elaine place, who was employed in the office of the secretary of state while Louis L. Emmerson held the position, said she did not know the woman. Miss Rose Cruise said she would ask Lincoln park police to make an investigation to clear her name.

Source:  Chicago Daily Tribune, November 17, 1932.

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Is Held For Trial

DR. C.T. BENNETT MUST ANSWER FOR MANSLAUGHTER

ORDER MADE BY JUDGE DOYLE

BAIL BOND FIXED AT $10,000 WITH TWO SURETIES

EVIDENCE NOT SUFFICIENT TO SUSTAIN CHARGE OF MURDER – ONE BONDSMAN MUST BE A RESIDENT OF KENT COUNTY

The police court end of the case against Dr. Charles T. Bennett was concluded yesterday. He was held for trial in the superior court on the charge of manslaughter. The judge did not consider the evidence was sufficient to hold Dr. Bennett on the charge of murder. He fixed the bond at $10,000, with three sureties, one of which he required to be a resident of this county. Attorneys McKnight and Clark argued for a bond in nominal sum, but Judge Doyle was firm and would not make a reduction from $10,000. The afternoon was spent by Dr. Bennett and his brother-in-law, Casper Rorick of Morenci, in trying to complete arrangements by which Dr. Bennett may be released. In order to get a bondsman, a resident of Kent county, Dr. Bennett and his friends will have to put up $10,000 collateral security.

In police court yesterday the testimony of George B. Richards, brother of Alta B. Richards, who died under chloroform administered by the doctor, was read and signed. There was nothing more to be done in police court except the making of the order by the judge.

Source: Grand Rapids Herald, July 18, 1899

 

She Stands By Him

DR. RORICK BENNETT DEFENDS HER HUSBAND

SHE CALLS IT A PERSECUTION

Wife of the Detroit Doctor Charged With Being Responsible for the Death of Alita Richards is Interviewed – Does Not Fear the Outcome of the Trial Here.

Dr. Rorick Bennett, wife of Dr. C.T. Bennett, charged with the murder of Miss Alita Richards in this city, has been interviewed by a Detroit evening paper, which contains the following account of the interview:

” ‘It is a persecution, due to professional jealousy on the part of Grand Rapids hospitals,’ ” said the wife of Dr. Charles Tanner Bennett, referring to the prosecution of her husband, charged with causing the death of Miss Alita Richards by malpractice.”

” ‘They saw their opportunity to cause him trouble for taking patients and money away from him, and seized upon it.’

“Mrs. Bennett did not seem at all alarmed about the outcome of the case against her husband. She sat composed in a deeply cushioned chair, her handsome face, black hair and flashing dark eyes standing out in bold relief against the mass of carnations that overflowed the jardinière behind her. The atmosphere of the spacious parlors, three of them, opening one into the other, was sweet with the perfume of flowers. The carpets were soft to luxuriousness, the hangings rich and heavy, the furniture costly and well selected. The whole was a blending of effects in excellent taste and harmony.

“Mrs. Bennett’s composure may have been but the natural comportment of a well-bred woman, or it may have been that she is a physician herself, and trained to composure. She is a member of the Eclectic School of Medicine, and her professional names is Dr. Rorick Bennett. Anyhow, though she had not heard of the finding that her husband caused the death of Alita Richards “by administering to her chloroform wrongfully, negligently and unprofessionally,” she exhibited no surprise nor emotion upon learning of the fact; nor any gratification upon receiving the information that her husband hoped to be released from prison upon bail on Thursday.

Should Be an Expert

” ‘Dr. Bennett,’ she said, ‘has been administering chloroform during 28 years of country practice, with no ill results or results. He graduated in ’71 or ’72 from the school of regular physicians at the University of Michigan, and for 10 years has been living in Detroit, constantly attending to a large practice. The testimony of the Grand Rapids physicians that he administered the chloroform while the young lady patient was improperly confined in corsets or stays is contradicted by the testimony of the nurse present. Anyway, he may have told the young lady to loosen her stays before the operation, and she may have failed to notify him that she had not. An examination of the young girl after death showed a pleural adhesion of the lungs to the chest, but no physician could be aware of that unless the adhesion were so great as to include parts of the lungs. The entire case against him is very thin. Besides, he had given the patient chloroform before without ill effects. The cause of her death was undoubtedly due to some temporary physical condition at the time the chloroform was administered, of which the physician could not be aware.’

“Mrs. Bennett’s tone and attitude were always professional. It was so oddly analytical that it gave rise to an idle wonder if she would so professionally discuss and analyse with her husband during the last moments of his life any disease that laid him on his deathbed.

She Was Bored

“Mrs. Bennett seemed politely bored at this point, and it was only with reluctance that she could be induced to give a few facts regarding her husband his practice. He was born in New York state, just where she did not know. He was 57 years of age, but when he married, she said, was immaterial. He went from Adrian college to the state university at Ann Arbor, and upon graduation went to Morenci, where he practiced many years. His professional career has been that of an advertising physician, who traveled from town to town throughout the state, advertising his arrival in local papers and receiving patients at his rooms in the hotel. He published pamphlets of his method of treatment and was always accompanied by more or less Dr. Bennett literature. [sic] Of late years he has largely given up his advertising methods and made Detroit his headquarters, spending three days every week here and the remainder of the week on the road, stopping at such cities as Adrian, Coldwater, Jackson, Bay City, Grand Rapids, Lansing, etc.

” ‘Treating his regular patients,’ added Mrs. Bennett. Then coldly: ‘If you make any inquiries regarding him from any of his patients I think you will be satisfied as to his standing as a physician.’

“Mrs. Bennett does not fear the outcome of the trial of her husband. Whatever the result, whether he proved a competent or incompetent physician, whether he is criminally responsible for the death of Alita Richards, or treated her in an unprofessional way, one thing is certain, the doctor has a most handsome and elegantly appointed home upon one of the most fashionable of Detroit’s streets, and has made, apparently, a most astounding financial success in medical practice, even if he is one of the profession’s abhorred ‘advertising and traveling doctors.’ ”

Source: Grand Rapids Herald, June 29, 1899.

Crime & Punishment

Dr. Rorick Bennett says the prosecution of her husband, Dr. C.T. Bennett, of this city, arising out of the death of Miss Alta Richard under his treatment at a Grand Rapids hotel is due to professional jealous of physicians of that city. She said her husband had administered chloroform to this patient previously without any ill results, and that the young woman’s death must have been caused by some temporary physical condition of which the physician could not be aware. (Detroit Free Press, June 29, 1899)

Frederick Johnson, indicted on the charge of stealing a horse valued at $50 from Albert Rorick of Emmons County, pleaded not guilty and, at his request, M.T. O’Conner was appointed to defend him. (Bismarck Tribune, November 21, 1884)

TIRE, WHEEL STOLEN: Ray E. Yocom, of Montgomery avenue, reported to police last night that thieves had forced the rear compartment door of his car and stolen a tire and wheel assembly, valued at $36. The theft occurred while the auto was parked on Market street Saturday evening, Yocom said. (Zanesville Times Recorder, March 3, 1942)

Harley Yocum, Clarence Dickerson and Jesse Guest pleaded not guilty to possessing intoxicating liquors and their cases were continued. They were arrested Saturday evening following raids at their homes when home brew beer was found by officers. (Zanesville Times Recorder, June 23, 1925)

Harley Yocum of Falls township was fined $100 and costs when he pleaded guilty to a charge of possessing intoxicating liquor in municipal court Thursday afternoon. He paid his fine and was released. (Zanesville Times Recorder, June 26, 1925)

 

The Police Blotter

A young man named Seymour Glandon was arrested in Ashland Tuesday by Deputy Sheriff Logan on a warrant from Polk county, where he is wanted to answer on a charge of seduction. (The Oregonian, October 7, 1886)

Sussex Courts open. Continue but four days. One trial of note was Jacob Kimble vs. James R. Inglis, for seduction of daughter. Verdict $300. (Newspaper Clippings from the Sussex Register. 1887-1899. Newton, N.J.: The Register. Originally published August 15, 1837)

Miller, S.D., March 19. — The sheriff has brought in Willard Davis, charged with store breaking. Dave and John Rorick have also been arrested. It develops that an organized band has been operating here for some time. (Bismarck Tribune, March 19, 1894, and  Aberdeen Daily News, March 19, 1894)

BURGLARIES IN DECKERTOWN: Burglars were at work in Deckertown, Wednesday night. They entered the residence of Mayor Margarum and ransacked the lower part of the house, but only got $6, which they took from Miss Mary Margarum’s purse. (Middletown Daily Argus, March 23, 1894)

Levi Lateer was arrested, to-day, on the charge of keeping a disorderly house in the North End. He pleased not guilty and demanded a jury trial, and gave bail for his appearance from trial on Friday. (Middletown Daily Argus, August 31, 1896)

The case against of the people vs. Levi Lateer, charged with keeping a disorderly house at the North End, was called before the Recorder this morning. The defendant was discharged, the complainant failing to put in an appearance. (Middletown Daily Argus, September 22, 1896)

Mrs. Thelma B. Brown, 41, of 808 Luck avenue was fined $10 and court costs Thursday in Municipal Court after she pleaded guilty to a charge of reckless operation. Mrs. Brown was charged Wednesday after she parked her auto and opened her car door into the path of a car driven by Charles F. Hutchinson, 35, of 739 Homewood. The accident occurred on Homewood avenue. (Zanesville Times Recorder, February 28, 1964)

Clark L. Rorick Sentenced

Clark L. Rorick, 34 years old, 1044 Winona avenue, was sentenced to 90 days in the Bridewell yesterday by Judge Joseph Graber on a charge of driving while intoxicated.  He was allowed ten days to appeal, and was released on cash bond.  He was arrested when his automobile crashed into a traffic signal post at Diversey parkway and Halsted street early yesterday.

His woman companion, who gave her name as Mary Cruise, 29 years old, 3431 Elaine place, was fined $25.  When arrested the woman told the police that she was private secretary to Secretary of State William J. Stratton and threatened to “get their jobs.”

Rorick admitted to reporters that his companion had never worked for the secretary of state.  Miss Rose M. Cruise, of 3423 Elaine place, who was employed in the office of the secretary of state while Louis L. Emmerson held the position, said she did not know the woman.  Miss Rose Cruise said she would ask Lincoln park police to make an investigation to clear her name.

Source:  Chicago Daily Tribune, November 17, 1932.

Short Crime Reports

A young man named Seymour Glandon was arrested in Ashland Tuesday by Deputy Sheriff Logan on a warrant from Polk county, where he is wanted to answer on a charge of seduction.  (The Oregonian, October 7, 1886)

Oregon City, Nov. 2 (Special)  — Cecil Hallinan of Portland, indicted some time ago for operating a slot machine in Clackamas county, will be tried on November 8, it was announced today by District Attorney Fred Miller.  (The Oregonian, November 3, 1935)

Sussex Courts open.  Continue but four days.  One trial of note was Jacob Kimble vs. James R. Inglis, for seduction of daughter.  Verdict $300.  (Newspaper Clippings from the Sussex Register.  1887-1899.  Newton, N.J.: The Register.  Originally published August 15, 1837)

Levi Lateer was arrested, to-day, on the charge of keeping a disorderly house in the North End.  He pleaded not guilty and demanded a jury trial, and gave bail for his appearance from trial on Friday.  (Middletown Daily Argus, August 31, 1896)

The case against of the people vs. Levi Lateer, charged with keeping a disorderly house at the North End, was called before the Recorder this morning.  The defendant was discharged, the complainant failing to put in an appearance.  (Middletown Daily Argus, September 22, 1896)

BURGLARIES IN DECKERTOWN: Burglars were at work in Deckertown, Wednesday night. They entered the residence of Mayor Margarum and ransacked the lower part of the house, but only got $6, which they took from Miss Mary Margarum’s purse. (Middletown Daily Argus, March 23, 1894)

Miller, S.D., March 19. – The sheriff has brought in Willard Davis, charged with store breaking.  Dave and John Rorick have also been arrested.  It develops that an organized band has been operating here for some time.  (Aberdeen Daily News, April 19, 1894)

Realous Walling

ORDERED TO PENITENTIARY — Realovis [sic] Walling, a young man of 20, who completely upset the town of Irrigon, in Morrow County, was ordered committed to the penitentiary for one year by Judge Frazer yesterday.  Walling was sentenced in November last on a larceny charge, and was paroled during good behavior.  He was given work at Irrigon, and he associated with a woman of bad repute, broke up the social dances, lodges and caused trouble generally. Walling was once a vaudeville performer, and considers himself a ladies’ man.  When he was paroled he was instructed by Judge Frazer to live as near as possible a perfect life until the terms of his parole expired.  Judge Frazer yesterday investigated the case, and decided that the charges against Walling of misconduct were true.

Source:  The Oregonian, March 21, 1906.

David Bucklew

Red Bluff, Sept. 28. – David Bucklew was shot and fatally wounded at 10 o’clock this morning near Hunter School House, twenty-five miles west of Red Bluff by his neighbor, William Ham, who says he fired in self defense.  Bucklew was shot as he was riding in a wagon.  The team ran 200 yards with him and struck a tree near Ross Gossett’s house.  The pistol bullet entered his forehead and he lived two hours, not regaining consciousness.  His pistol and hat were found near where the shooting occurred.  Ham came to town and two hours later was arrested by Sheriff Bogard.  After a conference with his attorney he admitted firing the fatal shot.  There was an old grudge between the two men and Bucklew always carried a pistol.  Ham was armed when they met this morning and it is supposed that when Bucklew drew his pistol Ham was too quick for him.  Ham has made no statement of the details.

Source:  San Francisco Call, September 29, 1902.