William Murphy Dies

Retired Banker Here

William David Murphy, 71, of 2650 Martin Road, prominent retired Zanesville banker and civic leader, died at 9:43 a.m. Friday in Bethesda Hospital where he had been a patient since July 10.

Mr. Murphy was born Nov. 7, 1900, in Fayette, Ohio, a son of Dr. William and Nellie Murphy.

His family moved to Columbus when he was a boy and he attended schools there, graduating from Ohio State University in 1923. He studied law at Franklin University and passed the bar in 1928. While in school he helped himself financially by selling clothing, and as a messenger for Citizens Bank and Trust Company in Columbus. He remained with the bank when it merged with the Ohio National Bank.

When Ohio National started its branch program in the late 1920s, he served in various executive capacities and in 1929 the Banc-Ohio Corp. was formed and began buying banks in various cities. In 1930, when Citizens National was organized by the merger of four Zanesville banks, Murphy was assigned to Zanesville to supervise its promotion program. He was elected cashier and a member of the Citizens board of directors in May 1931, vice president and cashier in 1945, and president in January 1947, succeeding Henry J. Knoedler. Her retired Dec. 31, 1965, at the age of 65.

He had been an associate trustee of Bethesda Hospital; trustee, treasurer, and past president of the Muskingum Motor Club; and a trustee of the Abbot Home for Men. He was a past campaign chairman of the Community Fund. In 1961 he was appointed chairman of Ohio State University’s Development Fund and in 1966 served as chairman of the Muskingum Area Trade School campaign finance committee.

He was a member and elder of Central Presbyterian Church, a former member of the trustees and past president of the church Brotherhoods; a member of the Rotary Club, Zanesville Country Club, Amity Lodge F&AM, Aladdin Shrine and Zavi Shrine Club.

Surviving are his widow, the former Margaret Foster of the home; a son, William F. Murphy of Route 8; a daughter, Mrs. John (Margaret) McConnell, of Minneapolis, Minn.; seven grandchildren; and a brother, John Murphy of Columbus. A brother, Roy, is deceased.

Friends may call 7 to 9 p.m. today and 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Sunday at Bryan Funeral Home.

Lodge of Amity 5 F&AM will hold services at 7 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home.

Source: Zanesville Times Recorder, July 29, 1972.

Advertisements

Blanche Foster & Louis Brannan

Miss Blanche Foster of Round Lake and Louis A. Brannan of Fort Klamath were married today by Rev. Geo. H. Feese of the Grace Methodist church. The groom is a prominent rancher of Wood River Valley, and the bride is one of the most popular school teachers of the county. She has been teaching at Fort Klamath the past two years.

Source: Klamath Falls Evening Herald, July 17, 1912.

Leila Rorick & Albert Foster

Morenci, Mich., Sept. 17 – A most beautiful wedding occurred on Wednesday at noon at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Cosper Rorick, when their daughter, Leila, was united in marriage to Mr. Albert Foster. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Trevor C. Jones in the presence of a large number of guests, all of whom, however, were immediate relatives or near friends of the contracting parties.

The color scheme of the decorations was green and white, and was carried out in white asters, white carnations, lilies, and smilax; while just back of the improvised altar was a massive bank of palms. The bride was dressed in cream crepe de chine and carried a shower bouquet of white rosebuds. She was attended by her cousins, Miss Irene Jewett, of Dayton, O., and Miss Bessie Bennett, of Detroit. These bridesmaids were becomingly gowned in white, and carried shower bouquets of pink roses. Mr. Shirley Foster, brother of the groom, acted as best man, while Dr. Ewart and Mr. Norman Horton did duty as ushers.

Following the ceremony an elegant four course dinner was served, Mrs. Miller, of Adrian, being the caterer, while Jackson’s orchestra, of the same city, discoursed sweet music.

The gifts were numerous and costly, consisting mainly of cut-glass, silver, china and linen. Among these were a set of solid silver all in the same pattern, of knives, forks, tea, dessert and table spoons, oyster forks, from the immediate family of the bride, and one hundred dollars in gold from Mr. Oscar Foster, the groom’s father.

Mr. and Mrs. Foster left on the afternoon car for Toledo, Detroit, and other points of interest. After their return they will reside in their new home on East street, which is already prepared for their occupancy. Mrs. Foster is a graduate of Adrian college, and was for the last two years a teacher in our public schools, where her work was of a very high order. Socially she is much admired and greatly esteemed for her many excellent qualities. Mr. Foster is cashier of the First National bank, which position he has held for four years. He is a young man of excellent business qualities and a great favorite in society.

The guests from out of town were Mr. Horton Rorick, wife and daughter; Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Spitzer, Toledo; Mrs. Rorick Bennett and daughters, Mrs. Willis Clark, Miss Bessie Bennett, Detroit; Mrs. Dr. Jewett and daughter, Irene, of Dayton, O.; Mr. George Horton and family, Fruit Ridge; Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester Porter, Packard; Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Foster, Mr. and Mrs. Byron Foster, Mr. and Mrs. Will Foster, Shirley Foster, Orlin Rumsey, Mrs. and Miss Carmichael, Hudson.

Source: Adrian Daily Telegram, September 17, 1903.

Small Town News—Adrian Daily Telegram

Morenci—The Misses Marilyn Bryant and Pricilla Downer will leave Monday to being their school year at Siena Heights College in Adrian.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 11, 1943)

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Foster of Toledo called Sunday on Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Rorick.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 26, 1943)

Mrs. Harper Gallup and children are spending a few days with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gallup of Kingsley-st.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, July 29, 1922)

Medina — Miss Helen Guss accompanied by Miss Helen Austin was home from Ypsilanti for the week-end.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 28, 1925)

Mr. and Mrs. Harlow Ingall of Plymouth and their daughter Miss Harriet Ingall of New York City were guests Friday of his parents Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ingall.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, August 10, 1943)

Miss Pearl Jones returned last evening from a pleasant visit with her cousin Dr. E.H. Rorick and family of Fayette, O.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 17, 1910)

Mr. and Mrs. William Jones and daughter, Pearl, were in Rollin Monday, attending the funeral of a brother’s child.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 2, 1905)

Sgt. and Mrs. Jacob Martz arrived Saturday from Portland, Ore., to spend a week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.H. Rorick and family.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 13, 1943)

Mrs. W.C. McConnell is in Morenci, to attend the funeral of her grandfather, Mr. Rorick, who died Saturday. (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 17, 1898)

Mrs. E.E. Spear entertained Tuesday afternoon in honor of Mrs. Maurice Spear. The time was spent socially and Miss Lorena Johnson favored the company with music. Decoration in keeping with the season were [sic] attractive and refreshments were served. The guests were Mrs. G.H. Rorick, Mrs. C.H. Rorick, Mrs. Curtis Rorick, Mrs. Mary Rorick, Mrs. Frank Tayloe, Mrs. Fred oon [sic], Mrs. William Poucher, Mrs. George Pratt, Mrs. Paul Spear, Mrs. Kenneth Spear and Mrs. Richard Rogers. (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 2, 1925)

Dr. Maurice Spear is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E.E. Spear. Dr. Spear and wife recently received their diplomas from the Palmer School of Chiropractors in Davenport, Ia., and will located in Adrian.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, October 7, 1921)

Paul Spear of Claunch, N.M., a former Morenci resident, arrived Thursday evening to visit his brother Kenneth Spear and sister Mrs. Richard Rogers and family and other relatives. He will spend the weekend with his sister Mrs. Ray Lyons and family in Adrian. (Adrian Daily Telegram, October 16, 1943)

Well Known Morenci Resident Passes Away

Mark C. Rorick, older son of Cosper and Nancy A. Breese Rorick, was born on a farm in Seneca township, Michigan Dec. 7, 1845 and died Feb. 6, 1922. His brother Leroy W. was born Sept. 14, 1847. He lived with his parents in a log house until the brick house was built in ’68. Cosper Rorick, father of M.C. Rorick, had a small clearing 3-4 mile north of what is now Seneca village, woods being on all sides. Canandaigua was the nearest post office and trading point combined and traveling was accomplished entirely by ox team or by horse back. The nearest church was at Medina, seven miles distant, and this they attended every Sunday morning. It was necessary to make an early start as they drove an ox team and wagon with a board across the wagon box for the little boys.

When about five years of age “Mark” commenced school in the home district 2 1/2 miles way in the Rorick district today. He walked back and forth to school. When the Tufts school house was being built he attended school in a part of the James Lord home, temporarily.

A part of the home farm was deeded for school purposes and the new building was considered adequate for that time. One feature differing from today was the interior arrangement by which the boys and girls sat facing one another. Then he attended school in Canandaigua and later at Medina Academy for one year, where he and his brother boarded themselves.

Adrian was the center of trade for the county at that time and they planned to make the return trip in a day to that point when taking produce, which made a long hard day.

About this time he met the girl of his choice, Mary S. Porter, who was attending Medina Academy. They were married at the parsonage in Medina by Rev. Boyington, Aug. 9, 1868, which was a surprise to their near relatives, as a triple wedding had been under consideration to include Estell H. Rorick and S.K. Porter, who were married the 20th of the same month.

Mr. and Mrs. Rorick lived for one year with his parents in the brick house when they bought 40 acres adjoining on the south and moved into a log house, where they spent one winter and two summers. While the log house was a shelter it would not seem livable to the young folks of today, being of one room with a loft overhead. The windows were stationary and of six small panes.

With great resourcefulness the lack of a clock was overcome by the ingenious device of drawing a line at a certain angle on the doorstep so on a sunny day the young housewife cold tell when to start preparations for dinner. On account of the discomforts of winter the young couple moved back with the parents into the commodious brick house. They sold their forty acres, bought forty of Mr. Rorick’s father and added more to it until there were the 185 acres now owned by John P. Rorick. They remained here until they came to Morenci twenty-seven years ago.

In 1870 the Wabash railroad was built through Seneca and a little village sprang up, including a post office and church. Soon they felt the need of a new church and Mr. Rorick was, with others, successful in soliciting funds for a new building.

Their home was always open to traveling ministers, school masters, singing teachers, or whoever came to the little church for special occasions. It was always a great satisfaction to Mr. Rorick to be able to entertain his friends in his home and to act as host at his bountiful table. His hospitality was unquestioned. Later this church burned to the ground and Mr. Rorick contributed liberally toward a new one, and before this was completed it was struck by lightning and again burned down, to all of which he helped materially.

For many years he was school director and was always interested in anything pertaining to the public good. He was ambitious and unusually strong. He cleared a large amount of land with the ox team. A singular coincidence may be mentioned in that M.C. Rorick and his brother Leroy married sisters, lived in close relationship on adjoining farms and each had a son born on the same day.

The father, Cosper Rorick, died in 1874. To Mr. and Mrs. Rorick were born three children, John Porter, Myrtie, wife of E.N. Baldwin of Fayette, O., and Maude, who died at the age of fourteen.

Mr. Rorick was one of the first dairy farmers in the county, sending his milk to the Horton cheese factory. He took great interest in the county fair, acting as judge for several years, also in the three town Pioneer picnic, which was held annually in a grove near Seneca.

His heart was always with the farmer and his problems, which he solved by himself by hard work, good business judgment and strictest economy. All through his life in Morenci his love remained for the old home on the farm, which though the early years were full of hardship was sacred with the memories of home life.

After coming to Morenci Mr. Rorick entered the retail grocery and meat business, also wool and stock buying. Her purchased at different times more farms which he improved and cultivated.

He joined the Knights of Pythias order as charter member, and has been one of the most loyal, active members to the time of his death.

He had a gift of being able to rise and represent the order, whether at home or in the lodge room of a neighboring town, in a very pleasing manner. His mother’s death occurred in 1912 and the brother Leroy in 1917. The brothers loved each other with a deep loyalty, in fact love of family was a strong characteristic of the deceased.

For many years the Rorick family reunion was an annual event of importance and his home was always ready for the gathering if needed. Mr. and Mrs. Rorick celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary some three years ago. One of the greatest problems before the American people today would be solved if the example of their home life could be more closely imitated. The question comes to one’s mind, with their advantages of education and means, the younger men and women of today will take up the work of the passing generation and apply to it the same amount of ambition and courage. If so what wonderful things may be accomplished.

There remain thirteen grandchildren who have a splendid heritage of honesty, thrift, integrity, loyalty and ambition. Mr. Rorick was strong in the principles he believed to be right, a strong advocate of temperance, staunch member of the Democratic party, always interested in matters of public interest with careful, prompt attention to detail of the management of his farms, which would mean success in any business enterprise. He possessed an unusually social nature and many friends will miss his face at the window, as he would wave a friendly hand to passersby and welcome calls from his physician and friends.

The grandchildren even to the youngest, will never forget the welcome always awaiting them at grandfather’s home.

In the passing of Mr. Rorick the last of the double cousins to bear the Rorick name, descendants of the three Rorick brothers who married three Breese sisters, has gone. But the closing of a well ordered and well spent life bears out the prophecy of Job,

Thou shalt come to thy grave in a full age,
like a shock of corn cometh in his season.

The funeral service was held at 2 o’clock, Wednesday, at the home on Main Street and was conducted by Rev. H.A. Manahn and Judge B.L. Hart. The remains were laid to rest in Oak Grove Cemetery. The pall bearers were John Poucher, C.F. Buck, Oliver Onweller, A.A. Kennedy, Ed. Gallup and Tom Snow.

Those from out of town who were in attendance at the funeral were E.N. Baldwin of Fayette, Mrs. W.D. Murphy of Columbus, John Cole of Weston, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Crane, John Rorick and F.T. Sullivan of Fayette, A.V. Foster of Toledo, Mr. and Mrs. George Horton of Fruit Ridge, E.B. Root of Adrian, Judge and Mrs. B.L. Hart of Adrian, Melvin McCloe of Detroit, Mr. and Mrs. James Scott and Mrs. Carl Guss of Medina, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Porter of Weston and Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Moore of Canandaigua.

Source:  Lundahl, Helen Rorick.  (n.d.) The Rorick Family in America.  (NB: This manuscript is held in the Toledo-Lucas County Library and contains a number of transcriptions of undated newspaper clippings.)

A Well Known Citizen Gone

Death of Leroy W. Rorick at his Home in Morenci Last Saturday Morning

Leroy W. Rorick, a well known citizen of Morenci, died at his home here last Saturday morning, March 10, 1917, after an illness of several months. The funeral service was held Monday under the direction of the K. of P. Lodge of which he was a member.

Judge B.L. Hart of Adrian and Hon. B.D. Chandler of Hudson, who represented the order, gave words of sympathy and helpfulness to the bereaved family.

Miss Virginia Wilson sang a solo. The out of town relatives who attended the funeral were: Mrs. William Rorick of Buffalo, N.Y., Mrs. Spencer Sloan, Mrs. Della McCloe, H.C. Rorick and wife, A.V. Foster and wife of Toledo, J.C. Rorick of Wauseon, Dr. and Mrs. E.H. Rorick, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sullivan, P.F. Cawley and daughter, Helen, Earl Baldwin and wife, John Rorick and Mrs. G.H. Crane of Fayette, Hon. G.B. Horton and John Cole of Weston.

Leroy W. Rorick was born in Seneca township, Sept. 14, 1847. His father, Cosper Rorick, a native of New Jersey, came to Michigan in 1840 and commenced with the pioneers in the work of changing a wilderness to a domain of elegant homes and productive farms. His father was married to Nancy A. Breese, Jan. 15, 1845, and they settled on a farm one mile north of Seneca in a log house with primitive surroundings, where Leroy was born. He grew up on the farm laboring with his father in the fields as boys in those days did and walking two and a half miles to a district school house for his education which was completed at the Medina Academy.

He was married Feb. 10, 1870 to Harriet L. Porter to whom were born one daughter, Nellie R., wife of Dr. Murphy of Columbus, OH and Cosper M., cashier of the First National Bank of Morenci. He commenced the work of an active life on the farm where he resided until 1888, when he moved to Morenci where he lived a retired life for one year, then going to Fayette where he purchased a livery business which he successfully followed for nine years. Disposing of the same, he followed the business of harness making for about six years in Morenci, after he which he purchased a farm two miles west of Weston where he resided about three years. He then purchased a small country home near Seneca where he lived until the spring of 1916 when he built a home and moved to Morenci.

His life has been a full demonstration of industry, kindness and business integrity and his faithful friends are numerous wherever he is known. His departure is mourned by all who knew him. He is survived by one brother, Mark C. Rorick of Morenci.

Source:  Lundahl, Helen Rorick.  (n.d.) The Rorick Family in America.  (NB: This manuscript is held in the Toledo-Lucas County Library and contains a number of transcriptions of undated newspaper clippings.)

Golden Wedding Anniversary

Dr. and Mrs. E.H. Rorick of Fayette, OH and Mr. and Mrs. S.K. Porter of Morenci, Mich., celebrated their golden wedding anniversaries at the Blair Hotel in Morenci, Thursday, Aug. 22. It is an unusual and remarkable occurrence for two couples to come down through life together, as has been the case with Dr. and Mrs. Rorick and Mr. and Mrs. Porter.

In the center of a flower-decked table on which a sumptuous dinner was served, was a large basket of golden-hearted Ophelia roses, a remembrance from the guests. The brides each wore a quaint corsage bouquet, the gift of Dr. Rorick Bennett, of Detroit. In the afternoon ice cream, cake and punch were served on the spacious lawn on S.K. Porter, East Main Street.

The double wedding ceremony was performed in the parsonage by Rev. James Noynton, the pastor of the Baptist church at Medina. Both couples have a large circle of friends and acquaintances who extend to them congratulations upon this rare occasion.

The guests were Mr. and Mrs. A.V. Foster, Hon. and Mrs. Horton C. Rorick of Toledo, Mrs. (Dr.) Rorick Bennett and daughter Mrs. George Clark of Detroit, Mrs. and Mrs. Fred Sullivan, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Crane of Fayette, Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Rorick of Wauseon, Mr. and Mrs. M.C. Rorick, Mr. and Mrs. C.M. Rorick, Mr. and Mrs. G.H. Rorick, Mr. and Mrs. J.P. Rorick, Mrs. Amelia Rorick, Mrs. Amy Rorick, Mr. and Mrs. H.E. Spear, Mrs. P.H. Spear and Mr. and Mrs. L.H. Converse.

S.K. Porter and Mary Rorick were residents of Seneca Township at the time of their marriage, both living near Seneca Village. After their marriage, they continued to live on the Porter homestead until recent years, when they retired to Morenci. Mr. Porter was Vice President of the First National Bank until recently when he resigned that he might be free from the duties imposed by the position.

Estell Rorick and Mary Acker were residents of Morenci at the time of their marriage. Later, Mr. Rorick took his medical courses at the U. of M. He practiced at Tedrow and then located at Fayette, which pace has been his home except for a short period of years when he resided in Columbus, OH.

The warmth of their genial presence in the community where they reside has left ever a wholesome atmosphere of cheer.

Dr. Rorick in his profession during the past years had been able to enter the hearts of many homes and to have part in the deepest things of many lives. He has time and again given material aid in a silent and inauspicious way to those who will never forget. Generosity pure and simple is an attribute not amiss for Dr. and Mrs. Rorick

When Fayette was struggling in the its steps of progress support was always coming from the Rorick home. Perhaps there is no better way to describe the attitude of these people toward the community than in the words of the poet, “Write me as one who loves his fellow men,” and as a seeming reward for such helpful living, youthful mind and heart have remained with both, and this through half a century. It is not for us to estimate the value of such a home.

Source:  Lundahl, Helen Rorick.  (n.d.) The Rorick Family in America.  (NB:  This manuscript is held in the Toledo-Lucas County Library and contains a number of transcriptions of undated newspaper clippings).

Hannah Breese Rorick

One by one the pioneers who prepared the way for the religious and material prosperity of our state are passing from our midst. We do well to pause in our rapid life and look back upon the times and conditions out of which they brought law, order, and prosperity from the primitive forest and savage conditions.

Mrs. Hannah Rorick, born in 1819 in Chemung County, N.Y., was married to Deacon Estell Rorick in 1836. They came to Lenawee County in 1837 and settled in the wild unbroken country and worked out for themselves and their children character and material prosperity worthy of all founders of our state. Early in her married life, joining the visible Church of God, she was for nearly 60 years a member of the Baptist Church. First in all good work for Church and State, earnest, careful for essential things of both religion and government, but liberal to all the differing views.

Their home was open for other denominations as well as their own. Their open hand was ready for the cause of Christ by whomsoever represented. In the fullness of years, God has called her to himself and to the husband who preceded her 16 years ago.

At her funeral, which was conducted by her pastor, Rev. J. McLean, from the home of her daughter, Mrs. S.K. Porter of Seneca, were gathered her children, Cosper Rorick, Mrs. P.H. Spear, Mrs. Rorick Bennett and Mrs. Porter with their children and grandchildren, a goodly number of strong earnest men and women of two generations who will honor her memory and in her life find an example worthy of their emulation and inspiration to higher living and a check to the temptations which assail them in the battle of life.

Mrs. G.H. Crane and Mrs. A.V. Foster of Toledo are granddaughters of Mrs. Rorick. The Estell Rorick farm is where Herbert Rorick, a great-grandson lives.

Source: The Christian Herald, November 19, 1897.

Links

Following are links to additional information about the Roricks and related families.

Albert V. Foster — From the Toledo’s Attic Website.

Beneath the Starry Flag: New Jersey’s Civil War Experience — A book that includes a description of Captain Lewis Van Blarcom’s experience as a prison of war at the Andersonville prison.

Colleen Gormley’s Page — Related families in Lenawee County, MI.

Columbia Gorge Photo Archives — Use the search feature to find pictures of Eck Rorick as a young man playing baseball and leading a dance band. There is also a photo of the Celilo train crash that killed Mrs. J.N. Walling and her grandson.

George Edward Anderson Collection at BYU — Use the search feature to find photos of Roe A. Deal and his wife, Louise Rorick Deal.

History of Dallesport — Information on J.T. Rorick’s role in the history of this town.

Horton C. Rorick — From the Toledo’s Attic website.

Internet Broadway Database — Information on the career of Gabriel LeRoy “Roy” Walling, actor, playwright, producer, as well as that of his wife, Ruth Guiterman.

Kari Northrup’s Page — Information on the Brees family, including descendants of the three Breese sisters who married the three Rorick brothers.

History of Klickitat County, WA — Information on J.T. Rorick’s role in the early history of this county.

Letter of Mollie Zemmer — Transcription of letter written on the Oregon Trail by Mollie Zemmer, wife of Enos C. Walling.

Loseyite — A mineral found in Sussex County, NJ and named after Samuel R. Losey.

Mary Van Blarcom — Information on her career as an artist and samples of her work.

Mueller Museum — Dedicated to the Mueller family of Decatur, IL.

Nancy Pascal’s Page — A valuable resource for anyone researching Sussex County families.

Old West End Toledo — Use the search feature to look for photos of the Rorick house on Collingwood Avenue.

Historic Images of Oregon — Use the search feature to find some Walling family photographs.

Rhonda Yocom’s Page — Information on the Search and Yocom families of Muskingum County, OH.

Spear Brothers Group — Company run by descendants of Philetus Spear and Deborah Rorick.

Sutton Family Genealogy — Dennis Sutton’s page includes information on the descendants of Hannah Rorick and Jacob Sutton.

Tyrrell Historical Library — Donated to Beaumont, TX by Capt. W.C. Tyrrell in memory of his wife Helen Frances Rorick.

 

George H. Rorick

There are many native sons of Lenawee county who are prominently identified with the agricultural industry within its borders, and none can but feel that their “lines are cast in pleasant places” and that properly directed energies will bring goodly returns in said connection.  One of the appreciative farmers of Seneca township, where he owns a fine landed estate, is Mr. Rorick, who maintains a dairy business, devoted especially to the manufacturing of cheese.  He was born on the present farm of Frank Bryant, north of Seneca village, and the date of his nativity was June 28, 1864.  He is a son of Casper and Alice Horton Rorick, the former of whom was born in Seneca township, this county, Oct. 8, 1838, a member of one of the honored pioneer families of the county, and the latter was born in Medina county, Ohio.  Casper Rorick was reared and educated in Lenawee County, and his early farming operations in an independent way were conducted upon a place of 160 acres, in his native township.  Later he sold this property and became the owner of the fine farm of 220 acres, which is now owned and occupied by his eldest son, the subject of this sketch.  He continued to give his active supervision to the farm until 1894, when he removed to the village of Morenci, where he has since lived; Horton C. , who resides in the city of Toledo, Ohio; Eva May, who is the wife of George H. Crane, of Fayette, Ohio; and Leila Estell, who is the wife of Albert Foster, of Morenci.  After duly availing himself of the advantages of the district schools of Seneca township, George H. Rorick continued his studies in Medina Academy, this county, and later completed a course in Evans Business College, in the city of Adrian, the metropolis and judicial center of the county.  Upon initiating his independent career, he purchased a farm of 120 acres, in Seneca township.  After living nine years on this farm he purchased the old homestead of 220 acres, where he has since continued most successful operations as a general farmer, stock-grower and dairyman.  He has made numerous improvements on the farm, which is one of the model places of Seneca township.  His cheese factory is located in the village of Seneca, is thoroughly modern in its equipment, and its annual output averages about 300,000 pounds.  For several years he conducted a large business in the buying and shipping of cattle, sheep and hog.  Mr. Rorick is well known as one of the progressive business men and loyal and public-spirited citizens of his native county, where he is held in high esteem by all who know him.  On Sept. 17, 1885, Mr. Rorick was united in marriage to Miss Edith Kennedy, who was born and reared in Seneca township, and who is a daughter of Lyman and Frances Elizabeth (Schneider) Kennedy, the former of whom was born in Boston, Mass., Sept. 18, 1834, and the latter in Wood county, Ohio, Dec. 16, 1841.  Lyman Kennedy came with his parents to the West in 1838, and was reared to maturity in Fulton county, Ohio, where he became a representative farmer and influential citizen.  About 1887, he retired from active labors and since that time he and his wife have maintained their home in the village of Morenci.  Mr. and Mrs. Rorick have two sons, Casper H. and Curtis K., both of whom are associated with their father in his business operations, and both of whom are popular young men of the county in which they are representatives of the third generation of a sterling pioneer family.

Source:  Bonner, Richard Illenden.  1909.  Memoirs of Lenawee County, Michigan.  Madison, WI:  Western Historical Association.