Mueller News Items

Mr. Lucien Mueller left Thursday for Ithaca, N.Y., where he will attend the graduation exercises of his brother, Clarence, and also the ten year reunion of his class at Cornell University. Mr. Mueller will return to Decatur June 27. (Decatur Review, June 7, 1927)

Mrs. Lucien Mueller entertained three tables at bridge on Tuesday afternoon, honoring her mother, Mrs. W.M. Rorick, who has been visiting her for several weeks. Mrs. Rorick will leave Monday for her home in Detroit, Mich. (Decatur Review, January 29, 1922)

Mrs. Lucien Mueller has returned from a visit in Detroit and Sarnia, Ontario, with relatives. (Decatur Review, July 15, 1929)

MUELLER-METZLER PARTY RETURNING. Mr. and Mrs. Lucien Mueller and Mrs. and Mrs. A.M. Metzler are leaving California today for their return trip to Decatur. The two couples will make several stops on the way home. On the way to the West Coast, they visited Decatur persons who are passing the winter in Arizona. (Decatur Review, January 25, 1931)

The Porritt Dairy

The Middleton Dairy has been purchased by Edward Porritt of Clarkston and the milk processing machinery is to be moved to the present Porritt Dairy on the Orion-Clarkston road, near the Grand Trunk R.R. Cleon Middleton, who has operated the Dairy during the past 17 years, is retaining the Ice Cream Manufacturing end of the business and will devote his entire time to this product. Mr. Middleton has contributed much to the dairy business over the past several years, erecting the building which houses the plant in 1938 and enlarging the facilities. The Porritt Dairy has been in continuous operation since 1921 when it was founded by Lee Porritt, father of the present owner. The son, Edward, purchased the business from his father in 1933 and has operated it continuously ever since. Mr. Porritt advises that machinery for making pressed paper milk bottles is being installed and will be in operation about January 1st, 1948. Both parties agreed that the recent tendency of a business of this character toward specialization made the new arrangements advisable.  (Orion Weekly Review, August 8, 1947)

In 1921 Lee Porritt started what was to become one of the finest dairies in our area. From a small herd of 12 cows and horse-drawn vehicle he bottled and delivered milk throughout the near by lake area. Because of poor health, in 1933 he sold his business to his son Edward who continued to service the area and to expand to neighboring communities. As sales increased the milk production of several nearby farms was needed. In 1939 Porritt moved to the present location at 1758 Clarkston Rd. Even though a fire completely destroyed the original wood frame building and all the delivery equipment, Porritt did not miss one delivery after the fire. The Porritt Dairy has continued to expand, and several other dairies were purchased in the nearby area. Milk is procured from various farmers in Oakland, Lapeer and Macomb counties and employment has been provided for 35 persons in the area. William “Bill” Porritt, Edward’s son, grew up helping his Dad in the dairy. After serving in the Army during World War II, he took a course at Michigan State in dairying. Upon his return to the business, Bill was appointed business manager and made a partner in the concern. The Porritt family owes a great deal of their success to the fact that they have always given their customers the best that can be had in pure milk, cream and other dairy products. (Lake Orion Review, September 19, 1969)

Joshua P. Sutton

THIRTY-TWO YEARS AGO [1903]: Judge J.P. Sutton and wife were entertained Wednesday and Thursday at the Predmore and Coon homes. Mr. Sutton is assistant superintendent of the soldiers’ home at Leavenworth, Kansas. Mrs. Sutton will be remembered by the older settlers as Miss Nellie Shadbolt. They have two grownup children, a married daughter living in Kansas City and a son in Johannesburg, S.A. Mr. Sutton was the first village marshal and tells of the village lock-up. He said in those days a little stockade built of boards six feet high without a roof served as the bastille and when a man became drunk — and in those days there were lots of them — he would lock his prisoner in and allow him to climb out when he had sufficiently sobered up. Pretty hard on the justices of those days. This failed to work, he notes, in the case of “N—– Charley,” a village character of those days, who would persist in digging himself out contrary to regulation.

Source:  Lake Orion Review, July 5, 1935)

Small Town News—Port Jervis

The largest apples by far that we have ever seen are now displayed in Vail Brothers show window. They are called pound sours or [unclear] apples. The two weigh three pounds and seven ounces, and one measures 15¼ and another 15¼ around. They were grown on the farm of Lewis Cox, about a mile and a half beyond Deckertown, and were picked from the trees by W.H. Dewitt of this village, a brother-in-law of Mr. Cox. (Port Jervis Evening Gazette, October 16, 1880)

We learn from the Middletown Press that Jonathan Dewitt, of Deckertown, last Sunday made a call at the house of G.R. Carr. A political discussion ensued, which waxed very warm, and finally ended in Mr. Carr ordering him from his house and, as he had no inclination to do so, struck him with a chair, when he got out. He was bruised a little. (Port Jervis Evening Gazette, December 2, 1876)

The youngest child of William H. Dewitt, the builder, was Tuesday taken very sick. Dr. Hunt was called, and he pronounces the disease diphtheria, the first well-defined case in Port Jervis since last winter. (Port Jervis Evening Gazette, February 1, 1881)

The donation of the Rev. D.E. Frambes of Montague, Sussex county, N.J., will take place at the Brick House on Wednesday evening, Dec. 20th, instead of the 30th, as previously stated. (Port Jervis Evening Gazette, December 14, 1876)

The old barns on the Rorick English [sic] farm, at Monroe Corner, were totally destroyed by fire Monday evening of last week with the contents, consisting of farming implements, harness and a large amount of hay and grain. (Port Jervis Gazette, October 28, 1880)

Small Town News—Salt Lake City

SPRINGVILLE — Work began this week on a handsome new brick residence for Roe Deal.  (Salt Lake Herald, March 14, 1900)

SPRINGVILLE — Roe A. Deal and wife left for their home in Alberta, Canada, yesterday afternoon.  They came down to the funeral of Mr. Deal’s father some few weeks ago.  (Salt Lake Herald, September 23, 1903)

SPRINGVILLE — Mrs. Roe Deal was a Salt Lake visitor for a few days this week.  (Salt Lake Herald-Republican, February 27, 1910)

Springville — The Women’s club members were guests of the Ladies’ Literary Club Friday at the home of Mrs. T.R. Kelly.  Refreshments were served by the hostess, assisted by Mrs. Roe Deal. (Salt Lake Herald-Republican, November 28, 1909)

Small Town News—Newark Advocate

Master Otis Chrysler of Gahanna is vesting his cousin, Hugh Boyd McGlade, this week.  (Newark Advocate, June 29, 1916)

Mrs. Emma Fleming of 144 South Second street is recovering from a serious operation performed a few days ago.  (Newark Advocate, August 20, 1917)

Mrs. Delbert Mason entertained Wednesday evening the members of the Brownsville band and their families at their home, 265 Rugg avenue in honor of Mr. Mason’s 28th birthday anniversary. The event was in the nature of a surprise for Mr. Mason. Mr. Mason is a member of the band. After the band rendered several selections refreshments were served to more than fifty guests. (Newark Advocate, August 16, 1919)

Xenophen McIntosh and daughters, Emma and Helen, of Newark, spent Sunday with Mr. McIntosh’s parents Mr. and Mrs. David McIntosh and family, of East Broadway. (Newark Advocate, March 16, 1904)

Mrs. Xenophen McIntosh and daughter, Miss Helen McIntosh, of 144 South Second street, are visiting friends at Rochelle. (Newark Advocate, August 27, 1904)

Mr. G.W. Todd, who suffered a stroke of paralysis at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Frank Beals, is very ill and very little hope is held of his recovery. (Newark Advocate, October 15, 1907)

Small Town News—Adrian Daily Telegram

Morenci—The Misses Marilyn Bryant and Pricilla Downer will leave Monday to being their school year at Siena Heights College in Adrian.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 11, 1943)

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Foster of Toledo called Sunday on Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Rorick.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 26, 1943)

Mrs. Harper Gallup and children are spending a few days with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gallup of Kingsley-st.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, July 29, 1922)

Medina — Miss Helen Guss accompanied by Miss Helen Austin was home from Ypsilanti for the week-end.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 28, 1925)

Mr. and Mrs. Harlow Ingall of Plymouth and their daughter Miss Harriet Ingall of New York City were guests Friday of his parents Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ingall.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, August 10, 1943)

Miss Pearl Jones returned last evening from a pleasant visit with her cousin Dr. E.H. Rorick and family of Fayette, O.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 17, 1910)

Mr. and Mrs. William Jones and daughter, Pearl, were in Rollin Monday, attending the funeral of a brother’s child.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 2, 1905)

Sgt. and Mrs. Jacob Martz arrived Saturday from Portland, Ore., to spend a week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.H. Rorick and family.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 13, 1943)

Mrs. W.C. McConnell is in Morenci, to attend the funeral of her grandfather, Mr. Rorick, who died Saturday. (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 17, 1898)

Mrs. E.E. Spear entertained Tuesday afternoon in honor of Mrs. Maurice Spear. The time was spent socially and Miss Lorena Johnson favored the company with music. Decoration in keeping with the season were [sic] attractive and refreshments were served. The guests were Mrs. G.H. Rorick, Mrs. C.H. Rorick, Mrs. Curtis Rorick, Mrs. Mary Rorick, Mrs. Frank Tayloe, Mrs. Fred oon [sic], Mrs. William Poucher, Mrs. George Pratt, Mrs. Paul Spear, Mrs. Kenneth Spear and Mrs. Richard Rogers. (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 2, 1925)

Dr. Maurice Spear is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E.E. Spear. Dr. Spear and wife recently received their diplomas from the Palmer School of Chiropractors in Davenport, Ia., and will located in Adrian.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, October 7, 1921)

Paul Spear of Claunch, N.M., a former Morenci resident, arrived Thursday evening to visit his brother Kenneth Spear and sister Mrs. Richard Rogers and family and other relatives. He will spend the weekend with his sister Mrs. Ray Lyons and family in Adrian. (Adrian Daily Telegram, October 16, 1943)

Small Town News—Denton Journal

Mrs. and Mrs. Melvin Carroll visited Miss Lillie Doty at Cambridge Hospital, last Thursday. (Denton Journal, November 18, 1955)

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Dazier [sic], of Massachusetts; Mrs. Byron Poore and Mr. and Mrs. Edward Eveland and children, of Greensboro; Mr. Charles Boyle, of Queen Anne, visited Mr. and Mrs. John Eveland and family on Sunday. (Denton Journal, October 12, 1956)

Miss Anna Mae Doty, of Baltimore, spent the week-end with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Olin Doty, of near town. (Denton Journal, June 29, 1945)

Misses Virginia and Clara Tribbitt and Mssrs. Fred Satterfield and Graham Diggins spent Sunday with Mrs. E.W. Doty and family. (Denton Journal, September 23, 1911)

Mr. Jesse L. Doty, of near Binghamton, N.Y., has been recently visiting his cousins, Miss Lillie E. Doty and Mr. Olin C. Doty, of Greensboro, and Mrs. John Eveland of Hillsboro. (Denton Journal, November 5, 1948)

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Jarrell and son, Henry, of Centreville, spent Sunday with Mrs. Jarrell’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Olin Doty. (Denton Journal, July 29, 1945)

Miss Genevieve Poor [sic], of Greensboro, and Miss Mary Eveland have been visiting their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John Eveland. (Denton Journal, September 12, 1942)

Small Town News—Idaho Statesman

D.A. Baxter is back from his camping expedition. (Idaho Daily Statesman, August 23, 1900)

RETURNED HOME — Mrs. Frank Berkley, whose husband was killed near Pocatello, returned yesterday to Glenn’s Ferry, accompanied by her parents, Mrs. and Mrs. James Mullaney. (Idaho Daily Statesman, July 7, 1901)

Mrs. F.B. Berkley and Mrs. James Mullany went to Pocatello on Monday last to settle the affairs of the late F.B. Berkley. (Idaho Daily Statesman, July 18, 1901)

Mrs. Frank Berkley is visiting in Nampa, the guest of Mrs. B.F. Walling. (Idaho Daily Statesman, August 31, 1901)

An examination of the returns from Highland Valley precinct discloses that a vote was cast for Mrs. Gile for constable. (Idaho Daily Statesman, November 16, 1898)

The eighty-sixth birthday of J.B. Walling was celebrated on Saturday last at the home of his son, Enos Walling, near this city. Mr. Walling has been a citizen of Idaho for more than half a century and his kind deeds have won for him scores of friends. He has been an elder in the Church of Christ since that church was established and has given liberally for its maintenance. He is quite feeble in body, but loves the society of his friends. Among the number present from Boise at the birthday dinner were Professor and Mrs. Kiggins and Rev. and Mrs. J.L. Weaver. Relatives were also present from Oregon. An excellent dinner was served and the afternoon was spent in songs and conversation. The guests all wish for Mr. Walling many happy returns of the day. (Idaho Statesman, August 28, 1895)

J.J. Walling was up from Caldwell Sunday. (Idaho Statesman, January 29, 1901)

Educational News

Sharon Carroll, daugher of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Carroll, has enrolled at the Goldey-Beacom School of Business for the summer session. (Denton Journal, June 21, 1923)

Those who received certificates of promotion from the seventh grade of Hillsboro school are Roberta Rowe, Dorothy Knotts, Hazel Passwaters, Mildred Worth, Pearl Eveland, Herbert Rice, John Eveland, and Lee Seymour. (Denton Journal, June 25, 1921)

Mr. and Mrs. John Eveland, Mrs. J.E. Eveland, and Miss Pearl Eveland attended commencement exercises at Western Maryland College last Monday. Thos. Eveland, a son of Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Eveland, was a graduate. (Denton Journal, June 13, 1936)

Stephen Ray Hanson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Marion R. Hanson of Junction City, has enrolled at Huntington College, Huntington, Ind. Huntington College is founded and supported by the Church of the United Brethren in Christ. (Zanesville Times Recorder, September 22, 1966)

Fairmont Seminary last night sent out its annual quota of cultured womanhood. Sixteen misses representing nine states and the District of Columbia, who have been making preparation for their future careers received their diplomas, certifying they are competent to assume “added rights and new responsibilities” in the parlance of Representative Victor Murdock, of Kansas, who delivered the address of the evening. The graduates are Mary Katharine Brown, of Ohio; Miss Lillian Beatty, of Ohio; Miss Dorothy Marie Borland, of Pennsylvania; Miss Ethel Louise Foster, of this city; Miss Virginia Guitar, of Texas; Miss Hazel Herr, of Pennsylvania; Miss Mabel Elizabeth Halloway, of Kansas; Miss Sarah Frances Hancock, of Texas; Miss Eliza Watts Killian, of South Carolina; Miss Katharine Lauck, of Pennsylvania; Miss Mildred Mann, of Missouri; Miss Ada Rorick McConnell, of Michigan; Miss Grace Marie McClelland, of Pennsylvania; Miss Mabel Clair Payne, of Arkansas; Miss Harriette Richardson, of Texas; and Miss Mattie Lee Yokley, of Tennessee. (Washington Post, May 28, 1910)

Miss Alice Van Sickle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Sickle has been selected as valedictorian of the graduating class of Port Jervis High School, it was announced today by Charles D. Marsh, principal. Maintaining the tradition of a number of years, Miss Van Sickle was chosen by virtue of her holding honor position in the class with the highest average for for years. (Middletown Times Herald, June 22, 1934)

Salem, May 13 — To-day were held the closing exercises of the Oregon school for the blind in the presence of a few invited guests and friends of the pupils. The programmes were very interesting, and consisted of exercises which those who have the full five senses might be proud to be able to render as well. These were not graduating exercises, and the entire class will return next year. The names of the pupils are: Ernest Voos, Portland; Bertie Waller, Salem; Fred V. Cooper, Portland; Misses Lou Lewis, Corvallis; Mollie Read, Mitchell, Wasco county; Blanche Savage, near Salem; Sadie Bristow, near Monmouth; Mary Baker, Silverton; Jess Watkins, Albany; Hattie Carruthers, Albany; Amy Walling, Polk county. The school is under the supervision of D.B. Gray; matron, Mrs. Gray; assistant teacher, Miss N.J. McFallen; music teacher, Miss Helen Holman. (Portland Oregonian, May 14, 1887)