Notable Wedding

G. Henry Crane and Miss Eva May Rorick, at Morenci

The wedding of G. Henry Crane, of this city, bookkeeper at C.B. Pennock’s novelty store, and Miss Eva May Rorick, daughter of Casper Rorick, of Morenci, took place last evening, at 7 o’clock, at the Congregational church, at Morenci, and was the swellest social function that ever took place in that pleasant little village.

The church was magnificently trimmed in a green and white effect, a profusion of palms being scattered about the room. Everyone of the large windows had row upon row of burning candles and at the altar candles were burning.

Rev. John McLean, of the Baptist church, performed Episcopal ceremony, and during its reading the ever sweet Traummeri was softly played on the organ.

A departure from the usual custom was the signing of Lohengrin’s wedding march by a chorus of female voices, concealed behind a handsome bank of palms. The effect was charming.

The bride and her maids were dressed in white organdie, and the gentlemen were in full dress. Dr. G.B.M. Seager appeared for Mr. Crane, and with Miss Rorick were Miss Horton, of Morenci, Miss Jewett, of Dayton, Ohio, and Lela Rorick. The bride carried lilies of the valley, Miss Jewett and Miss Horton carnations, and Lela Rorick American beauty roses.

The ushers were Clark Baldwin, Chas. Whiteney, Seward Wilcox and Theodore Wagner.

Following the ceremony a reception was held at the residence, and at about 1 o’clock the couple drove to North Morenci to take the Wabash west.

There were 45 who took a special on the [unclear] & L.N., and returning they reached Adrian about 2 o’clock.

Source: Adrian Daily Telegram, September 17, 1897.

Well Known Morenci Resident Passes Away

Mark C. Rorick, older son of Cosper and Nancy A. Breese Rorick, was born on a farm in Seneca township, Michigan Dec. 7, 1845 and died Feb. 6, 1922. His brother Leroy W. was born Sept. 14, 1847. He lived with his parents in a log house until the brick house was built in ’68. Cosper Rorick, father of M.C. Rorick, had a small clearing 3-4 mile north of what is now Seneca village, woods being on all sides. Canandaigua was the nearest post office and trading point combined and traveling was accomplished entirely by ox team or by horse back. The nearest church was at Medina, seven miles distant, and this they attended every Sunday morning. It was necessary to make an early start as they drove an ox team and wagon with a board across the wagon box for the little boys.

When about five years of age “Mark” commenced school in the home district 2 1/2 miles way in the Rorick district today. He walked back and forth to school. When the Tufts school house was being built he attended school in a part of the James Lord home, temporarily.

A part of the home farm was deeded for school purposes and the new building was considered adequate for that time. One feature differing from today was the interior arrangement by which the boys and girls sat facing one another. Then he attended school in Canandaigua and later at Medina Academy for one year, where he and his brother boarded themselves.

Adrian was the center of trade for the county at that time and they planned to make the return trip in a day to that point when taking produce, which made a long hard day.

About this time he met the girl of his choice, Mary S. Porter, who was attending Medina Academy. They were married at the parsonage in Medina by Rev. Boyington, Aug. 9, 1868, which was a surprise to their near relatives, as a triple wedding had been under consideration to include Estell H. Rorick and S.K. Porter, who were married the 20th of the same month.

Mr. and Mrs. Rorick lived for one year with his parents in the brick house when they bought 40 acres adjoining on the south and moved into a log house, where they spent one winter and two summers. While the log house was a shelter it would not seem livable to the young folks of today, being of one room with a loft overhead. The windows were stationary and of six small panes.

With great resourcefulness the lack of a clock was overcome by the ingenious device of drawing a line at a certain angle on the doorstep so on a sunny day the young housewife cold tell when to start preparations for dinner. On account of the discomforts of winter the young couple moved back with the parents into the commodious brick house. They sold their forty acres, bought forty of Mr. Rorick’s father and added more to it until there were the 185 acres now owned by John P. Rorick. They remained here until they came to Morenci twenty-seven years ago.

In 1870 the Wabash railroad was built through Seneca and a little village sprang up, including a post office and church. Soon they felt the need of a new church and Mr. Rorick was, with others, successful in soliciting funds for a new building.

Their home was always open to traveling ministers, school masters, singing teachers, or whoever came to the little church for special occasions. It was always a great satisfaction to Mr. Rorick to be able to entertain his friends in his home and to act as host at his bountiful table. His hospitality was unquestioned. Later this church burned to the ground and Mr. Rorick contributed liberally toward a new one, and before this was completed it was struck by lightning and again burned down, to all of which he helped materially.

For many years he was school director and was always interested in anything pertaining to the public good. He was ambitious and unusually strong. He cleared a large amount of land with the ox team. A singular coincidence may be mentioned in that M.C. Rorick and his brother Leroy married sisters, lived in close relationship on adjoining farms and each had a son born on the same day.

The father, Cosper Rorick, died in 1874. To Mr. and Mrs. Rorick were born three children, John Porter, Myrtie, wife of E.N. Baldwin of Fayette, O., and Maude, who died at the age of fourteen.

Mr. Rorick was one of the first dairy farmers in the county, sending his milk to the Horton cheese factory. He took great interest in the county fair, acting as judge for several years, also in the three town Pioneer picnic, which was held annually in a grove near Seneca.

His heart was always with the farmer and his problems, which he solved by himself by hard work, good business judgment and strictest economy. All through his life in Morenci his love remained for the old home on the farm, which though the early years were full of hardship was sacred with the memories of home life.

After coming to Morenci Mr. Rorick entered the retail grocery and meat business, also wool and stock buying. Her purchased at different times more farms which he improved and cultivated.

He joined the Knights of Pythias order as charter member, and has been one of the most loyal, active members to the time of his death.

He had a gift of being able to rise and represent the order, whether at home or in the lodge room of a neighboring town, in a very pleasing manner. His mother’s death occurred in 1912 and the brother Leroy in 1917. The brothers loved each other with a deep loyalty, in fact love of family was a strong characteristic of the deceased.

For many years the Rorick family reunion was an annual event of importance and his home was always ready for the gathering if needed. Mr. and Mrs. Rorick celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary some three years ago. One of the greatest problems before the American people today would be solved if the example of their home life could be more closely imitated. The question comes to one’s mind, with their advantages of education and means, the younger men and women of today will take up the work of the passing generation and apply to it the same amount of ambition and courage. If so what wonderful things may be accomplished.

There remain thirteen grandchildren who have a splendid heritage of honesty, thrift, integrity, loyalty and ambition. Mr. Rorick was strong in the principles he believed to be right, a strong advocate of temperance, staunch member of the Democratic party, always interested in matters of public interest with careful, prompt attention to detail of the management of his farms, which would mean success in any business enterprise. He possessed an unusually social nature and many friends will miss his face at the window, as he would wave a friendly hand to passersby and welcome calls from his physician and friends.

The grandchildren even to the youngest, will never forget the welcome always awaiting them at grandfather’s home.

In the passing of Mr. Rorick the last of the double cousins to bear the Rorick name, descendants of the three Rorick brothers who married three Breese sisters, has gone. But the closing of a well ordered and well spent life bears out the prophecy of Job,

Thou shalt come to thy grave in a full age,
like a shock of corn cometh in his season.

The funeral service was held at 2 o’clock, Wednesday, at the home on Main Street and was conducted by Rev. H.A. Manahn and Judge B.L. Hart. The remains were laid to rest in Oak Grove Cemetery. The pall bearers were John Poucher, C.F. Buck, Oliver Onweller, A.A. Kennedy, Ed. Gallup and Tom Snow.

Those from out of town who were in attendance at the funeral were E.N. Baldwin of Fayette, Mrs. W.D. Murphy of Columbus, John Cole of Weston, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Crane, John Rorick and F.T. Sullivan of Fayette, A.V. Foster of Toledo, Mr. and Mrs. George Horton of Fruit Ridge, E.B. Root of Adrian, Judge and Mrs. B.L. Hart of Adrian, Melvin McCloe of Detroit, Mr. and Mrs. James Scott and Mrs. Carl Guss of Medina, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Porter of Weston and Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Moore of Canandaigua.

Source:  Lundahl, Helen Rorick.  (n.d.) The Rorick Family in America.  (NB: This manuscript is held in the Toledo-Lucas County Library and contains a number of transcriptions of undated newspaper clippings.)

A Well Known Citizen Gone

Death of Leroy W. Rorick at his Home in Morenci Last Saturday Morning

Leroy W. Rorick, a well known citizen of Morenci, died at his home here last Saturday morning, March 10, 1917, after an illness of several months. The funeral service was held Monday under the direction of the K. of P. Lodge of which he was a member.

Judge B.L. Hart of Adrian and Hon. B.D. Chandler of Hudson, who represented the order, gave words of sympathy and helpfulness to the bereaved family.

Miss Virginia Wilson sang a solo. The out of town relatives who attended the funeral were: Mrs. William Rorick of Buffalo, N.Y., Mrs. Spencer Sloan, Mrs. Della McCloe, H.C. Rorick and wife, A.V. Foster and wife of Toledo, J.C. Rorick of Wauseon, Dr. and Mrs. E.H. Rorick, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sullivan, P.F. Cawley and daughter, Helen, Earl Baldwin and wife, John Rorick and Mrs. G.H. Crane of Fayette, Hon. G.B. Horton and John Cole of Weston.

Leroy W. Rorick was born in Seneca township, Sept. 14, 1847. His father, Cosper Rorick, a native of New Jersey, came to Michigan in 1840 and commenced with the pioneers in the work of changing a wilderness to a domain of elegant homes and productive farms. His father was married to Nancy A. Breese, Jan. 15, 1845, and they settled on a farm one mile north of Seneca in a log house with primitive surroundings, where Leroy was born. He grew up on the farm laboring with his father in the fields as boys in those days did and walking two and a half miles to a district school house for his education which was completed at the Medina Academy.

He was married Feb. 10, 1870 to Harriet L. Porter to whom were born one daughter, Nellie R., wife of Dr. Murphy of Columbus, OH and Cosper M., cashier of the First National Bank of Morenci. He commenced the work of an active life on the farm where he resided until 1888, when he moved to Morenci where he lived a retired life for one year, then going to Fayette where he purchased a livery business which he successfully followed for nine years. Disposing of the same, he followed the business of harness making for about six years in Morenci, after he which he purchased a farm two miles west of Weston where he resided about three years. He then purchased a small country home near Seneca where he lived until the spring of 1916 when he built a home and moved to Morenci.

His life has been a full demonstration of industry, kindness and business integrity and his faithful friends are numerous wherever he is known. His departure is mourned by all who knew him. He is survived by one brother, Mark C. Rorick of Morenci.

Source:  Lundahl, Helen Rorick.  (n.d.) The Rorick Family in America.  (NB: This manuscript is held in the Toledo-Lucas County Library and contains a number of transcriptions of undated newspaper clippings.)

Golden Wedding Anniversary

Dr. and Mrs. E.H. Rorick of Fayette, OH and Mr. and Mrs. S.K. Porter of Morenci, Mich., celebrated their golden wedding anniversaries at the Blair Hotel in Morenci, Thursday, Aug. 22. It is an unusual and remarkable occurrence for two couples to come down through life together, as has been the case with Dr. and Mrs. Rorick and Mr. and Mrs. Porter.

In the center of a flower-decked table on which a sumptuous dinner was served, was a large basket of golden-hearted Ophelia roses, a remembrance from the guests. The brides each wore a quaint corsage bouquet, the gift of Dr. Rorick Bennett, of Detroit. In the afternoon ice cream, cake and punch were served on the spacious lawn on S.K. Porter, East Main Street.

The double wedding ceremony was performed in the parsonage by Rev. James Noynton, the pastor of the Baptist church at Medina. Both couples have a large circle of friends and acquaintances who extend to them congratulations upon this rare occasion.

The guests were Mr. and Mrs. A.V. Foster, Hon. and Mrs. Horton C. Rorick of Toledo, Mrs. (Dr.) Rorick Bennett and daughter Mrs. George Clark of Detroit, Mrs. and Mrs. Fred Sullivan, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Crane of Fayette, Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Rorick of Wauseon, Mr. and Mrs. M.C. Rorick, Mr. and Mrs. C.M. Rorick, Mr. and Mrs. G.H. Rorick, Mr. and Mrs. J.P. Rorick, Mrs. Amelia Rorick, Mrs. Amy Rorick, Mr. and Mrs. H.E. Spear, Mrs. P.H. Spear and Mr. and Mrs. L.H. Converse.

S.K. Porter and Mary Rorick were residents of Seneca Township at the time of their marriage, both living near Seneca Village. After their marriage, they continued to live on the Porter homestead until recent years, when they retired to Morenci. Mr. Porter was Vice President of the First National Bank until recently when he resigned that he might be free from the duties imposed by the position.

Estell Rorick and Mary Acker were residents of Morenci at the time of their marriage. Later, Mr. Rorick took his medical courses at the U. of M. He practiced at Tedrow and then located at Fayette, which pace has been his home except for a short period of years when he resided in Columbus, OH.

The warmth of their genial presence in the community where they reside has left ever a wholesome atmosphere of cheer.

Dr. Rorick in his profession during the past years had been able to enter the hearts of many homes and to have part in the deepest things of many lives. He has time and again given material aid in a silent and inauspicious way to those who will never forget. Generosity pure and simple is an attribute not amiss for Dr. and Mrs. Rorick

When Fayette was struggling in the its steps of progress support was always coming from the Rorick home. Perhaps there is no better way to describe the attitude of these people toward the community than in the words of the poet, “Write me as one who loves his fellow men,” and as a seeming reward for such helpful living, youthful mind and heart have remained with both, and this through half a century. It is not for us to estimate the value of such a home.

Source:  Lundahl, Helen Rorick.  (n.d.) The Rorick Family in America.  (NB:  This manuscript is held in the Toledo-Lucas County Library and contains a number of transcriptions of undated newspaper clippings).

A Sad Death

Mrs. F.E. Bryant Taken From Loved Ones

One of the saddest deaths we have been called upon to record was that of Mrs. Frank E. Bryant of Seneca, who was called from her beloved family last Monday afternoon. Expressions of regret at the death of beautiful and useful life in the prime of womanhood were heard everywhere in the community. She had been ill only two weeks and her condition was not considered serious until a few days before her demise. Sad indeed was the taking away to the loving husband and children who still need the care and devotion of a mother’s heart. To her father, Jacob Rorick, and her grandmother, Mrs. Caroline Sayres, who is still young at the advanced age of 91, the loss of her companionship is a sad affliction. In fact, all her many friends and relatives mourn her early departure.

Kate B. Rorick, daughter of Jacob and Mary Rorick, was born in Canandaigua, Mich., January 9, 1872, and at the time of her death, October 24, 1910, was aged 38 years, 9 months, and 15 days. She was united in marriage to Frank E. Bryant September 7, 1893, and to this union were born five children, two sons, John and Jacob, dying in early childhood. The three surviving children are Mary L., Florence S., and Gerald, ranging in age from 12 to 16 years. During her life, she was a devoted daughter, wife and mother.

Besides the mourning husband, children, father and grandmother, the latter two in later years making their home with her, she leaves one brother, William R. Rorick of Buffalo, and two sisters: Mrs. Mel McCloe of Detroit and Mrs. Carl Guss of Medina, besides a host of friends and relatives.

The funeral, which was one of the largest in attendance the county has seen in recent years, was held on Wednesday afternoon, Rev. Henry Coates officiating. Appropriate songs were rendered by Miss Susan Furman and Mrs. Ed. Moore, with Miss Flossie Allen accompanist. The bearers were composed of relatives and near friends, who tenderly carried the remains to their last resting place. The floral tributes were beautiful and numerous and attested the loving esteem in which the departed was held.

Among those attending from a distance were Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Rorick of Buffalo, N.Y.; Dr. and Mrs. E.H. Rorick and daughter, Mrs. Fred Sullivan, and Mrs. G.H. Crane of Fayette; Mr. and Mrs. Mel McCloe and daughter, Mertie, and Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Sloan of Detroit; Mrs. Hervey Spencer and Mrs. Howland of Birmingham, Mich.; Mr. and Mrs. W.C. McConnell, Mr. and Mrs. Clark E. Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs. Chas Ream and Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Vedder of Adrian; Mr. and Mrs. John Rorick and Mr. and Mrs. Will Gorsuch of Wauseon.

Source: Undated newspaper clipping in the possession of Mike Meister.

Hannah Breese Rorick

One by one the pioneers who prepared the way for the religious and material prosperity of our state are passing from our midst. We do well to pause in our rapid life and look back upon the times and conditions out of which they brought law, order, and prosperity from the primitive forest and savage conditions.

Mrs. Hannah Rorick, born in 1819 in Chemung County, N.Y., was married to Deacon Estell Rorick in 1836. They came to Lenawee County in 1837 and settled in the wild unbroken country and worked out for themselves and their children character and material prosperity worthy of all founders of our state. Early in her married life, joining the visible Church of God, she was for nearly 60 years a member of the Baptist Church. First in all good work for Church and State, earnest, careful for essential things of both religion and government, but liberal to all the differing views.

Their home was open for other denominations as well as their own. Their open hand was ready for the cause of Christ by whomsoever represented. In the fullness of years, God has called her to himself and to the husband who preceded her 16 years ago.

At her funeral, which was conducted by her pastor, Rev. J. McLean, from the home of her daughter, Mrs. S.K. Porter of Seneca, were gathered her children, Cosper Rorick, Mrs. P.H. Spear, Mrs. Rorick Bennett and Mrs. Porter with their children and grandchildren, a goodly number of strong earnest men and women of two generations who will honor her memory and in her life find an example worthy of their emulation and inspiration to higher living and a check to the temptations which assail them in the battle of life.

Mrs. G.H. Crane and Mrs. A.V. Foster of Toledo are granddaughters of Mrs. Rorick. The Estell Rorick farm is where Herbert Rorick, a great-grandson lives.

Source: The Christian Herald, November 19, 1897.

William M. Armstrong

One of the oldest wholesale grocery establishments in western Pennsylvania and one of the oldest business enterprises of any kind in Sharon is the Armstrong Grocery Company, of which William Marshall Armstrong is president. The Armstrong family has long been established in this region, and its different members have taken a lively part in social and civic affairs.

The Armstrong Grocery Company was incorporated in 1903 by Mr. Armstrong’s grandfather, W.B. Marshall, and his father, W.J. Armstrong. The mother was Etta (Marshall) Armstrong. The business has continued constantly in the hands of the family, being maintained as one of Sharon’s substantial and reliable institutions.

William Marshall Armstrong, present head of the company, was born in 1901 in Sharon, Pennsylvania, and attended school there. Later he attended Mercersburg Academy, in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, and was graduated in 1923 from Yale college, in New Haven, Connecticut. Upon leaving Yale, Mr. Armstrong succeeded his father in the grocery business and is still serving in this capacity, the other officers being C.C. Marshall, son of W.B. Marshall, vice president; W.L. Woodford, treasurer; and C.C. Miller, secretary.

The firm markets its products to retail stores and institutions within a one-hundred-mile radius from Sharon. They handle all staple groceries, fresh and frosted foods and institutional supplies. They have a fleet of six trucks and employ about thirty people. The company warehouse and office of business are situated in Sharon.

In addition to his business activities, William Marshall Armstrong interests himself extensively in community affairs. He is a Republican in politics and a member of the Sharon Chamber of Commerce, the Rotary Club and the Sharon Country club. He serves as a director of the Mercer County Home for Crippled Children, belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and is a trustee of the First Presbyterian Church of Sharon. He is also affiliated with the United Commercial Travelers.

William Marshall Armstrong married, June 20, 1931, in Fayette, Ohio, Amy L. Crane, daughter of George H. and Eva (Rorick) Crane, of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong became the parents of three children: 1. Amy Armstrong, born in 1933. 2. William Armstrong, born in 1936. 3. Alice Armstrong, born in 1938.

Source: Risenman, Joseph Jr. 1943. History of Northwestern Pennsylvania. New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company