Narrow Escape From Gasoline Explosion

While filling a gasoline lamp in the Maccabee hall at Lincoln yesterday morning Lorin Walling of that town was seriously burned about the hands and a fire in the building was narrowly averted. He was filling the lamp without taking it from the wall, and quantity of the gasoline was spilled on the floor, which immediately ignited, spreading a mass of flame on the floor and in the lamp.

Lorin rushed to the door and threw the flaming can of gasoline into the street, and, returning, carried out the lamp. The fire in the building was easily extinguished, but the act caused Mr. Walling to burn his hands and arms severely, and he will be unable to use them for some time. There was a fire in the stove at the time, and the temperature of the room was high, which was probably the cause of the gas igniting.

Source: Portland Daily Journal, July 30, 1904.

Girl Released As Witnesses Fail to Show

Eleanor Walling, 19 years of age, who with Raymond Delano was arrested several weeks ago in connection with the burglary of the Violin Exchange on Regent street, March 27, was released on her own recognizance today and the case continued indefinitely by City Judge Noel S. Pratt, when witnesses for the state failed to appear to testify against here.  Delano, who pleaded guilty to burglary and grand larceny in this case, was recently sentenced to serve and indeterminate term in the state prison.

When the Walling girl’s case was called this morning, Ray S. McCarty, assistant county attorney, found that not a single state witness was in court to help prosecute the case and, upon his motion, the accused was given her liberty.  Before action on McCarty’s motion for a dismissal, Judge Pratt made an effort to get in touch with the state witnesses by telephone.  After waiting for half an hour, Judge Pratt ordered a dismissal entered in the case. 

Source: Salt Lake Telegram, April 23, 1923.

Man Pleads Guilty to Theft of Violins

Raymond Delano pleaded guilty to second degree burglary and grand larceny in City Judge Noel S. Pratt’s court Friday and was bound over to the district court for trial.  Delano was arrested with Eleanor Walling after both were alleged to have broken into the Violin Exchange on Regent street and carried three violins and three violin cases to the total value of $530.  The burglary is alleged to have been committed March 23.  The Walling woman was not in court when her case was called.  She is named jointly in the complaint.

Source: Salt Lake Telegram, April 7, 1923. 

Walling Clan Has Annual Gathering

Lincoln—One of Lincoln’s landmarks, the old J.D. Walling home, was the scene of the annual gathering of the Walling clan. Group singing and conversation occupied the afternoon, after a picnic dinner of the lawn. James Smart, Sr., soloist, sang a group of numbers accompanied by Mrs. James Smart, Jr.

The president, David Newsom of Portland, presided at the meeting. Mrs. Eva Purvine, daughter of Mrs. J.D. Walling, is secretary.

Continue reading “Walling Clan Has Annual Gathering”

MARRIED

On Wednesday, November 6, 1872, at the residence of the bride’s mother in this city, by Dr. E.R. Geary, Mr. Benj. Walling, of Marion county, and Miss Georgia Comley.

Compliments received. The happy pair took the noon train on the same day en route for San Francisco, their future home. May the kindest smiles of fortune wait upon them.

Source: Albany Register, November 8, 1872.

Killed By His Horse

Jesse D. Walling, an old and respected citizen of Polk county, was killed by his horse running over him, on the 9th inst. Following is Statesman’s account:

It appears that we out on the roads, as Supervisor, working a party of men. About three o’clock yesterday afternoon, his saddle horse, a young animal, got loose and started to run along the road. Mr. Walling rain in front to stop him, but the animal dashed straight on, striking him in the face and throwing him back against a log with great force. The back of his struck a knot which penetrated the skull and he never spoke again. He was picked up, breathing, but insensible, and carried home while a physician was hastily summoned, but before Dr. Grubbs, who had been called, reached the place the old gentleman was dead. He was an old settler of Oregon, an enterprising citizen, good neighbor, kind friend, and leaves a large family to mourn his sudden loss. They have the sympathizes of a host of friends, for all remember “Uncle Jesse” as a man of kind words and noble deed. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and no doubt the funeral will be under the auspices of the order.

Source: Albany Register, May 14, 1870.

Untitled (Jesse D. Walling)

Jesse Walling, of Polk county, was last Tuesday killed under the following distressing circumstances, as detailed by the Statesman:

It appears that we out on the roads, as Supervisor, working a party of men. About three o’clock yesterday afternoon, his saddle horse, a young animal, got loose and started to run along the road. Mr. Walling rain in front to stop him, but the animal dashed straight on, striking him in the face and throwing him back against a log with great force. The back of his struck a knot which penetrated the skull and he never spoke again. He was picked up, breathing, but insensible, and carried home while a physician was hastily summoned, but before Dr. Grubbs, who had been called, reached the place the old gentleman was dead. He was an old settler of Oregon, an enterprising citizen, good neighbor, kind friend, and leaves a large family to mourn his sudden loss. They have the sympathizes of a host of friends, for all remember “Uncle Jesse” as a man of kind words and noble deed. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and no doubt the funeral will be under the auspices of the order.

Source: Albany State Rights Democrat, May 13, 1870.

Mere Scratch Causes Death

SALEM, Or., Feb. 23.—As a result of a small scratch upon the knuckle of the forefinger of the left hand, blood poison set in, and Fred Walling, the 16-year old son of Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Walling, who reside near Lincoln, Spring Valley, now lies dead at the home of his parents, and the latter are nearly prostrated with grief over the sad event, for the boy was the pride of the family and, in fact, of the neighborhood.

Source: Portland Oregonian, February 24, 1904.