Short News Items from 1920

Word comes from Spokane that Albert Wallace, formerly of this city, was taken to the hospital Monday for an operation for appendicitis. (Nezperce Herald, February 5, 1920)

Johnnie Wallace writes from Vancouver, Wash., that he is spending his vacation working in the ship yards at that place, and that he will attend the deaf school at Vancouver this winter, taking a course preparatory to attending the national deaf school at Washington, D.C. (Nezperce Herald, August 26, 1920)

Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo Myers, Mr. and Mrs. Scott Rochelle, Mr. Andrew Todd and Mr. Parle Hager and family were entertained to dinner Sunday by Mrs. Phebe Hempstead. (Columbus Sunday Dispatch, December 5, 1920)

Short News Items from 1919

Jas. Burns and Miss Ida Burns returned to their home at Athol Thursday after spending a week at the Chas. Schnell home in this city [Kensington]. (The Athol Record, January 30, 1919)

Of interest to many Athens people will be the following clipping from a Fayette paper with regard to Mrs. E.H. Rorick, wife of Dr. Rorick former superintendent of the Athens State hospital: The many friends of Dr. and Mrs. E.H. Rorick of Fayette, are sending messages of sympathy and encouragement for the recovery of Mrs. Rorick from an attack of paralysis which she suffered Monday. Her friendly greetings, pleasant smile and acts of kindness have won a strong hold on the hearts of the people. She is one the county’s noblest women. The latest reports are very encouraging for her recovery. (Athens Daily Messenger, March 17, 1919)

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Short News Items from 1918

Mrs. Dewey Studebaker has received a letter from her husband in which he announces his safe arrival in France with the American Expeditionary Force.  (Logansport Pharos-Tribune, May 18, 1918)

Mrs. W.C. McConnell of Adrian spent Monday with Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Rorick.  (Fulton County Tribune, May 24, 1918)

Mr. W.R. Rorick and wife of Buffalo, N.Y., were guests of Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Rorick Tuesday and Wednesday.  (Fulton County Tribune, May 24, 1918)

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Short News Items from 1917

Edward Loosley is over from Montague for a few days, visiting G.W. Loosley and other relatives and friends.  He is connected with the Loosley-Lwinnell company over in northern California and says all kinds of prosperity exists over there.  (Ashland Daily Tidings, January 4, 1917)

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Walling, of Portland, are visiting their daughter, Mrs. Leonard Hallinan, this week.  They expect to go to their summer home at Rockaway Beach about May 1st.  They have cottages and tents to rent and will go down to have them ready for their summer grade.  (Oregon City Enterprise, April 27, 1917)

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Short News Items from 1916

A letter from Johnnie Wallace states that he won the championship wrestle at the deaf school on Christmas day. In speaking of the affair he writes: “In the afternoon at 1:30 Ben and I began to wrestle and at 1:55 Ben threw me down. We rested 5 minutes and at 2:00 we started to wrestle again, and at 2:15 I threw Ben down. We rested another 5 minutes and at 2:20 we started on the final. I threw him down quickly and he got hurt and gave up. Another boy has challenged me and I must defend the titles, so I will wrestle him next May. (Nezperce Herald, January 6, 1916)

Mrs. Ben Wiseman departed Tuesday for Sioux Falls for a visit with her brother, Don McGugin, who is studying dentistry there under Dr. Gorman, formerly of Pierre. (Pierre Weekly Free Press, March 2, 1916)

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Short News Items from 1915

John C. Rorick is busy these days enlarging and improving the building west of residence on East Elm street.  (Fulton County Tribune, April 9, 1915)

John Wallace who is attending school at Gooding, Idaho, arrived at home Friday evening and will spend his vacation with the old folks at home.  Johnny has attended this school for ths [sic] last six years, and he has been mimicking the busy bee—improved each shinin’ minute, and has gotted [sic] every bit of good there’s in it.  (Nezperce Herald, June 17, 1915)

Jesse Spiers of Ono attended the dance given by the Harrison Gulch band last Saturday.  (Red Bluff Daily People’s Cause, June 17, 1915)

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Short News Items from 1914

Dr. E.H. Rorick, of Fayette, has been a rather unpleasant experience in a railroad wreck recently; while on his way on a business trip into Texas on Tuesday, February 3rd, the Wabash train on which he was a passenger, ran into the rear end of a Chicago & Alton train near St. Louis, Mo. Dr. Rorick was badly shaken up but not serious accidents are reported. The doctor was able to continue his journey to Tyler, Texas, and returned to his home in Fayette last Sunday noon. (Fayette County Tribune, February 13, 1914)

Friday evening, March 27th, the eighth grade were the guests of Miss Helen Rorick at her home on the ocean front. In spite of the rain a merry crowd gathered and made the house ring with fun and laughter as they played the old fashioned games, “Spin the Pan” and “Fruit Basket.” The Virginia Reel though new to many of the company was voted quite a success. Dainty refreshments were served. The party dispersed hoping “for another one soon.” (Oceanside Blade, April 4, 1914)

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Short News Items from 1912

Marion Sutton is with his sister in Detroit in the grip of his old enemy, rheumatism. (Oxford Leader, March 8, 1912)

Mrs. Winnie Fischer, nee Winnie Palmer, of Grayling was called here this week by the severe illness of her brother, Veryl. She was accompanied by her husband. (Clare Sentinel, March 29, 1912)

Mr. George Walling, of Clackamas County, has been troubled recently with thieves. The first was a large panther, which visited his farm on Saturday night and began to make sad havoc among a flock of fine sheep. The varmint was soon killed by Mr. W. and by this time we suppose it has a place in Buchtel & Cardwell’s cabinet of curiosities. The next thief was a two-legged one, who entered the house and appropriated several articles of clothing, etc., of not much value, however. Mr. Walling did not succeed in capturing the last-named “varmint.” (Portland Oregonian, April 24, 1912)

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Short News Items from 1911

Mrs. Emma Van Sickle, of Port Jervis, N.Y., is a guest at the Friedman home, on Warren street. (Pittston Gazette, March 29, 1911)

Marion Sutton is attending the state G.A.R. encampment at Ypsi. (Oxford Leader, June 24, 1911)

W.W. Sheplee received a letter Saturday from Dr. Garth of Port Arthur, Texas, in which the doctor states that they have had rain for the past three weeks, and for the past day or two it has rained most of the time. They enjoy the gulf breeze and at no time has the thermometer registered more than 92 in the shade. At Beaumont, which is twenty miles north, it is from five to ten degrees hotter. Mrs. W.C. Tyrrell has gone to California to visit with her daughter, Mrs. David Rorick, and Cap. is on his way to Iowa. We all like Port Arthur. Mr. Garth expects to visit Clarion next March. (Wright County Monitor, July 19, 1911)

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Short News Items from 1908

Mr. and Mrs. John Clemans of Peru came down to Nemaha last Saturday evening, returning Monday afternoon. (Nebraska Advertiser, January 10, 1908)

A recent letter from Superintendent Jas. Watson of the deaf and dumb school at Boise, states that the last time doctors dressed Johnnie Wallace’s left arm they removed a bone splinter ad is their opinion that the same will now heal rapidly. The arm will be placed in a plaster cast which will allow the patient much more freedom of the same. (Nezperce Herald, March 19, 1908)

Mr. and Mrs. Ira Groover, of Pontiac, spent yesterday in Flint today, as the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ross D. Groover, of West First street. (Flint Journal, April 29, 1908)

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