Clarence A. Steves

Clarence A. Steves is a prominent representative of financial interests in San Diego County as president of the First National Bank of Fall Brook. A native son of California, he was born in Los Angeles, his parents being M. A. and Abbie (Aldrich) Steves, the former now deceased, while the latter is a resident of Claremont, this state.

Clarence A. Steves was associated with the First National Bank of Oceanside, California, prior to July, 1926, at which time he purchased and took over the business of the First National Bank of Fall Brook, of which he has been the president and active manager throughout the intervening period of seven years. This thriving institution is one of the few independent banks in San Diego County, serving Fall Brook and vicinity, and has been an important factor in the development and welfare of the community. Aside from his banking activities Mr. Steves owns and operates a fine lemon grove of seventeen acres in Fall Brook. He served as president of the Fall Brook Citrus Association in 1931-2 and is a director of the San Diego County Fruit Exchange. He is also a director of the Oceanside Building & Loan Association of Oceanside, California, and president of the West Fall Brook Grammar School. By hard work and close application, combined with innate business ability, he has gained a gratifying measure of success for one of his years and is deservedly popular and highly esteemed in the community where he resides.

In 1922 Mr. Steves was united in marriage to Miss Ruth Rorick, daughter of David Rorick, an honored pioneer and well known attorney of Oceanside, California. Mrs. Steves is prominent socially and belongs to the Woman’s Club and to the Eastern Star. Mr. and Mrs. Steves are the parents of a son, Clarence A. Steves, Jr., who is five years of age. Fraternally Mr. Steves is affiliated with the Masonic lodge at Fall Brook and with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Oceanside. He is fond of outdoor life, finding pleasurable recreation in riding and hunting.

The following interesting article, written by Mr. Steves, is copied from the Fall Brook Enterprise:

The community of Fall Brook, situated among the foothills of northern San Diego County, easily reached by way of excellent paved highways, offers to the home seeker a fine place in which to live. A long period of years has proven that from a climatic viewpoint San Diego County surpasses most sections of the great commonwealth of California. The soil condition of Fall Brook’s rolling hills is of the best and offers a most fitting home for the successful growing of lemons, avocados, and Valencia oranges. The Fall Brook Public Utility District has for the past ten years supplied water to the town from wells. This supply has been more or less limited and the uncertainty of sufficient water has not been conductive to community growth. Just recently negotiations have been consummated whereby the people of the district will be furnished a safe, certain, and plentiful supply of domestic water. This “new” water is to be pumped from the Santa Margarita River to the district’s present reservoir and assures the community of an adequate water supply that will do a great deal toward bringing home seekers to Fall Brook.

The people of Fall Brook are justly proud of their school system. The Union high school has a Class A rating with the State University and is regarded as the most outstanding rural high school in all California. Transportation for both elementary and secondary pupils is provided for those students living at a distance from the schools.

The Baptist, Christian Science, Church of Christ, Episcopal, Methodist, Seventh Day Adventists and Spiritualist churches all hold services in the community. Fraternal organizations are well represented by the Masonic, Odd Fellow, Eastern Star, Rebekah lodges and chapters and Theosophical Society. The Chamber of Commerce, the University Women’s Club, the Woman’s Club, Garden Club, the Kiwanis Club, the American Legion and Ladies Auxiliary, the Fraternal Club, and the Farm Home Department are active in social, civic and farm enterprises. There is also an active W. C. T. U. in Fall Brook.

The Southern California Telephone and Telegraph Company, the San Diego Consolidated Gas & Electric Company, the Santa Fe Railroad, the Coast Truck Line, and the Pacific Greyhound system furnish Fall Brook’s telephone, electric power and transportation requirements.

From a recreational standpoint Fall Brook is an ideal community and has many advantages. Just twenty miles from Fall Brook by paved highway is Oceanside, where there is a splendid beach. To the lover of the mountainous country there is Palomar Mountain, which is within the boundaries of the Cleveland National Forest and is only twenty-five miles from Fall Brook. Several hot spring resorts are easily reached by good roads within a two hours’ drive.

The present so-called depression with all its unnecessary and superfluous conversation about “terrible times” has left no blot on Fall Brook’s business section, and the situation looks fair to good for the summer and fall of 1932. This in itself speaks well for the community and its people.

New homes and new developments are certain to come to Fall Brook with the coming of the Santa Margarita water. The directors of the Fall Brook Public Utility District have taken the right step, which is a step forward, and which will be proved over a period of years to be the turning point in making Fall Brook an even finer place in which to live.

Source: McGroarty, John Steven. 1933. California of the South, Volume III. Indianapolis, IN: Clarke Publishing.

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More Small Town News from Various Points

Portola, Calif., March 3 — Miss Barbara Loosley and Miss Lola Loosley, who have been residing with their grandmother, Mrs. H.C. Weir, have returned to their home in Beckwourth. (Nevada State Journal, March 4, 1933)

F.M. Loosley, a former merchant of Beckwith but now in the mercantile business in Valley Ford, is here visiting his son and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Loosley. He is exhibiting a bruised lip when he received when his car was forced off the road. His car did not turn over but was wrecked badly enough to be put in the workshop. (Reno Evening Gazette, July 18, 1931)

Robert Mackrell, of Huntington, Indiana, stopped off here Wednesday afternoon to visit friends, being en route to Cleveland. He was accompanied as far as Ashland by J.K. Meachem. (Marion Daily Star, May 28, 1914)

Theo. Mackrell, Erie train despatcher at Newburgh, and daughter, Eva, spent Sunday at H.K. Wood’s. (Middletown Daily Times, February 1, 1894)

FIRE ENDANGERS BARNS: Fire from embers from burning brush carried to straw stacks, but for the assistance of neighbors, would have completely destroyed the large barns on the Porritt Farm, Seymour Lake, Friday the 6th. The water tanks for cattle and a large cistern provided sufficient water. (Clarkston Community News, May 21, 1921)

Mrs. Allen Price, of Penn Yan, was a week-end guest of her father, W.W. Hutchinson, and sister, Miss Dorothy Hutchinson. (Wellsboro Agitator, May 30, 1928)

The many friends of Clifford Rochelle, of Fifth and Heaton streets, will be sorry to learn that he is confined to Ft. Hamilton hospital for treatment. Mr. Rochelle has recently returned from the Good Samaritan hospital, Cincinnati, where he also underwent treatment. (Hamilton Evening Journal, August 21, 1931)

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Rochelle, Mrs. Ida Rochelle, Mrs. Chas. Stegel [sic], and son, George, left yesterday by motor to visit friends and relatives in Sandusky and Columbus. (Hamilton Daily News, August 29, 1924)

Mrs. Theodore C. Search of Maryville, Mo., is here for a visit with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. Werre. (Edwardsville Intelligencer, July 27, 1927)

Miss Minnie Spearin of the Grindstone City school is the guest of her sister, Mrs. Jas. Baldwin. (Bad Axe Democrat, December 30, 1887)

ONE YEAR AGO: The historic Bailey House, near Pilot Hill, has been sold by John B. Wagner to Clarence Steves, formerly of Orange County. (Placerville Mountain Democrat, July 31, 1947)

Mr. and Mrs. Estell Sullivan, of Fayette, former students at Ohio University, were weekend guests of Mrs. Sullivan’s aunt and her husband, Mr. and Mrs. I.D. Quick, Columbia Ave., and Mrs. Sullivan’s brother and family, Mr. and Mrs. John H. Acomb and son John III, Highland Ave. Mr. Acomb was a member of the graduating class at Ohio University Sunday. (Athens Messenger, June 9, 1953)

J.P. Sutton accompanied to Orion the remains of his brother whose death occurred last Sunday night at the residence of his sister Mrs. J.W. Linderman. (Northern Tribune, January 6, 1883)

Mr. and Mrs. Kirk Walling, parents of Mrs. Richard Jones, who have made their home in Silverton for several years, are now occupying a trailer house near their daughter, and family. (Dayton Tribune, September 23, 1971)

Miss Mildred Werre, who attends McKendree at Lebanon, is spending the week-end with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. Werre. (Edwardsville Intelligencer, February 9, 1924)

Dr. and Mrs. Charles Wilkin, of Jeffersonville, Dr. and Mrs. Osmer J. Wilkin and daughter, of Newburgh, Mr. and Mrs. Karle Heinle, of Warwick, Mrs. Louise Van Kan and Miss Harriet Wilkin, of New York, were Sunday guests at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Heinle. (Kingston Daily Freeman, November 3, 1939)

Lawrence Willson, of Bowdoin College, Maine, is visiting his parents Mr. and Mrs. Merritt Willson over Christmas (Wantage Recorder, December 28, 1917)

Funeral for Tyrrell to be Held on Wednesday

Probably at His Home
Venture Capitalist, Jefferson County’s Richest Man Found Dead in Bed Early Sunday

Captain W.C. Tyrrell, 78, who died at his home in Beaumont early Sunday morning, was counted as one of Port Arthur’s staunchest boosters and most active developers. The aged financier was found dead in bed by his son-in-law, Dr. James W. Garth, about 1:15 a.m. Sunday, a heart attack causing his death.

Funeral services for the dead financier probably will be held Wednesday afternoon.

Since Captain Tyrrell located to this section of Texas, first temporarily in the late nineties, and permanently in 1904, he had acquired vast real estate properties in Port Arthur and the adjoining territory, developing all of his buildings here. The four-story Deutser Building, at the corner of Procter avenue and Waco avenue, the Tyrrell Building at the corner of Procter avenue and Fort Worth avenue, occupied by Fuller’s cafe and various offices and lodge halls, the Grammler undertaking establishment, Fifth and Waco, and the Jones-O’Neal furniture building on Fifth street were all built by Captain Tyrrell.

Hotel First Project

The city properties owned and developed by Captain Tyrrell in Port Arthur were financed by the W.C. Tyrrell Trust company, an organization comprising the financier and his four children. The development of Griffing and Port Acres was carried out through the Tyrrell-Combest Co., which he organized in 1918 with Ross Combest, with original capitalization of $70,000, which now has a fully paid capital of $1,000,000. Capt. Tyrrell’s fortune was conservatively estimated at $4,000,000.

During the flood in Port Arthur, Capt. Tyrrell sent over 8,000 loaves of bread into this city to relieve the food shortage here, the loaves being distributed without cost throughout the city. On another occasion, he ordered 100,000 roses sent to Kansas City churches and hospitals. Several years ago he established a park in Belmond, Iowa, his former home, as memorial to his wife, who died August 2, 1919. A park on the Fannett road, near Beaumont, was give to that city by Capt. Tyrrell recently, and is now being developed. Purchase of the First Baptist church building, on Pearl street, Beaumont, as a public library for the city, also was made by Capt. Tyrrell and presented to Beaumont.

Children Surviving

Surviving Capt. Tyrrell are four children: Mrs. Esther L. Garth, of Beaumont, with whom he made his home for a number of years past: Mrs. David Roderick [sic] of Oceanside, California: W.C. Tyrrell, Jr., who now owns and occupies the Tyrrell farm near Belmond, Iowa: and Harry C. Tyrrell, engaged in the oil business, at Tulsa, Oklahoma: 12 grandchildren, Dr. W. Leroy Garth of San Diego, Cal.: C. Tyrrell Garth of Beaumont: J.W. Garth, Jr. of Tulsa, Okla.: Thomas T. Garth of Beaumont: Mrs. Helen Rorick McGill, Mrs. Ruth Rorick Steves, and David Rorick, Jr. of Oceanside, Cal.: Harry F. Tyrrell of Beaumont, and Preston Tyrrell, W.C. Tyrrell III, Miss Carol Tyrrell, and David Tyrrell of Belmond, Iowa, and two great-grandchildren, William and Wilma Harl Garth, children of Dr. Leroy Garth of San Diego, Cal.

Source: Port Arthur News, September 6, 1924.

Birth Announcements

To the wife of Merle Ansberry, September 5, a daughter, Eleanor Allyne, Hanford.  (Oakland Tribune, September 18, 1933)

NEW ARMSTRONG SON:  Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Armstrong are parents of a boy born Monday Jan. 29 at the St. Ann hospital, Algona.  Mrs. Armstrong is the former Dorothy Fish, and the Armstrongs have one other son, Melvin.  Mr. Armstrong works for the Post transfer company at Algona.  The family moved lately from Livermore to the Obrecht home here.  (Kossuth County Advance, February 6, 1951)

Born yesterday to Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Bryant of 924 East Church street a daughter, Marilyn Jeanne.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 29, 1925)

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Chapin of Pontiac, formerly of Lake Orion, are receiving congratulations on the birth of a son, Mark Steven, Tuesday, January 29th, at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Pontiac.  Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Glen McNeil of Lake Orion and Mrs. Margaret Chapin of Pontiac.  (Lake Orion Review, February 1, 1952)

The daughter born at Bethesda hospital to Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Chesser of Fultonham has been named Pamela Kay.  Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Asa Brown and Mrs. Helen Newport, all of Crooksville, and great-grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Gage Frash of Crooksville.  (Zanesville Signal, November 25, 1953)

Mr. and Mrs. Tracy E. Decker of Johnson announce the birth of a son, Tracy, Jr., February eleventh.  (Middletown Times-Herald, February 17, 1930)

September 8 — To Mr. and Mrs. Wellington Edmison, 1229 Stillwater street, twin daughters.  (Nebraska State Journal, September 9, 1910)

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Francis are the parents of a son, born Monday June 11.  (Lake Orion Review, June 15, 1945)

Mrs. Dorothy Fritz of Lake Orion and Mrs. Magdalena Friedrich of Pirmansen, Germany, are both grandmothers for the first time, but Mrs. Fritz won’t get to see little Richard Lyle, Jr., for quite a while.  He was born overseas, where his father is stationed with the Army.  The baby was born August 27 and weighed eight pounds, ten ounces.  His parents are Cpl. and Mrs. Richard Lyle Fritz.  (Lake Orion Review, September 8, 1960)

Mr. and Mrs. Marion Hanson of Junction City, a son, at Good Samaritan, Feb. 2.  (Zanesville Times Recorder, February 3, 1960)

Mr. and Mrs. Marion Hanson of Junction City, a son, at Good Samaritan, Jan. 28.  (Zanesville Times Recorder, January 30, 1962)

The son born June 9 to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Henning has been named Joel Augustus.  Grandmothers are Mrs. Rachel Henning of Roseville Route 2 and Mrs. Leone Robison of Roseville.  The couple has a 17-year old son, Kevin.  (Zanesville Times Recorder, June 23, 1972)

Congratulations are being extended to Mr. and Mrs. Ralph C. Hird (Harriett Carol Rorick) who are the parents of a daughter born August 6 in Daytona Beach, Fla.  Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. J.T. Rorick of Portland and Mrs. Dwight Beebe of Englewood, N.J.  (Portland Oregonian, August 8, 1946)

Congratulations are being received by Mr. and Mrs. John B. Jarrell, of Centreville, on the birth of a 6 lb. 8 oz. boy, Francis Henry, at Chestertown Hospital, June 27, 1943.  Mrs. Jarrell was formerly Miss Ruth Doty, of Greensboro.  (Denton Journal, July 9, 1943)

CHILD IN MARGARUM HOME:  Little Janette Robertson Margarum arrived in town at 5 o’clock on Sunday afternoon at the Margarum home on Bank Street, and the household was made very happy.  Mayor Margarum has been receiving congratulations ever since at the Farmers’ Bank and elsewhere.  (Middletown Times-Press, February 9, 1918)

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Margarum of Unionville are parents of twins, a boy and a girl, born at Horton hospital on November nineteenth.  (Middletown Times-Herald, November 23, 1945)

Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Mason, formerly Helen McIntosh, announce the birth of a daughter this morning at their home in South Second street.  Grandfather and grandmother J.S. Mason of Eddy street are wearing smiles that won’t rub off.  (Newark Advocate, August 12, 1915)

MORRIS, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Earl (Inez Jessie Edmison), 360 North Twenty-seventy street, girl, Oct. 2.  (Nebraska State Journal, October 3, 1933)

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Pearson, of Voorheis Lake, announce the birth of a son, William Anthony, June 21, at St. Joseph’s Mercy Hospital, Pontiac. He weighed 7 lbs. 5 ozs. Mrs. Pearson is the former Ruth Alleman. (Lake Orion Review, June 29, 1945)

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Pearson, Jr. (Ruth Alleman) of Oxford, are the parents of a daughter, Ellen Rae, weighing 8 lbs., 9 ozs. She was born Saturday, December 13, at St. Joseph’s Mercy Hospital, Pontiac. (Lake Orion Review, December 19, 1947)

We failed last week to note the advent of a little girl baby at the home of Sid Rorick.  Weight, seven pounds.  Mother and child doing well.  (Oxford Mirror, October 22, 1886)

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Steves of Pilot Hill are the parents of a baby girl born at the Highland Hospital, Auburn, Saturday, April 29.  Mrs. Steves, as Jane Owens, lived here several years ago with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. L.D. Owens.  (Mountain Democrat, May 11, 1950)

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Sutton, 176 West Main Street, Port Jervis, are the parents of a girl born in St. Francis Hospital Saturday.  (Middletown Times-Herald, May 26, 1947)

Born — In this city, January 2, 1894, to Mr. and Mrs. Enos Walling, a daughter.  (Idaho Statesman, January 3, 1894)

Boy to wife of Nelson Walling, 990 East Stark street.  (Portland Oregonian, September 2, 1899)

Funeral for Steves Draws Many Friends, Officials

Masonic Rites were conducted for Clarey A. Steves Jr. on Tuesday morning at the Chapel of the Pine with interment in Westwood Hills Memorial Park.  The funeral was attended by an overflow crowd of friends and public officials.

Steves, 47, served as county tax collector since 1963 and in 1972 was made county treasurer when the two departments were combined.  His body was found early Friday afternoon in his car.  The vehicle had been parked at the Cameron Park home of his longtime friend, deputy tax collector Elvis Ferguson, who was at work.  There was no one at the residence, and a neighbor checked to see why the car was still there after more than two hours and found Steves dead.  The discovery was reported to the Cameron Park fire department at 1:20 p.m.

The sheriff’s department reported that the cause of death was due to a self-inflicted gunshot wound from a small caliber automatic pistol.  There was no suicide note or other explanation of why Steves would have taken his own life.

Steves defeated incumbent tax collector William F. Truscott in 1962, was re-elected after that, and held the position since that date.  When former county treasurer Albert W. Frey retired in 1972, the board of supervisors combined the two offices and Steves took over the duties of treasurer.

Steves was a member of the El Dorado F&AM, El Dorado county chamber of commerce, E Clampus Vitus James Marshall Chapter, Placerville Parlor Native Sons of the Golden West, West Placerville Elks Lodge, past president of the California Tax Collectors association, and California State Treasurers association.

Steve is survived by his widow, Wilma, of Placerville; children, Sue Watson of San Francisco, Jim Steves of Chico, Linda Dittle of Eureka, Susan Dilts and Victoria Bartley, both of Placerville, Jim Farrell of Camino; father, Clarence Steves, Sr., of Oceanside; and two grandchildren.

The family requested remembrances be sent to the Shriners Crippled Children Hospital c/o Chapel of the Pines.

Source:  Placerville Mountain Democrat, July 31, 1975.