Isabel Scott Rorick

Owing to a number of things, the anticipated interview with Isabel Scott (Mrs. Ceilan Herbert) Rorick didn’t take place until many weeks and she and her husband bought Dooley Leaman’s former house and she settled down in it . . . for one thing, as she explained it, she thought she was going to have so much leisure, but everyone assumed she’d be lonesome when her husband had to go to Toledo and she was out virtually every night . . . A day or so before they (he came back for the weekend) closed the house, she took time for a chat in the patio . . . it doesn’t take long (when they’re seen together) to figure how she got her inspiration for her famous creations “Mr. and Mrs. Cugat” . . . a fictional couple that landed her a law suit with the conductor by that name (long since satisfactorily settled) . . . two highly successful books about them . . . a movie and a radio serial . . . The second book was “Outside Eden” . . . The movie “Are Husbands Necessary?” . . . the serial, which she does not write, “My Favorite Husband” . . . Explaining, “I don’t want to squeeze the turnip dry,” Mrs. Rorick says there are no Cugats in the one short story she managed to find time for this winter nor in the new novel that is hazily in the making . . . The Cugats came into being just because she was named Junior League correspondent from Toledo and couldn’t find anyone else to contribute to the League’s magazine . . .

Source: Palm Beach Post, May 8, 1949.

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Well Known Morenci Resident Passes Away

Mark C. Rorick, older son of Cosper and Nancy A. Breese Rorick, was born on a farm in Seneca township, Michigan Dec. 7, 1845 and died Feb. 6, 1922. His brother Leroy W. was born Sept. 14, 1847. He lived with his parents in a log house until the brick house was built in ’68. Cosper Rorick, father of M.C. Rorick, had a small clearing 3-4 mile north of what is now Seneca village, woods being on all sides. Canandaigua was the nearest post office and trading point combined and traveling was accomplished entirely by ox team or by horse back. The nearest church was at Medina, seven miles distant, and this they attended every Sunday morning. It was necessary to make an early start as they drove an ox team and wagon with a board across the wagon box for the little boys.

When about five years of age “Mark” commenced school in the home district 2 1/2 miles way in the Rorick district today. He walked back and forth to school. When the Tufts school house was being built he attended school in a part of the James Lord home, temporarily.

A part of the home farm was deeded for school purposes and the new building was considered adequate for that time. One feature differing from today was the interior arrangement by which the boys and girls sat facing one another. Then he attended school in Canandaigua and later at Medina Academy for one year, where he and his brother boarded themselves.

Adrian was the center of trade for the county at that time and they planned to make the return trip in a day to that point when taking produce, which made a long hard day.

About this time he met the girl of his choice, Mary S. Porter, who was attending Medina Academy. They were married at the parsonage in Medina by Rev. Boyington, Aug. 9, 1868, which was a surprise to their near relatives, as a triple wedding had been under consideration to include Estell H. Rorick and S.K. Porter, who were married the 20th of the same month.

Mr. and Mrs. Rorick lived for one year with his parents in the brick house when they bought 40 acres adjoining on the south and moved into a log house, where they spent one winter and two summers. While the log house was a shelter it would not seem livable to the young folks of today, being of one room with a loft overhead. The windows were stationary and of six small panes.

With great resourcefulness the lack of a clock was overcome by the ingenious device of drawing a line at a certain angle on the doorstep so on a sunny day the young housewife cold tell when to start preparations for dinner. On account of the discomforts of winter the young couple moved back with the parents into the commodious brick house. They sold their forty acres, bought forty of Mr. Rorick’s father and added more to it until there were the 185 acres now owned by John P. Rorick. They remained here until they came to Morenci twenty-seven years ago.

In 1870 the Wabash railroad was built through Seneca and a little village sprang up, including a post office and church. Soon they felt the need of a new church and Mr. Rorick was, with others, successful in soliciting funds for a new building.

Their home was always open to traveling ministers, school masters, singing teachers, or whoever came to the little church for special occasions. It was always a great satisfaction to Mr. Rorick to be able to entertain his friends in his home and to act as host at his bountiful table. His hospitality was unquestioned. Later this church burned to the ground and Mr. Rorick contributed liberally toward a new one, and before this was completed it was struck by lightning and again burned down, to all of which he helped materially.

For many years he was school director and was always interested in anything pertaining to the public good. He was ambitious and unusually strong. He cleared a large amount of land with the ox team. A singular coincidence may be mentioned in that M.C. Rorick and his brother Leroy married sisters, lived in close relationship on adjoining farms and each had a son born on the same day.

The father, Cosper Rorick, died in 1874. To Mr. and Mrs. Rorick were born three children, John Porter, Myrtie, wife of E.N. Baldwin of Fayette, O., and Maude, who died at the age of fourteen.

Mr. Rorick was one of the first dairy farmers in the county, sending his milk to the Horton cheese factory. He took great interest in the county fair, acting as judge for several years, also in the three town Pioneer picnic, which was held annually in a grove near Seneca.

His heart was always with the farmer and his problems, which he solved by himself by hard work, good business judgment and strictest economy. All through his life in Morenci his love remained for the old home on the farm, which though the early years were full of hardship was sacred with the memories of home life.

After coming to Morenci Mr. Rorick entered the retail grocery and meat business, also wool and stock buying. Her purchased at different times more farms which he improved and cultivated.

He joined the Knights of Pythias order as charter member, and has been one of the most loyal, active members to the time of his death.

He had a gift of being able to rise and represent the order, whether at home or in the lodge room of a neighboring town, in a very pleasing manner. His mother’s death occurred in 1912 and the brother Leroy in 1917. The brothers loved each other with a deep loyalty, in fact love of family was a strong characteristic of the deceased.

For many years the Rorick family reunion was an annual event of importance and his home was always ready for the gathering if needed. Mr. and Mrs. Rorick celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary some three years ago. One of the greatest problems before the American people today would be solved if the example of their home life could be more closely imitated. The question comes to one’s mind, with their advantages of education and means, the younger men and women of today will take up the work of the passing generation and apply to it the same amount of ambition and courage. If so what wonderful things may be accomplished.

There remain thirteen grandchildren who have a splendid heritage of honesty, thrift, integrity, loyalty and ambition. Mr. Rorick was strong in the principles he believed to be right, a strong advocate of temperance, staunch member of the Democratic party, always interested in matters of public interest with careful, prompt attention to detail of the management of his farms, which would mean success in any business enterprise. He possessed an unusually social nature and many friends will miss his face at the window, as he would wave a friendly hand to passersby and welcome calls from his physician and friends.

The grandchildren even to the youngest, will never forget the welcome always awaiting them at grandfather’s home.

In the passing of Mr. Rorick the last of the double cousins to bear the Rorick name, descendants of the three Rorick brothers who married three Breese sisters, has gone. But the closing of a well ordered and well spent life bears out the prophecy of Job,

Thou shalt come to thy grave in a full age,
like a shock of corn cometh in his season.

The funeral service was held at 2 o’clock, Wednesday, at the home on Main Street and was conducted by Rev. H.A. Manahn and Judge B.L. Hart. The remains were laid to rest in Oak Grove Cemetery. The pall bearers were John Poucher, C.F. Buck, Oliver Onweller, A.A. Kennedy, Ed. Gallup and Tom Snow.

Those from out of town who were in attendance at the funeral were E.N. Baldwin of Fayette, Mrs. W.D. Murphy of Columbus, John Cole of Weston, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Crane, John Rorick and F.T. Sullivan of Fayette, A.V. Foster of Toledo, Mr. and Mrs. George Horton of Fruit Ridge, E.B. Root of Adrian, Judge and Mrs. B.L. Hart of Adrian, Melvin McCloe of Detroit, Mr. and Mrs. James Scott and Mrs. Carl Guss of Medina, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Porter of Weston and Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Moore of Canandaigua.

Source:  Lundahl, Helen Rorick.  (n.d.) The Rorick Family in America.  (NB: This manuscript is held in the Toledo-Lucas County Library and contains a number of transcriptions of undated newspaper clippings.)

John Rorick, Former Legislator, Farmer and Banker, Dies

Named as Original Member of Road Commission in Lenawee in 1919

Services are Sunday

John P. Rorick, prominent in business, farming and civic affairs during his life-long residence in Lenawee County, the last 31 years of which were spent in Adrian, died Thursday afternoon. He had been in poor health since May when a serious operation was performed upon him in Cleveland. Since then he has been confined to his home at 403 Toledo Street from where he was taken to the Emma L. Bixby hospital Monday afternoon when his condition took a suddenly critical turn. He would have observed his 79th birthday anniversary December 31.

Mr. Rorick was born on a farm in Seneca township, the son of the late Mark C. and Mary Rorick. He attended school (rural) there and later the Fayette Normal School at Fayette, Ohio. When he was 18 years old he began working in a private bank in Morenci. He was engaged in the banking business for the next ten years, being one of the organizers and cashier of the First National Bank of Morenci, the first national bank to be chartered in Lenawee County. He married Miss Bertha Green of Morenci Nov. 25, 1897.

He served in the bank until 1909 and then became interested in the organization of telephone companies and the building of exchanges, establishing several of them in towns in Ohio and Indiana. But farming remained an interest also. He moved from Morenci back to his home farm, gradually expanding his land holdings and farming operations in his home township and into Fulton County, Ohio.

During his residence in Morenci, he had served on the village council and also on the school board. In 1919 when the Lenawee County Board of Road Commissioners was established he was elected one of the three original commissioners. His road commission work took him to Adrian and he moved his family there in 1922. After six years on the road commission he ran for election to the state legislature from the district that included the Southern half of Lenawee County. During his two terms in the legislature, he served on the roads and bridges committee, the committee on public utilities and the committee on state penal institutions. When the legislature was redistricted Mr. Rorick retired from politics.

Since then his major interest has been supervision of his farm operations. He has been a member of the Adrian lodge of the Elks the last 30 years and a trustee for much of that time.

Mrs. Rorick died in 1941. Surviving Mr. Rorick are four daughters and two sons: Mrs. Harry Lundahl and Mrs. Russell Raymond of Adrian, Mrs. Prosser Watts of Huntington, Ind., Mrs. J. Clayton Scott of Defiance, Ohio, John Rorick, Jr. of Seneca and Alan G. Rorick of Brecksville, Ohio. He also leaves 16 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. A sister, Mrs. Earl N. Baldwin, resides in Howell and St. Petersburg, Florida.

Source:  Lundahl, Helen Rorick.  (n.d.) The Rorick Family in America.  (NB: This manuscript is held in the Toledo-Lucas County Library and contains a number of transcriptions of undated newspaper clippings.)

Will and Probate Documents for Jerome B. Walling

 

In the Name of the Benevolent Father of all, I, Jerome B. Walling of Boise City, County of Ada, State of Idaho, being of sound and disposing mind do publish and hereby declare this my last Will and Testament as follows:

First: I direct that my funeral be held with proper regard to my station in life and the circumstances of my estate.

Second: I direct that executor hereinafter named, as soon as there shall be sufficient funds in his hands, shall pay the funeral expenses and the expenses of my last sickness.

Third: I give and bequeath to my grand-daughter, Getrude Walling Scott, daughter of my son, Inman, deceased, the sum of five hundred ($500) dollars which shall be taken and delivered in full from her full share; and that of any children of said Inman Walling.

Fourth: I direct that, as the children of my daughter, Mary Walling Jackson, deceased, have been provided for in my lifetime, it is my will that nothing be given to said children or the heirs of said Mary Walling Jackson.

Fifth: I give and bequeath to Lucy Walling Loosley, my daughter, the bed and bedding now used by me in the house of my son Enos where I now reside.

Sixth: I hereby declared [sic] the following amounts to be deemed advancements to the several persons hereinafter named, being my sons and daughters, which sums I have advanced to said persons, at various times; and that no other sums whatsoever are to be taken or deemed as advancements unless the same shall be given in advance by me to them or either of [illegible] after the date of this will; and said sums shall be taken and deemed in full settlement of all claims of mine or my estate against said persons up to the date of this will, to wit: My son Jeptha, two hundred and twenty-five ($225) dollars; my daughter Rosalie Walling Gile, three hundred ($300) dollars; my daughter, Caroline Walling Mullany, one hundred ($100) dollars; my son, Nelson Walling, seven ($700) hundred dollars; My son, Enos C. Walling, one thousand ($1000) dollars, and said sums shall not bear interest or any interest to be added thereto.

Seventh: It is my will and I so direct that after the payment of my just debts, expenses of administration, and the payment of the above bequest of five hundred ($500) dollars that the rest, residue, and remainder of all my estate both real, personal, and mixed of every name and nature whatsoever including for the purposes of computation the amounts herein declared to be advancements and any hereafter made, shall be divided into eight (8) equal shares, one of which shares, after deducting from the amount thereof the sum charged against each as advancements, I give and bequeath to each of my sons and daughters now being to wit Jeptha, Lucy Loosley, Rosalie Gile, Caroline Mullany, Jerome, Nelson, and Enos, and the remaining one-eighth share I give and bequeath to my hereinafter named executor in trust for my son Fletcher.

Eighth: I direct that my hereinafter named executor shall represent my son Fletcher in all matters that may arise out of the settlement of my estate and the portion hereby bequeathed to my said son and that he shall retain the care, control, and custody of the said share by notice of this my will until my said son Fletcher shall become capable of the management of his own person and estate without the need of a guardian or committee or until his death; and my executor is hereby authorized and empowered to reduced said portion to money and invest the same in any manner he may deem for the best interest of my said son and his share of my estate. Should my son become capable of the management of his own estate and person, then it is my will and I direct that my executor shall on due proofs of the same at once turn over and pay to my said son Fletcher the portion of my estate herein bequeathed to him; and should my said son Fletcher died before becoming capable of the management of his own person and estate or before his portion has been turned over and paid to him, then it is my will and I direct that my said executor shall divide the said portion herein bequeathed to my said son Fletcher between my seven sons and daughters now living and named in paragraph seven herein, share and share alike.

Ninth: It is my will and I direct that my executor shall continue to administer my estate until the debts due to me or to my estate shall become due according to the terms thereof unless sooner paid; and that until the portion of my estate herein bequeathed to my executor in trust for my said son Fletcher has been distributed as herein before provided; unless my said executor should deem it to be for the best interest of my estate that the sums be sooner settle, and in apportioning the respective shares herein bequeathed except for the specific bequest of five hundred ($500) dollars, my executor may reduce all of the estate to money and make divisions of same; or he may make partitions of the real estate and personal property without so reducing them to money as he may deem best.

Tenth: I hereby nominate and appoint Harry C. Nyman of Boise City, Ada County and State of Idaho, the executor of this my last will and testament and hereby I do revoke all and any former wills by me at any time made.

In witness whereof I have [illegible] to set my hand and seal this 21st day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eighteen hundred and ninety three.

Jerome B. Walling

[Witnessed] David D.W. Edwards, Residence, Fort Springs Avenue, Boise City, Idaho
[Witnessed] Lewis L. Bonners, Residence, Cor. 10th and Idaho Sts., Boise City, Idaho

Source:  Ada County Probate File B-398.

Isabel Scott Rorick

Isabel Scott Rorick  was married to Ceilan H. Rorick (son of Horton C. Rorick, whose History of the Rorick Family appears elsewhere on this site).

She was the best-selling author of two books in the 1940s: Mr. and Mrs. Cugat and Outside Eden. Both books are collections of humorous short stories about married life, with the principal characters been George and Liz Cugat. George is a banker, and Liz is the young woman who has finally snared the most eligible bachelor in town. The humor revolves around Liz’s inability to balance her checking account and stay within her budget while trying to help her banker husband advance in his career. In reality, Ceilan Rorick was a banker in the Spitzer-Rorick Trust and Savings Bank of Toledo, and Isabel Scott Rorick was the daughter of one of Toledo’s most prominent families.

Although both books were bestsellers when they were released, today they are remembered largely as a footnote in television history. They were first turned into a movie in 1942, Are Husbands Necessary?, starring Ray Milland. (In one collection of reviews of movies on videotape, it’s summarized as “Was this film necessary?”) I have yet to find a copy of the film or to see it turn up on television, but would love to see it some day now that I’ve read the books.

They were next turned into a successful radio serial, My Favorite Husband, starring Lucille Ball and Richard Denning, which ran from 1948 to 1951. Supporting players in the cast included Gale Gordon and Bea Benaderet. CBS then became interested in transferring the serial to the new medium of television, and the network was willing to hire the entire cast and creative team. Lucille Ball, however, wanted to cast her husband in the t.v. series. Because Desi Arnaz would not have been believable as a Midwestern banker, the whole premise of the show was radically revised — and I Love Lucy was born.

My Favorite Husband did make it to CBS with a different cast. It ran from 1953 to 1955 and was sponsored by Frigidaire.

Both of Isabel Scott Rorick’s books are easily obtainable from used book sites and eBay. Although dated in some places (some characters never seem to be without a highball in their hands), they are quite entertaining and worth searching out.

© Carol Ann Hilton. Unauthorized use prohibited.

Mrs. H.W. Lundahl, Civic Worker, Dead

Mrs. Helen Rorick Lundahl, wife of Dr. Harry W. Lundahl of 403 Toledo Street, died Monday at 10:00 a.m. in Bixby Hospital, where she had been a patient ten days. Death was the result of a year’s illness caused by a heart condition.

Born in Morenci Sept. 29, 1899, Mrs. Lundahl was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John P. Rorick. She lived with her parents in Morenci nine years, then on the Rorick farm in Seneca township for 13 years and the remainder of her busy life in Adrian. She was a graduate of Morenci High School, attended the University of Michigan and was a graduate of Easter Michigan University. She taught mathematics one year in Morenci High School, the Rorick school for one year and Adrian Junior High School one year.

Mrs. Lundahl was a member of First Presbyterian Church, a past president of the William C. Stark Auxiliary of the American Legion, a past regent of the Lucy Wolcott Barnum Chapter of the [Daughters of] the American Revolution, and state historian of the D.A.R. She was a former chairman of the Adrian Republican Women’s Club and was active in the work of the Red Cross and Associated Charities. Her club affiliations were the Zeta Tau Alpha, national college sorority, and Kappa Kappa Epsilon Sorority of Adrian and the Book Club. Her hobbies were gardening and genealogy.

Her marriage to Dr. Lundahl was an event of Dec. 1, 1923. He survives with two daughters, Mrs. Donald (Mary) Phillips of Martinsville, Va., and Mrs. Robert (Marjorie) Klinger of Tulsa, Okla.; one son, Jack Lundahl of Sand Lake; three sisters, Mrs. Prosser (Marjorie) Watts of Blissfield, Mrs. Russell (Marie) Raymond of Adrian and Mrs. Clayton (Alice) Scott of Defiance; two brothers, John Rorick of Seneca and Alan Rorick of Brecksville, Ohio. Eleven grandchildren also survive.

Source:  Lundahl, Helen Rorick.  (n.d.) The Rorick Family in America.  (NB:  This manuscript is held in the Toledo-Lucas County Library and contains a number of transcriptions of undated newspaper clippings.  Helen Lundahl died May 31, 1965.)

Obituary and Funeral Notice for Bertha Green Rorick

Bertha Green Rorick
Heart Attack Fatal to Mrs. John Rorick
Was Active in Red Cross, Club and Church Activities

Mrs. Bertha Green Rorick, wife of John P. Rorick, a prominent resident of Adrian and Lenawee County, died suddenly Sunday morning in her home at 403 Toledo Street, the result of a heart attack. She had been in her usual good health, working Saturday all day at her Sand Lake cottage, and Sunday morning had made preparations to attend church services as was her custom. She was dressing for church when stricken.

Mrs. Rorick suffered a heart attack a few years ago after an operation, but apparently had recovered and had resumed her many activities in church and club work. When the appeal for workers in Red Cross work was made Mrs. Rorick with her usual generosity began to spend many hours at headquarters and this winter with Mrs. W.B. McKenzie was made co-chairman of the production committee. She was faithful in her duties and worked unceasingly and apparently untiringly at the headquarters.

Mrs. Rorick was born January 2, 1877, in Chesterfield, Ohio, the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. N.T. Green. She graduated from Morenci High School in 1895 and on November 25, 1897, married John Porter Rorick, who survives with six children, Mrs. Harry W. Lundahl of Adrian, Mrs. Prosser M. Watts of Hamilton, N.Y., Mrs. Russell B. Raymond of Bryan, Ohio, Mrs. J. Clayton Scott of Adrian, John Porter Rorick, Jr. of Seneca and Lt. Alan G. Rorick, U.S.A. now stationed at Camp Forest, Tenn. Ten grandchildren, John Rorick, Mary and Marjorie Lundahl, Thomas McKeever and Prosser McKeever Watts, Kathryn, William and Russell Raymond, Jo Anne Scott and Jeanne Rorick also survive.

The Roricks were residents of Morenci for 30 years with the exception of one spent in Chicago during the World’s Fair in 1892-93 [Noted by Helen Rorick Lundahl “this should probably say the Greens”]. They lived in Adrian for 11 years and then went to the Rorick farm in Seneca for a few years, returning to their Adrian home in August 1936 where they have since lived.

Mrs. Rorick when asked what her hobby was on one occasion replied “my children.” Her chief interest was in her home and family, then her church and then her club work.

She was a member of the Presbyterian Church where she was active in all societies and departments. She served as Superintendent of the intermediate department of the Sunday school for ten years, was an officer in the missionary society and other societies and was interested in the general church programs. She was a member of the state Presbyterian board.

She was a descendant of General Nathaniel Green of Revolutionary fame and joined the Wauseon, Ohio Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution in 1912, transferring to the Lucy Woldcott Barnum Chapter in Adrian. She retired as regent of the Adrian Chapter this spring having served for two years.

She was a member of the Adrian Woman’s Club, serving as its president in 1933-34. She was also a member of the Ada C. Mumford Union of the W.C.T.U.

When her children were attending school she was active in Parent-Teacher circles and a few years ago served on the advisory board of the Salvation Army. After retiring as Regent of the Lucy Wolcott Barnum Chapter of the D.A.R., this spring, instead of relaxing, concentrated her time and energy on Red Cross work and when a large quota was received recently by the Lenawee County branch she mapped out a plan to interest the entire county in its completion. Only last week when the chapter was presented with a cutting machine which will greatly lessen the work at headquarters, she was overjoyed and remarked how much hand labor the gift would save.

The funeral service will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock in the home on Toledo Street, with the Rev. George Prentice officiating. The burial will be in the family lot in Oak Grove Cemetery in Morenci.


The funeral services for Mrs. John P. Rorick, whose sudden death occurred Sunday morning in her home 403 Toledo Street, were largely attended yesterday afternoon, the spacious Rorick home being taxed to accommodate the many friends who came to pay their last respects. The Rev. George D. Prentice, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, officiated. The burial was in the family lot in Oak Grove Cemetery in Morenci and the bearers were the two sons and four sons-in-law of the deceased, John P. Rorick, Jr., Lt. Alan G. Rorick, Dr. Harry W. Lundahl, Prosser Watts, Russell Raymond and J. Clayton Scott.

Relatives and friends attended the service from Toledo, Columbus, Cleveland, Pioneer, Fayette, Portsmouth, Archbold and Bryan, Ohio, Ann Arbor, Morenci, Brooklyn, Jackson, Seneca, Royal Oak, Dearborn, Albion, Lansing, Battle Creek, Howell, Wyandotte, Tecumseh, Marquette, and Hudson, Michigan.

Source:  Lundahl, Helen Rorick.  (n.d.) The Rorick Family in America.  (NB:  This manuscript is held in the Toledo-Lucas County Library and contains a number of transcriptions of undated newspaper clippings).

Brief News Items about the Roricks in Michigan

Lieut. and Mrs. Alan G. Rorick arrived last evening from Hot Springs, Ark., to spend the next ten days with his father John P. Rorick and other relatives in the city. Lieut. and Mrs. Rorick were met in Toledo last evening by his sisters Mrs. H.W. Lundahl, Mrs. J. Clayton Scott and Mrs. Russell Raymond of Bryan, Ohio. (Adrian Daily Telegram, December 15, 1942)

Lt. Alan G. Rorick has been released from the government hospital at Hot Springs, Ark., where he has been a patient for nearly two years after an illness of infantile paralysis. He is being sent to the United States Military Academy at West Point as an instructor in mathematics. He and Mrs. Rorick are spending a few days with his father John P. Rorick and after a visit with her parents in Cleveland they will go to West Point where he reports for duty June 20. (Adrian Daily Telegram, June 2, 1943)

FORTY YEARS AGO (1909): The play, Queens and a Kingdom, given at the M.E. church last Friday evening by the Epworth League under the direction of Mrs. Leonard Schnorr, was a great success. The characters in the play were represented by twenty-eight girls, each in costume. Miss Claribel Rorick, of Detroit, a little girl of about ten years, gave several numbers and was encored again and again, bringing down the house with her selections. (Lake Orion Review, October 7, 1949)

The family of Mrs. C.H. Rorick celebrated her birthday anniversary Sunday with a dinner at the cottage of Mrs. G.H. Rorick at Wamplers Lake. Other members present included Mrs. A.N. Brewer of Ann Arbor, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Ranger, C.H. Rorick, Jr. and Mrs. Margaret Hixson. (Adrian Daily Telegram, August 16, 1943)

C.M. Rorick left Saturday for California where he will spend several weeks visiting his sons George Rorick and Mr. and Mrs. Max Rorick and family in Pasadena. (Adrian Daily Telegram, April 3, 1943)

Seneca — Relatives here received word that Curtis Rorick suffered a severe heart attack at Curtis, MIch. Mr. and Mrs. Rorick had been spending a vacation at their cottage near Curtis. (Adrian Daily Telegram, October 19, 1943)

Adrian, May 15. – Josie Boyant [sic] attempted suicide at the home of G.H. Rorick, in Seneca. She accompanied Mrs. Rorick to a social Saturday evening and seemed in good spirits. They returned home about 10 o’clock and soon after Mrs. Rorick heard her in the kitchen, groaning as if in pain. Hastening to her she found her vomiting, and seemingly in agony. She hurriedly summoned a physician, and it was soon discovered that the girl had taken paris green. Antidotes were administered. The girl was in spasms and great pain all day Sunday. She was very low at last accounts and may not recover. The deed was prompted by disappointment in not having a deep affection for a young man living in the neighborhood returned. (Marshall Statesman, May 18, 1894)

Mrs. Leeila G. Rorick and Mrs. Leone Scott of Lansing will come Friday evening to spend the weekend with Mrs. C.M. Rorick and Mrs. L.A. Kennedy. (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 9, 1942)

Mrs. Leslie G. Rorick has received word from her son Wyman in the U.S. Navy that he is safe in Honolulu. Mrs. Rorick last heard from her son December 6. (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 9, 1942)

Miss Lulu Rorick returned from Buffalo Friday accompanied by her sister, Mrs. Mel McCloe, of Detroit. (Adrian Daily Telegram, December 17, 1903)

M.C. Rorick and H.P. Rorick were in Union City, Ind., the first of the week on business. (Adrian Daily Telegram, December 10, 1901)

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Rorick, formerly of Plainwell, are staying in Morenci with his mother, Mrs. Curtis Rorick, until their new home in Lansing is completed. (Adrian Daily Telegram, March 4, 1960)

Ensign William R. Wilson who has finished the aeronautical course at Jacksonville, Fla., has been transferred to San Francisco.  He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Rorick of this city.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, October 21, 1942)