Short News Items from 1923

Johnnie Wallace, who is attending Gallaudet College at Washington, D.C., writes that he is out of the basket ball playing this season on account of a badly sprained ankle and a broken bone under the arch of his right foot, caused by playing foot ball. (Nezperce Herald, January 18, 1923)

Mrs. William Moore Rorick of Detroit is visiting in the Lucien Mueller home while her daughter, Mrs. Mueller, is in the Decatur and Macon County hospital. (Decatur Herald and Review, March 11, 1923)

Mr. and Mrs. L.J. Sutton, Marion Sutton and Mrs. Ellen Rogers spent Thursday afternoon with their daughter and niece, Mrs. Mattie Brodt. (Oxford Leader, March 23, 1923)

Continue reading “Short News Items from 1923”

Short News Items from 1918

Mrs. Dewey Studebaker has received a letter from her husband in which he announces his safe arrival in France with the American Expeditionary Force.  (Logansport Pharos-Tribune, May 18, 1918)

Mrs. W.C. McConnell of Adrian spent Monday with Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Rorick.  (Fulton County Tribune, May 24, 1918)

Mr. W.R. Rorick and wife of Buffalo, N.Y., were guests of Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Rorick Tuesday and Wednesday.  (Fulton County Tribune, May 24, 1918)

Continue reading Short News Items from 1918

Short News Items from 1913

Mark Pomeroy likes fast driving, but Friday the team went faster than he enjoyed, taking him about two miles at a lively gait. Fortunately, no damage was done. (Twin Falls Times, January 3, 1913)

Ersel Walling departed on Saturday evening’s train for Spokane, Wash. (Lompoc Record, April 4, 1913)

WAYLAND—Mrs. A.J. Mauchmar of Diamondale is here visiting her parents, Dr. and Mrs. E.H. Ryno. (Otsego Union, June 5, 1913)

Herbert Cawley, who has been in the west for the past six months, and who is now located on a ranch in Montana, is visiting his father P.F. Cawley and sister Helen. (Adrian Daily Telegram, October 1, 1913)

Short News Items from 1909

Miss Edythe Myers is spending a week with her uncle, Mr. Scott Rochelle of Black Lick. (Columbus Sunday Dispatch, March 28, 1909)

Charles Palmer cut his hand severely while working at the mill. (Clare Sentinel, May 14, 1909)

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Walling are the guests of Mrs. Fannie Walling in Lodi. (Oakland Tribune, May 26, 1909)

Mr. and Mrs. Emmet Van Sickle, of Port Jervis, N.Y., and Earl Leppert, of Little Falls, N.Y., have been guests at the home of Charles Van Sickle, of Warren street. (Pittston Gazette, June 2, 1909)

Continue reading “Short News Items from 1909”

Short News Items from 1906

The foundation work on the Rorick cottage being built on Pacific street is about complete and the frame will be going up on the first of the week. (Oceanside Blade, April 21, 1906)

A.V. And Earl McCarty returned Tuesday from their trip across Salmon river and report a very pleasant time while away. (Camas Prairie Chronicle, August 3, 1906)

Mrs. Rorick and Anna departed last week for Chicago where Anna will enter the Ziegfeld Musical college. (Anamosa Journal, August 30, 1906)

Continue reading “Short News Items from 1906”

Birth Announcements from the Early 1900s

Born to Mr. and Mrs. George Palmer Saturday, a son. (Clare Sentinel, December 26, 1901)

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Levi Groover at the home of her mother, Mrs. J.R. Plumley, of this village on Monday, a six pound girl. Dr. J.W. Bachelor reports mother and child doing nicely. (Oxford Leader and Globe, July 22, 1904)

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Groover, Saturday, a baby girl. (Oxford Leader and Globe, October 27, 1905)

Relatives received word Saturday of the arrival of the stork at the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Milne, in Wheaton, Ill., a daughter. Congratulations are very much in order. (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 16, 1907)

Continue reading “Birth Announcements from the Early 1900s”

Untitled (Dilla Walling Grubbs)

GRUBBS—At the family home, Selba, California, Saturday, December 5, 1903, at 4 o’clock p.m., Dill [sic] Loraine Walling-Grubb [sic], aged 42 years, 7 months and 25 days, while undergoing a surgical operation.

Deceased was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Walling, of Zena, Polk county, and was born April 12, 1861. She was a member of the Methodist church and a devoted Christian. In 1886 she was united in marriage to L.B. Grubbs, formerly of Polk county. Besides a bereaved husband she leaves one son, Harold. She was a sister of Mrs. S.S. Gimble, of this city; Mrs. O.S. Pomeroy, of Woodburn; Mrs. F.W. Peaslee, of Zena; John, Jesse and Grant Walling of Lincoln, Polk county; B.F. Walling of Nampa, Idaho; Mrs. Olive Morris, Seattle, Washington; Mrs. Stella Johnson, Mrs. Pheba [sic] McGrew, Jennie Glandon, of Portland, and Mrs. W.M. Toner, of Yaquina, Oregon. She has a host of friends who will mourn her demise very deeply.

Source: Oregon Statesman, December 11, 1903.

Visitor From Oregon.

Says He will Come Back to His Twin Falls County Land.

O.S. Pomeroy, who resides at Woodburne [sic], Ore., was calling on pioneers of the Twin Falls tract this week, and saying that he intends returning here to reside in the near future.

“I was one of the first settlers on this tract,” he explained, “and in fact secured No. 17 in the original drawing. I made my selection near Kimberly, and have come here now to see it has prospered. I find all over the tract are convincing arguments that everybody who has stayed and worked has prospered, and the development and growth exceeded anything I have ever seen anywhere.

“There was, during the first year at Kimberly, considerable typhoid fever, and, having a family which I thought a great deal, I decided to move somewhere else.

“We went up into the Northwest, and have done very well there; but I do not believe the opportunities are present anywhere in the states of Washington or Oregon which are present here. My farm near Kimberly is worth considerably more than what it cost me, and I think that next year I shall remove there, provided Mrs. Pomeroy agrees with me that it is best, because I understand that there is no more sickness on the tract since the discovery has been made that good domestic water is being obtained from well. My absolute independence is available through the land I own here, and I am looking for more ground.”

Source: Twin Falls Weekly News, November 26, 1909.

Short News Items from 1961

“Ted” Pomeroy, Middleton, visited his brother, Mark Pomeroy, Hansen, this week and spoke highly of the advantages of raising sweet corn in his area. (Twin Falls Times-News, April 21, 1961)

Mrs. Lloyd Green, her grandchildren Brad and Sharon Baldwin and their father Cary Baldwin of Beverly Hills were visitors at Camelback Inn near Phoenix.  (Los Angeles Times, December 11, 1961)

Short News Items from 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Hallinan gave a St. Patricks Day party at their home in Redland Saturday evening. Those present were friends and relatives from Oswego, the Hallinan’s former home. (Oregon City Banner-Courier, March 30, 1922)

Sixteen friends and relatives pleasantly surprised Earl Goodrich last evening at his home 619 Comstock street, the occasion being in honor of his 22nd birthday anniversary. The evening was spent informally and later light refreshments were served. (Adrian Daily Telegram, June 9, 1922)

Miss Gertrude Walling, employed by the Suddon-Christenson lumber company, spent the weekend with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Walling near Salem, returning to Portland Monday. (Salem Capital Journal, July 5, 1922)

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Dougherty returned last week from a visit to their daughter, Mrs. Mark Pomeroy. (Caldwell Tribune, November 10, 1922)

Zelma Bean of the fifth grade wrote a burlesque on “Tom Sawyer,” characterizing herself as Mischievous Tom. J.K. Gill & Co. presented Zelma with the book, “Kathrinka” for producing one of the best writings in the “Magic Wish Contest.” (Oregon Daily Journal, November 26, 1922)

Zelma Bean, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Bean, No. 133 Olympia street, is the smallest child who received a prize in the recent magic wish contest conducted by the J.K. Gill company. The prize, which is a $2 book, was presented to her with the others at the main library on Saturday night. Zelma selected as her subject “Tom Sawyer,” and by the rules of the contest she imagined she was the character and made her wishes accordingly. (Oregon Daily Journal, November 26, 1922)