Short News Items from 1903

Dr. J.W. Garth is expecting to receive a new buggy as a Christmas present, which was sent by Cap. Tyrrell from Beaumont, Texas. Mr. Tyrrell reports heavy rains there and the streets flooded with water. (Wright County Monitor, January 6, 1903)

Mr. and Mrs. Emmett VanSickle and son, of Port Jervis, N.Y., are visiting the former’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.C. VanSickle. For a number of years, Mr. Emmett VanSickle has been a watch inspector for the Erie railroad. (Pittstown Gazette, March 10, 1903)

S.E. Rorick is reshingling and applying fresh paint to house and barn at the Mills. (Anamosa Journal, May 21, 1903)

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Short News Items from 1902

Lute Sutton and wife of Orion were visitors at Andrew McNeil’s the latter part of last week. (Oxford Leader, January 31, 1902)

E.T. and Grace McNeil entertained their cousins from Kingston part of this week. (Oxford Leader, January 31, 1902)

Dr. Martin Rochelle and wife, of Wichita, Kan., is the guest of his brother, Mr. and Mrs. Scott Rochelle. (Columbus Sunday Dispatch, August 24, 1902)

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Sylvester King Porter

Sylvester King Porter, 1931 Marengo avenue, died Sunday, February 3, at the age of 81 years.  Mr. He was a native of Michigan and is survived by his wife, Mrs. Melissa R. Porter, a daughter, Mrs. G.H. Milne of New York City, and a sister, Mrs. Howard [sic] Rorick, Columbus, Ohio.  Funeral services will be held at 2:30 o’clock tomorrow afternoon at the chapel of Turner, Stevens Y Berry, 1000 Fremont avenue.

Source: South Pasadena Foothill Review, February 8, 1929.

S.K. Porter Services to Be Held Saturday

South Pasadena, Feb. 6.—Funeral services are to be held at 2:30 o’clock Saturday at the chapel of Turner, Stevens and Berry for Sylvester King Porter, who died Thursday at his home, 1931 Marengo avenue, South Pasadena.

Mr. Porter was 81 years old and was a native of Michigan.  He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Melissa R. Porter, a daughter, Mrs. G.H. Milne, New York city, and a sister, Mrs. Howard [sic] Rorick, Columbus, O.

Source:  The Pasadena Post, February 6, 1929.

Untitled (Anna Porter Milne)

Friends here have learned of the death of Mrs. George H. Milne which occurred August 21 in the Presbyterian hospital in New York City. Mrs. Milne was born October 1, 1973, in Seneca township and was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S.K. Porter. Mrs. Milne attended the Raisin Valley Seminary and Adrian College. She was married in 1896 to Mr. Milne of Chicago where they lived several years. She leaves her husband who is vice president of the Simmons Bed Manufacturing Company, one daughter Mrs. Charles Stover of Bronxville, N.Y., and her mother Mrs. S.K. Porter who now lives at South Pasadena, Calif.

Source: Adrian Daily Telegram, September 7, 1934.

Obituary

Sylvester King Porter was born in Seneca Township, Lenawee county, Michigan, July 8th., 1847 and died February 3rd., 1929 in South Pasadena, California.

He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. John C. Porter, pioneers of the section in which he was born and where he spent the greater part of his life as a successful farmer.

In 1868 he was married to Miss Melissa Rorick, and the families of Porter and Rorick entered into further matrimonial alliances when his sisters, Miss Mary and Miss Harriet, became the wives of Mr. Mark Rorick and Mr. Roy Rorick respectively. These brothers were cousins of Mrs. S.K. Porter.

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Mrs. Harriet Rorick Entertains

Mrs. Harriet Rorick entertained at dinner Saturday for the pleasure of her guests, Dr. and Mrs. W.D. Murphy of Columbus, O. Places were marked for Mr. and Mrs. S.K. Porter, Dr. Rorick Bennett and Mrs. Georgia Clark of Pasadena, Calif., Mrs. George Milne and daughter, Miss Margaret, of New York City, Mrs. Earl Baldwin, Mrs. George Crane and Mrs. F.L. [sic] Sullivan of Fayette, Mr. and Mrs. J.P. Rorick of Adrian, Mrs. Mary Rorick, Mr. and Mrs. E.E. Spear and daughter, Margaret, Mrs. C.H. Spear, Mr. and Mrs. C.M. Rorick and daughters, Harriet and Jean, Dr. and Mrs. Murphy, and the hostess, Mrs. Rorick.

Source: Morenci Observer, September 11, 1924.

Birth Announcements from the Early 1900s

Born to Mr. and Mrs. George Palmer Saturday, a son. (Clare Sentinel, December 26, 1901)

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Levi Groover at the home of her mother, Mrs. J.R. Plumley, of this village on Monday, a six pound girl. Dr. J.W. Bachelor reports mother and child doing nicely. (Oxford Leader and Globe, July 22, 1904)

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Groover, Saturday, a baby girl. (Oxford Leader and Globe, October 27, 1905)

Relatives received word Saturday of the arrival of the stork at the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Milne, in Wheaton, Ill., a daughter. Congratulations are very much in order. (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 16, 1907)

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Rorick

The reunion of the Rorick family was held Wednesday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. M.C. Rorick in Morenci.  These gatherings have now been held annually for about forty-three years.  One hundred and three relatives and friends enjoyed the visiting gand [sic] dinner incident to this event.  At a short business meeting, Dr. E.H. Rorick was elected president for the coming year.  Mrs. Amelia Rorick, who has served as secretary for the past 15 years, declined re-election and Mrs. G.H. Crane was chosen as her successor.  Mrs. G.H. Rorick was appointed chairman of the committee on arrangements.  Continue reading “Rorick”

Bessie Rorick Bennett & Willard Otis Waters

The marriage of Miss Bessie Rorick Bennett, daughter of Dr. Rorick Bennett, and Mr. Willard Otis Waters, of Washington, D.C., which took place at the bride’s home Tuesday evening, was celebrated in the presence of a large gathering of relatives and friends. An improvised altar was arranged in the north end of the parlor under a canopy of southern smilax and northern pine and throughout the house there was an artistic blending of Christmas colors—rich green and bright red.

As the Lohengrin bridal chorus was played, the bride with her mother and attendants entered the parlors. Miss Dorothy Spears [sic] and Mr. Kenneth Spears [sic] carried the satin guest ribbons, the little Misses Sarah Lambert, Alice Louise Porter, Eva Hamilton and Evelyn Keys acted as flower girls. Miss Margaret Louise Milen [sic] of Chicago assisted as ring bearer. Mr. William Hamilton attended the groom as best man and the ushers were Mr. John Willis and Mr. E. Birtsch.

The bride looked very attractive in an exquisite gown of embroidered Lusl-cloth over white satin trimmed with pearls and rare family lace. She carried a bouquet of lilies of the valley. The mother of the bride wore a gown of pearl grey satin veiled with chiffon and trimmed with violet velvet and [unclear] steel heads. The young girls of the bridal party wore white mull gowns with sashes of pink and carried bouquets of pink rosebuds. Mr. and Mrs. Waters left for a short trip and will then proceed to Washington, their future home.

Source: Detroit Free Press, December 31, 1911.