Short News Items from 1916

A letter from Johnnie Wallace states that he won the championship wrestle at the deaf school on Christmas day. In speaking of the affair he writes: “In the afternoon at 1:30 Ben and I began to wrestle and at 1:55 Ben threw me down. We rested 5 minutes and at 2:00 we started to wrestle again, and at 2:15 I threw Ben down. We rested another 5 minutes and at 2:20 we started on the final. I threw him down quickly and he got hurt and gave up. Another boy has challenged me and I must defend the titles, so I will wrestle him next May. (Nezperce Herald, January 6, 1916)

Mrs. Ben Wiseman departed Tuesday for Sioux Falls for a visit with her brother, Don McGugin, who is studying dentistry there under Dr. Gorman, formerly of Pierre. (Pierre Weekly Free Press, March 2, 1916)

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Short News Items from 1915

John C. Rorick is busy these days enlarging and improving the building west of residence on East Elm street.  (Fulton County Tribune, April 9, 1915)

John Wallace who is attending school at Gooding, Idaho, arrived at home Friday evening and will spend his vacation with the old folks at home.  Johnny has attended this school for ths [sic] last six years, and he has been mimicking the busy bee—improved each shinin’ minute, and has gotted [sic] every bit of good there’s in it.  (Nezperce Herald, June 17, 1915)

Jesse Spiers of Ono attended the dance given by the Harrison Gulch band last Saturday.  (Red Bluff Daily People’s Cause, June 17, 1915)

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Short News Items from 1911

Mrs. Emma Van Sickle, of Port Jervis, N.Y., is a guest at the Friedman home, on Warren street. (Pittston Gazette, March 29, 1911)

Marion Sutton is attending the state G.A.R. encampment at Ypsi. (Oxford Leader, June 24, 1911)

W.W. Sheplee received a letter Saturday from Dr. Garth of Port Arthur, Texas, in which the doctor states that they have had rain for the past three weeks, and for the past day or two it has rained most of the time. They enjoy the gulf breeze and at no time has the thermometer registered more than 92 in the shade. At Beaumont, which is twenty miles north, it is from five to ten degrees hotter. Mrs. W.C. Tyrrell has gone to California to visit with her daughter, Mrs. David Rorick, and Cap. is on his way to Iowa. We all like Port Arthur. Mr. Garth expects to visit Clarion next March. (Wright County Monitor, July 19, 1911)

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Short News Items from 1910

While sewing potato sacks Fred Beardslee ran the needle in his first finger. Blood poisoning followed ten days later and Beardslee is now nursing a very painful hand. (Oxford Leader, March 25, 1910)

Mrs. E.H. Rorick left Tuesday morning for her home in The Dalles. (Condon Globe, April 22, 1910)

Orley Tilley attended band practice at Kimberly this week. (Twin Falls Times, April 28, 1910)

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Short News Items from 1909

Miss Edythe Myers is spending a week with her uncle, Mr. Scott Rochelle of Black Lick. (Columbus Sunday Dispatch, March 28, 1909)

Charles Palmer cut his hand severely while working at the mill. (Clare Sentinel, May 14, 1909)

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Walling are the guests of Mrs. Fannie Walling in Lodi. (Oakland Tribune, May 26, 1909)

Mr. and Mrs. Emmet Van Sickle, of Port Jervis, N.Y., and Earl Leppert, of Little Falls, N.Y., have been guests at the home of Charles Van Sickle, of Warren street. (Pittston Gazette, June 2, 1909)

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Short News Items from 1904

J.L. Shanger [sic] was off duty Wednesday.  (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 23, 1904)

John L. Gallup of Lakeside made us a pleasant call Tuesday.  Mr. Gallup had a partial stroke of paralysis some time ago and was in the hospital here several weeks.  He is only able to get about with difficulty now but we hope his infirmity will leave him soon.  (Huron Journal-World, January 21, 1904)

Mrs. M.J. Rorick departed this morning for Moline where she will enter a Sanitarium and receive treatment. She has been quite sick for some time, and her many friends hope she will be great benefitted. (Oxford Mirror, February 11, 1904)

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A Sad Tragedy

Sunday morning the people of the city were shocked to learn that Frank McGugin had been accidentally shot and killed the night previous in the Cozy restaurant. The facts seem to be as follows: Frank and John Lockhart, a nephew of Hon. J.L. Lockhart, and Dannie Jones, had gone to the restaurant after the show to get a lunch. Frank, who was to meet the train that night and take care of the express, carried in his pocket a 44-calibre revolver his father had provided him with for the protection of the valuables sent by express. In taking off his overcoat the handle of the revolver was exposed in his coat pocket. One of his friends, Lockhart, told him to put it in his overcoat pocket, which was done. Frank helped his friend off with overcoat where the gun had been placed, but in hanging it up the coat slipped and fell to the floor. The hammer of the revolver, which must have rested against a cartridge, struck the floor, setting it off, and the bullet taking an upward course, pierced Frank in the abdomen and ranged through his body coming out at his left shoulder, severing an artery near his heart.

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George W. Walling

George W. Walling, a prominent and highly respected citizen and pioneer of Clackamas county, died at the residence of his oldest son at Oswego, aged 72 years.  Mr. Walling came to Oregon in 1847, and settled on a tract of land two mile from where Oswego is now located, where he resided until a few months ago, when he removed to the residence of his oldest son, Albert.  Mrs. Walling died in 1883 [sic].  They had eight children, one of whom, Jane, died in 1864.  Two daughters are yet living, Mrs. Laura Holcomb, of Amity, Or., and Mrs. Minnie McCubin [sic], of Arlington, O.; and the five sons, Albert, Archie, George, Adam and Harris, are all living at Oswego.  The remains were buried in Oregon City in the Masonic cemetery.

Source:  Portland Oregonian, June 14, 1891.