Wallace I. Hempstead

Wallace I. Hempstead, a meat dealer at the Central market, died Thursday afternoon at his home in Reynoldsburg, from pulmonary tuberculosis, at the age of 53 years. He had been ill for the past year. He is survived by his wife, two sons, L.R. Hempstead of Zanesville and H.T. Hempstead of Reynoldsburg, and two daughters, Mrs. F.C. Perkins of and Mrs. V.G. Eastman of Columbus. He was past master of the Masonic lodge at Reynoldsburg, and the funeral services will be in in charge of the Masons Sunday at 1 p.m. at the Reynoldsburg Presbyterian church. Burial will be made in the Reynoldsburg cemetery by Winegarner & Son.

Source: Columbus Evening Dispatch, January 2, 1914.

Untitled (Lulu Hempstead & Frederick Perkins)

After the marriage of Miss Lulu Maud Hempstead and Mr. Frederick Charles Perkins, which took place at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.I. Hempstead, at Reynoldsburg, Ohio, Wednesday, December 5, a wedding supper was served to the immediate relatives and friends, who were guests. The wedding was a very pretty one.

Promptly at 5 o’clock, the members of the bridal party entered the parlor and were met beneath the bower of smilax and wedding bells by the officiating clergymen, Rev. C.G. Watson, pastor of Hoge Memorial church, this city, and Rev. Mr. Jacobs, pastor of the Reynoldsburg Presbyterian church, where the ceremony was performed, the impressive ring service being used.

Continue reading “Untitled (Lulu Hempstead & Frederick Perkins)”

Untitled (Rochelle-Hanson Reunion)

Last Thursday a large number of relatives and friends gathered early in the morning to spend the day at the Rochelle homestead, about one mile east of Blacklick Station, the occasion being the reunion of the Rochelle-Hanson families, and for the fourth time, two long tables, with the seating capacity of one hundred each, were arranged under canvas on the lawn. At the noon hour dinner was announced by the host and hostess, Mr. and Mrs. Scott Rochelle, and was partaken of by all with a relish, after which Mrs. Eva Burch and Miss Vera Babcock responded with instrumental and violin music. A few remarks were made by Elder McGlade, of Wagrum, Rev. Mr. Lamp, of Jacksontown, Col. David Taylor, of Columbus; song by Daniel Myers, Rev. Dr. Lomp [sic], Mrs. Matt Dubois and Mrs. Eva Burch. The afternoon was well spent and enjoyed by all present. Grandma Rochelle is 94 years old and quite feeble. Among her children present were: William Rochelle of Hamilton; Mrs. Dency Barber, of Albion, Mich.; Dr. Matt Rochelle, of Wichita, Kan; Scott Rochelle, of Blacklick; Mrs. Mary A. Hickman and Mrs. Phebe Hempstead, of Reynoldsburg.

Continue reading “Untitled (Rochelle-Hanson Reunion)”

“Grandma” Rochelle Reaches Her Ninety-Third Birthday

Reynoldsburg, O., July 12.—One of the most delightful events in this vicinity for a long time was a day passed with lovely, old “Grandma” Rochelle, last Wednesday, it being her 93rd birthday. Friends and relatives by the dozens with well filled baskets trooped to the comfortable farm house, one of the landmarks of the community, and the day was given up to quiet enjoyment, the venerable hostess being one of the liveliest of the gay party.

Mrs. Lucinda Search Rochelle was born at Sparta, Sussex county, New Jersey, July 9, 1809, and married John Rochelle, at Morristown, N.J., April 9, 1825. They moved to Black Lick, Franklin county, Ohio, in 1836, and purchased the land, and cleared it, and hewed the logs and erected their own cabin on this farm, where she now lives.

Continue reading ““Grandma” Rochelle Reaches Her Ninety-Third Birthday”

Winfield Scott Rochelle

Throughout his entire life Winfield Scott Rochelle has been connected with agricultural interests in Franklin county. He was born September 25, 1847, on the farm where he now resides. His father, John Rochelle, was a native of Sussex County, New Jersey, born in 1805. There he was reared to manhood and learned the trade of an iron-worker, being employed in the days before the advent of the furnace, when the iron ore was taken from the mines and worked into its various stages from the forge. While still in New Jersey Mr. Rochelle was married, and four of his children were born there. In December, 1836, he came with his family to Ohio and settled on the farm now occupied by our subject, purchasing eighty-one acres of land from a Mr. Mills, who was the original owner of the entry from the government. Later Mr. Rochelle added a tract of one hundred and sixty acres in Mercer county and some time subsequently purchased one hundred and twenty-five acres of land adjoining the home farm. There he resided up to the time of his death, which occurred October 26, 1877. He was a stanch supporter of Republican principles and believed firmly in the party, but never sought office. Although a member of no church, he regularly attended the services of the old school Baptist church, of which his wife had been a member for a half-century.

Mrs. Rochelle bore the maiden name of Lucinda Search, and was born in Sussex county, New Jersey, her parents being Martin and Elizabeth (Rorick) Search. Her father was a native of New Jersey and was an iron-worker by trade, following that pursuit in connection with his son-in-law, John Rochelle. His wife was born in Holland [sic], and both died in Muskingum county, Ohio. Mrs. Search came to this state with John Rochelle in 1836 and took up her abode in the home of her son near Zanesville, while her husband remained in New Jersey and settled up some business affairs and to attend a lawsuit over some property. As the litigation continued over a period of several years he did not become a resident of Ohio until 1869. He lived to the advanced age of ninety-two years, and his wife passed away at the ripe old age of ninety-three. It will thus be seen that longevity is a characteristic of the family, and their daughter, Mrs. Rochelle, is still living, at the advanced age of ninety-two years. She is one of the remarkable women of the county, retaining her mental and physical faculties to a wonderful degree. Through fifty years she has held membership in the Baptist Church, and has been one of its active workers, contributing largely to its support and doing all in her power for its upbuilding and growth. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Rochelle were born twelve children, six of whom are yet still living: Dency, the widow of C.H. Barber of Grand Rapids, MI; Mary A., the wife of Daniel Hickman of Truro township, Franklin county; Martin S., a practicing physician of Wichita, Kansas; Winfield; and Phebe C., the wife of W.I. Hempstead of Reynoldsburg, Ohio.

Winfield Scott Rochelle was reared in his parents’ home until his sixteenth year, when he ran away in order to enlist in the service of his country. He made his way to Columbus, and on the 28th of March, 1864, joined Company C, of the Forty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which was assigned to the Fifteenth Army Corps, commanded by General John A. Logan. With the exception of a few weeks in the hospital in Resaca and Marietta, Georgia, he was continuously with his command until the close of the war, and his loyalty and bravery were equal to that of many a veteran of twice his years. He was mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, on the 27th of July, 1865, after having participated in the following engagements: Resaca, Dallas, Allatoona, New Hope Church, Congaree Creek, Atlanta, Griswoldville, Savannah, Charleston and Columbia.

When the war was over and the country no longer needed his services, Mr. Rochelle returned to his home and resumed the work of the farm. He was the only son at home and his labors proved an important factor in the operation of the fields. On the 4th of February, 1875, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Samarida E. Hanson, a native of Jefferson township, Franklin county, and a daughter of James E. Todd, who was born in Virginia and belonged to one of the early families of this county.

After his father’s death Mr. Rochelle continued the operation of the home farm, and from time to time has purchased the interest of other heirs until he now owns all but a small portion of the place. His fields are under a high state of cultivation, many improvements having been added, and everything about the farm is in a thrifty condition, showing that the owner is a practical and progressive agriculturist. He votes with the Republican party, to which he has given his support since attaining to man’s estate. He is recognized as a leader in local ranks, his opinions carrying weight in party councils. For many years past he has been a delegate to the county and state conventions, and in 1899 he was appointed a member of the country board of election, but resigned that office to become a candidate for the nomination for country infirmary director. He belongs to Reynoldsburg Lodge, No. 350, F. & A. M., and also to Daniel Noe Post, G. A. R. The patriotic spirit which prompted his enlistment in the army in his youth has been manifest throughout his life in the discharge of his duties of citizenship, and in all life’s relations he has enjoyed the confidence and regard of his fellow men.

Source: A Centennial Biographical History of the City of Columbus and Franklin County, Ohio. 1901. Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company.

Surprise Birthday Party

Monday, January 23, was an occasion of pleasant surprise on Mrs. Eliza A. Ayers, widow of W.H. Ayers who died in August of 1887, aged 67 years, 3 months and 16 days, and who was buried in the Cedar Hill cemetery by the G.A.R. Mrs. Ayers has lived in Newark for many years, and Monday she reached the eighty-fifth milestone of her life. She is the mother of nine children and has 27 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Her children planned the event to celebrate in a proper manner and get up a surprise on her which was successfully carried out. At an early hour in the day Mrs. Ayers was greatly surprised when a large number of her relatives came in on her pleasant home, 51 South Fifth street, and took complete possession of the house. After a general greeting and handshaking, and some time spent in social conversation, the next thing in order was dinner, and the strength of the table was tried by a bountiful dinner that had been prepared for the occasion. Mrs. Ayers was presented with a number of useful and handsome presents, and after a season spent in having a good social time, the hour for parting came and all left feeling that they had had a most enjoyable time. Those present were G.W. Todd, Columbus; Lorena Haines, Zanesville; Mary Lucas, Zanesville; Mr. and Mrs. Scott Rochelle, Black Lick; W.R. Ayers, Summit Station; J.F. Hanson, Ralph Hanson, Clara Hanson, Black Lick; Samantha Clouse, Havens Corners; Rebecca Feasel, Rose Hill; Mr. and Mrs. W.I. Hempstead, Reynoldsburg; Mr. and Mrs. Homer Lucas, Zanesville; Mr. and Mrs. Rochelle, Black Lick; Mrs. Sarah Hathaway, Mrs. Anna Strockey and son, Arthur, Miss May Ayers and Miss Ville Bausch, Newark; M.S. Ayers and Mr. Xenophen [McIntosh] and family of Newark. (Newark Advocate, January 24, 1905)