Short News Items from 1922

Winfield Bailey was injured when his horse ran away recently, throwing him out. (Oxford Leader, January 6, 1922)

Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo Myers of Rose Hill were guest of her mother, Mrs. Mary Ann Hickman, Sunday. (Columbus Sunday Dispatch, January 8, 1922)

Word was received here Monday that Dr. E.H. Rorick of Fayette had suffered a stroke of paralysis and was in a critical condition. On Tuesday evening Judge Barber received word that the Doctor could not live more than 36 hours according to physicians. (Fulton County Tribune, January 26, 1922)

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Short News Items from 1921

Mark Rorick of Morenci and Estel [sic] Rorick of The Dalles, Oregon, were guests Saturday of Carl Guss. (Adrian Daily Telegram, May 19, 1921)

Mrs. Leonard Hallinan, who has been visiting with her mother, Mrs. Albert Walling, at Rockaway, stopped over with relatives in Oswego while on the way to her home in Redland. (Oregon Daily Journal, June 25, 1921)

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Short News Items from 1919

Jas. Burns and Miss Ida Burns returned to their home at Athol Thursday after spending a week at the Chas. Schnell home in this city [Kensington]. (The Athol Record, January 30, 1919)

Of interest to many Athens people will be the following clipping from a Fayette paper with regard to Mrs. E.H. Rorick, wife of Dr. Rorick former superintendent of the Athens State hospital: The many friends of Dr. and Mrs. E.H. Rorick of Fayette, are sending messages of sympathy and encouragement for the recovery of Mrs. Rorick from an attack of paralysis which she suffered Monday. Her friendly greetings, pleasant smile and acts of kindness have won a strong hold on the hearts of the people. She is one the county’s noblest women. The latest reports are very encouraging for her recovery. (Athens Daily Messenger, March 17, 1919)

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Short News Items from 1917

Edward Loosley is over from Montague for a few days, visiting G.W. Loosley and other relatives and friends.  He is connected with the Loosley-Lwinnell company over in northern California and says all kinds of prosperity exists over there.  (Ashland Daily Tidings, January 4, 1917)

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Walling, of Portland, are visiting their daughter, Mrs. Leonard Hallinan, this week.  They expect to go to their summer home at Rockaway Beach about May 1st.  They have cottages and tents to rent and will go down to have them ready for their summer grade.  (Oregon City Enterprise, April 27, 1917)

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Short News Items from 1915

John C. Rorick is busy these days enlarging and improving the building west of residence on East Elm street.  (Fulton County Tribune, April 9, 1915)

John Wallace who is attending school at Gooding, Idaho, arrived at home Friday evening and will spend his vacation with the old folks at home.  Johnny has attended this school for ths [sic] last six years, and he has been mimicking the busy bee—improved each shinin’ minute, and has gotted [sic] every bit of good there’s in it.  (Nezperce Herald, June 17, 1915)

Jesse Spiers of Ono attended the dance given by the Harrison Gulch band last Saturday.  (Red Bluff Daily People’s Cause, June 17, 1915)

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Short News Items from 1907

Mrs. Eva Walling Larmer, who has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bird Walling, has returned to her home in Salem. (Polk County Observer, January 18, 1907)

Mr. and Mrs. W.C. Tyrrell of Beaumont, Texas, are in the city to visit their daughter, Mrs. David Rorick. Mrs. Tyrrell expects to stay some weeks while Mr. Tyrrell will go north to Sacramento county where has extensive mining interests. (Oceanside Blade, May 11, 1907)

Mrs. Louis [sic] Sutton and daughter spent Monday evening at Wm. Rogers’. (Oxford Leader, May 19, 1907)

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Business & Professional Notices from the 1940s

Cecil Hallinan, Clackamas Distributing company, Oregon City, wholesaler’s beer and wholesaler’s wine licenses suspended 10 days for financial assistance to retailers. (Salem Statesman Journal, April 19, 1940)

The Waldport theater will reopen Friday evening. Operator of the theater will be S.D. Walling of the Walling circuit in valley cities. (Eugene Guard, March 30 1941)

S.D. Walling has torn off the old porch on the front of the Victory theater and built an addition in place of the porch. (Eugene Guard, September 4, 1944)

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Short News Items from 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Hallinan gave a St. Patricks Day party at their home in Redland Saturday evening. Those present were friends and relatives from Oswego, the Hallinan’s former home. (Oregon City Banner-Courier, March 30, 1922)

Sixteen friends and relatives pleasantly surprised Earl Goodrich last evening at his home 619 Comstock street, the occasion being in honor of his 22nd birthday anniversary. The evening was spent informally and later light refreshments were served. (Adrian Daily Telegram, June 9, 1922)

Miss Gertrude Walling, employed by the Suddon-Christenson lumber company, spent the weekend with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Walling near Salem, returning to Portland Monday. (Salem Capital Journal, July 5, 1922)

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Dougherty returned last week from a visit to their daughter, Mrs. Mark Pomeroy. (Caldwell Tribune, November 10, 1922)

Zelma Bean of the fifth grade wrote a burlesque on “Tom Sawyer,” characterizing herself as Mischievous Tom. J.K. Gill & Co. presented Zelma with the book, “Kathrinka” for producing one of the best writings in the “Magic Wish Contest.” (Oregon Daily Journal, November 26, 1922)

Zelma Bean, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Bean, No. 133 Olympia street, is the smallest child who received a prize in the recent magic wish contest conducted by the J.K. Gill company. The prize, which is a $2 book, was presented to her with the others at the main library on Saturday night. Zelma selected as her subject “Tom Sawyer,” and by the rules of the contest she imagined she was the character and made her wishes accordingly. (Oregon Daily Journal, November 26, 1922)

Short News Items from 1921

John Armstrong, of Rochester, was here on Saturday to attend the funeral of his aunt, Mrs. Lucy Reynolds. (Yates County Chronicle, March 2, 1921)

A.E. Spiers came in from his ranch home in the Igo section and transacted business in the city today. (Red Bluff Daily News, April 15, 1921)

Mrs. Jas. Buchanan, nee Bonice Loosley, of Petaluma, arrived at Beckwith Wednesday to spend a short vacation with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. M.F. Loosley. (Feather River Bulletin, June 23, 1921)

M.F. Loosley returned Tuesday from a business trip to San Francisco and vicinity. (Feather River Bulletin, June 23, 1921)

Mrs. Leonard Hallinan, who has been visiting her mother, Mrs. Albert Walling, at Rockaway, stopped over with relatives in Oswego while on her way to her home in Redland. (Oregon Daily Journal, June 25, 1921)

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Hallinan and son Cecil stopped over with Mr. Hallinan’s mother on their way home from a motor trip to Seattle and Sound cities. (Oregon Daily Journal, September 18, 1921)

Matrimonial News from the Aughts

Miss Frances Walling, daughter of Albert Walling, a prominent nurseryman, living near Oswego, and Leonard Hallinan, of the same place were married at the residence of the bride’s parents on Monday evening last. (Hillsboro Independent, June 22, 1906)

James Glandon and Miss Janette Jacks were married December 20 at 201 Eleventh street, the resident of the pastor of the White Temple. Dr. J. Whitcomb Brougher performed the ceremony. (Oregon Daily Journal, December 23, 1906)

The young people gave Mr. and Mrs. John Clemans a great send-off Thursday afternoon when they took the train for Peru. Their trunks were decorated with such suggestive placards as “Mr. and Mrs. Newlyweds;” “Just Married,” etc. On the groom’s back was pinned a paper informing the public in large letters that “We’re just married, we are.” The young couple were showered with rice until the train pulled out. (Nebraska Advertiser, December 27, 1907)