Short News Items from 1909

Miss Edythe Myers is spending a week with her uncle, Mr. Scott Rochelle of Black Lick. (Columbus Sunday Dispatch, March 28, 1909)

Charles Palmer cut his hand severely while working at the mill. (Clare Sentinel, May 14, 1909)

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Walling are the guests of Mrs. Fannie Walling in Lodi. (Oakland Tribune, May 26, 1909)

Mr. and Mrs. Emmet Van Sickle, of Port Jervis, N.Y., and Earl Leppert, of Little Falls, N.Y., have been guests at the home of Charles Van Sickle, of Warren street. (Pittston Gazette, June 2, 1909)

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John L. Shauger

John L. Shauger, aged 67 years, died this morning at 7:30 o’clock in the home of his stepson, W.J. Isaacson, 226 Ormsby Street, where he has made his home for the last three years. Death resulted after a two week illness with asthma and complications.

Mr. Shauger was born in Canandaigua in 1867. For the last 30 years he has been foreman in the Peerless Fence factory and since the death of his wife three years ago he has made his home with Mr. and Mrs. Isaacson.

He is survived by one daughter Mrs. Earl Goodrich of Pontiac, four stepsons William J. Isaacson, Thomas and John Isaacson of Adrian and George Isaacson of Tecumseh and two sisters Mrs. Will Jones and Mrs. Andrew Wood of Adrian. A number of grandchildren and nieces and nephews also survive.

The funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock in the Isaacson home and the burial will be made in Oakwood cemetery.

Source: Adrian Daily Telegram, March 8, 1935.

Funeral of Mrs. Elizabeth Shauger

The funeral of Mrs. Elizabeth Shauger, who died Saturday, was held Tuesday afternoon in the home of her son, W.J. Shauger [sic] at 226 Ormsby Street with the Rev. R.S. Chalmers officiating. Hymns were sung by Mrs. Charles Burr and Mrs. Roswell Burr. The bearers were George Isaacson, Joseph Isaacson, John Isaacson, Thomas Isaacson, Joseph Isaacson, Jr., and Earl Goodrich. The burial was in Oakwood Cemetery. Friends and relatives attending the services were from Holloway, Tecumseh and Pontiac.

Source: Adrian Daily Telegram, May 18, 1932.

Birth Announcements from the 1920s

Mr. and Mrs. Orlly [sic] Tilley are the parents of a baby girl born at the county hospital. (Twin Falls News, November 19, 1921)

Born, January 2, at Bixby Hospital, to Mr. and Mrs. Earl F. Goodrich of 617 Comstock street, a daughter, Ruth May. (Adrian Daily Telegram, January 3, 1922)

Announcements have been received of the birth of a son to Mr. and Mrs. Mahlon Webster of Corning, Saturday, June 2, named Mahlon Bostwick Webster, Jr. Mahlon is the son of Bert G. Webster of Corning and grandson of the late Mahlon Webster of this place. Congratulations. (Dansville Express, June 15, 1928)

Short News Items from 1925

Mrs. William Rorick of Detroit is the guest of her daughter, Mrs. Lucien Mueller. She came down for the holidays. (Decatur Herald, January 5, 1925)

Miss Dena [sic] Loosley and niece, Jeanie, from Portola, visited relatives here Sunday. (Feather River Bulletin, February 5, 1925)

Little Ila Mae Loosley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harold A. Loosley, is recovering from a light attack of measles. (Feather River Bulletin, February 5, 1925)

Mrs. Harold Loosley is ill with measles at her home here. (Reno Gazette-Journal, February 11, 1925)

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Short News Items from 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Hallinan gave a St. Patricks Day party at their home in Redland Saturday evening. Those present were friends and relatives from Oswego, the Hallinan’s former home. (Oregon City Banner-Courier, March 30, 1922)

Sixteen friends and relatives pleasantly surprised Earl Goodrich last evening at his home 619 Comstock street, the occasion being in honor of his 22nd birthday anniversary. The evening was spent informally and later light refreshments were served. (Adrian Daily Telegram, June 9, 1922)

Miss Gertrude Walling, employed by the Suddon-Christenson lumber company, spent the weekend with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Walling near Salem, returning to Portland Monday. (Salem Capital Journal, July 5, 1922)

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Dougherty returned last week from a visit to their daughter, Mrs. Mark Pomeroy. (Caldwell Tribune, November 10, 1922)

Zelma Bean of the fifth grade wrote a burlesque on “Tom Sawyer,” characterizing herself as Mischievous Tom. J.K. Gill & Co. presented Zelma with the book, “Kathrinka” for producing one of the best writings in the “Magic Wish Contest.” (Oregon Daily Journal, November 26, 1922)

Zelma Bean, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Bean, No. 133 Olympia street, is the smallest child who received a prize in the recent magic wish contest conducted by the J.K. Gill company. The prize, which is a $2 book, was presented to her with the others at the main library on Saturday night. Zelma selected as her subject “Tom Sawyer,” and by the rules of the contest she imagined she was the character and made her wishes accordingly. (Oregon Daily Journal, November 26, 1922)

Neighborhood Quarrel Is Aired In Court

Two Women Acquitted of Assault Charges by Jury.

Family Histories and Line Fence Relations Before Justice; Attorneys Indulge in Tilts.

Mrs. Crete Brockway and Mrs. Florence Crispell were acquitted yesterday in Justice Bennett’s court yesterday of charges of assault and battery made against them and on which they demanded a trial before a jury. The defendants, residents of Comstock street, were arrested January 24, after a neighborhood quarrel in which they engaged with Mrs. John Schauger [sic] and Mrs. Earl Goodrich. Brooms, stove pokers, snow shovels and curtain rods figured prominently in the testimony that was given yesterday and both sides went into some detail into the history of their long drawn-out troubles.

Feeling between Mrs. Schauger and Mrs. Crispell was very cordial when the Crispells and the Brockways moved to the Comstock street neighborhood. According to Mrs. Crispell, Mrs. Schauger was “too friendly, if anything,” and she related how Mrs. Schauger had warned her against associating with a majority of the other women in the block if she wanted to “amount to anything.”

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Two Women Before Court After Neighborhood Fray

Police Called to Quiet Affairs Say Stove Pokers and Snow Shovels Were Used.

After a neighborhood encounter between residents of Comstock street early today which the police were called upon to quiet, Miss Crete Brockway and Mrs. Florence Crispell, both of 612 Comstock street were arraigned in justice court this morning on charges of assault and battery.

The warrants charging the offense were made out respectively by John Schauger [sic] and Earl Goodrich. Miss Brockway is charged with striking and otherwise mistreating Mrs. Elizabeth Schauger [sic] and Mrs. Crispell is charged with striking Mrs. Iva Goodrich. In justice court this morning Mrs. Crispell pleaded not guilty and her trial was set for January 27. Miss Brockway pleaded guilty and was told to appear in justice court on January 27. The bond for each woman was set at $200.

The quarrel, according to the police who were called at 6:30 this morning to quiet it, started from some undetermined cause but it soon grew into “some scrap,” as one of the women expressed it in court. Stove pokers and snow shovels were used to advantage by the women before they could be parted, police say.

Source: Adrian Daily Telegram, January 24, 1920.