Birth Announcements from the Early 1900s

Born to Mr. and Mrs. George Palmer Saturday, a son. (Clare Sentinel, December 26, 1901)

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Levi Groover at the home of her mother, Mrs. J.R. Plumley, of this village on Monday, a six pound girl. Dr. J.W. Bachelor reports mother and child doing nicely. (Oxford Leader and Globe, July 22, 1904)

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Groover, Saturday, a baby girl. (Oxford Leader and Globe, October 27, 1905)

Relatives received word Saturday of the arrival of the stork at the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Milne, in Wheaton, Ill., a daughter. Congratulations are very much in order. (Adrian Daily Telegram, September 16, 1907)

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Short News Items from 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Hallinan gave a St. Patricks Day party at their home in Redland Saturday evening. Those present were friends and relatives from Oswego, the Hallinan’s former home. (Oregon City Banner-Courier, March 30, 1922)

Sixteen friends and relatives pleasantly surprised Earl Goodrich last evening at his home 619 Comstock street, the occasion being in honor of his 22nd birthday anniversary. The evening was spent informally and later light refreshments were served. (Adrian Daily Telegram, June 9, 1922)

Miss Gertrude Walling, employed by the Suddon-Christenson lumber company, spent the weekend with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Walling near Salem, returning to Portland Monday. (Salem Capital Journal, July 5, 1922)

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Dougherty returned last week from a visit to their daughter, Mrs. Mark Pomeroy. (Caldwell Tribune, November 10, 1922)

Zelma Bean of the fifth grade wrote a burlesque on “Tom Sawyer,” characterizing herself as Mischievous Tom. J.K. Gill & Co. presented Zelma with the book, “Kathrinka” for producing one of the best writings in the “Magic Wish Contest.” (Oregon Daily Journal, November 26, 1922)

Zelma Bean, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Bean, No. 133 Olympia street, is the smallest child who received a prize in the recent magic wish contest conducted by the J.K. Gill company. The prize, which is a $2 book, was presented to her with the others at the main library on Saturday night. Zelma selected as her subject “Tom Sawyer,” and by the rules of the contest she imagined she was the character and made her wishes accordingly. (Oregon Daily Journal, November 26, 1922)