Short News Items from 1935

A birthday dinner in honor of Mrs. Mabel Briner was given at her home, February 20. Guests were: Mr. and Mrs. C.A. McGrew, Mrs. Ella Mae McGrew, Mr. and Mrs. Lyle Briner and daughter, Rose Elfa, Mrs. Elfa Green, and a sister of Mrs. Briner who is visiting from Portland. (Medford Mail Tribune, February 22, 1935)

Fort Klamath, Ore.—Mr. and Mrs. Fred Loosley left Wednesday for Merrill, where they will spend some time visiting their son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. John Zbinden. (Klamath Falls Evening Herald, November 13, 1935)

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs. Duane Baldwin and Mr. and Mrs. Earl Baldwin’s son of Tecumseh, Michigan, left Sunday for northern Michigan on a deer hunting expedition. (Livingston County Daily Press, November 20, 1935)

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Short News Items from 1932

Mr. and Mrs. M.W. McGrew and family of the Klamath Junction, accompanied by C.A. McGrew spent last Sunday afternoon at the home of Mr. and Mrs. G.A. Briner. (Medford Mail Tribune, February 12, 1932)

Mrs. J.L. Shauger is ill in the home of her son Joseph Isaacson at 226 Ormsby Street. (Adrian Daily Telegram, April 7, 1932)

Mr. and Mrs. William Brightman, four Prospect street, have returned home after spending their vacation in Asbury Park. (Middletown Times Herald, August 20, 1932)

Zelora Armstrong and a Mr. Quinn, Des Moines, came Saturday for the pheasant hunting, and Mrs. J.A. Armstrong accompanied them to Stephen Sharp’s, where the men hunted. The visitors spent Saturday afternoon at J.A. Armstrong’s, returning to Des Moines Sunday. (Kossuth County Advance, November 24, 1932)

Short News Items from 1927

Lucien Mueller left Tuesday for Ithaca, N.Y., where he will attend the graduation exercises of his brother, Clarence, and also the ten year reunion of his class at Cornell university. Mr. Mueller will return to Decatur June 27. (Decatur Herald, June 8, 1927)

Mr. and Mrs. John Toews had as their guests on Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. Preston of Grande Ronde, Mr. and Mrs. John Harris of Garibaldi, and J.S. Hiatt who is working at Blodgett. On Monday a granddaughter, Mrs. W.C. Harris and small son of Fresno, California, arrived for a visit with Mr. and Mrs. Toews. (Salem Statesman Journal, June 23, 1927)

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Short News Items from 1913

Alvin Holmes, of Mt. Zion, who suffered a stroke of paralysis a week ago, is still in a serious condition. (Wilkes-Barre Evening News, February 25, 1913)

Among the special numbers on the amateur program at the Globe theatre last night, was the “One-Man Band, and this feature certainly outstripped anything in the class secured by the Globe management for several weeks. Harry Walling, an enterprising and jovial citizen of South Salem, took the part of the solitary band and his efforts were highly appreciated by the enthusiastic audience. Mr. Walling crowded music out of about every conceivable interest known and his execution was perfect. (Eugene Daily Capital Journal, March 14, 1913)

Mr. and Mrs. Lorin Walling and baby are visiting their parents here, having had the misfortune to have their house and all its contents burned at Gates Wednesday morning. The missionary societies are helping them by sewing. (Polk County Observer, April 25, 1913)

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Short News Items from 1893

Andrew Briner and family left yesterday for their future home at Ashland. He has been the blacksmith at Perrydale for several years. (Oregon Statesman, January 13, 1893)

G.A. Briner, the late blacksmith at Perrydale, is now located with his family at Talent, in Jackson county. (Oregon Statesman, February 17, 1893)

Clifford Ball, a postal clerk on the Northern Pacific, has been visiting his mother at Monmouth this week. (Oregon Statesman, June 16, 1893)

Business & Professional Notices from 1888

Newton, N.Y. [sic], Feb. 3 — The case of Robert Westbrook, charged with the murder of Dennis J. Morris, was given to the jury at 4 o’clock today. Mr. Kallisch summed up for the defendant in an argument of three hours to his client’s innocence, and Capt. Van Blarcom, in a speech of two hours, insisted on a verdict of murder in the first degree. Judge Magie reviewed the evidence at great length, the charge being thought unfavorable to the prisoner. Several exceptions were taken by the defense. After five hours the jury rendered a verdict of not guilty. Westbrook rose, threw up his hat, and, with a shout “I am free,” fell weeping on the neck of his sobbing wife. (New York Times, February 4, 1888)

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Wagon Creek Items (Excerpt)

G.A. Briner received a painful injury Friday, while logging near his mill. He was in the act of barking a log when a glancing blow from the ax caused a small knot to strike him in the right eye.  Dr. Hart was called. He gave Mr. Briner every hope that he will not lose the sight of it.

Source:  Ashland Tidings, October 13, 1913.

Longer Stems

Continuing the mythical contest for the longest-stemmed flowers, Mrs. G.A. Briner of Wagner creek, sent to the Mail Tribune office 11 narcissis [sic] blooms with stems all measuring more than 28½ inches. The longest was 31¾ inches. Also on display were several variegated tulips with the longest stem measuring 37½ inches.

Source: Medford Mail Tribune, May 2, 1941.