Death of Mrs. Walling

Mrs. Mary J. Walling, widow of the late A.G. Walling, a pioneer printer, died early yesterday morning at her residence, 381 Front street. Mrs. Walling had been an invalid for over a year, and death came as a result of heart disease and complications.

Source: Portland Oregonian, December 16, 1900.

Untitled (David G. Rorick)

The sad intelligence of the death of D.G. Rorick was received from San Bernardino yesterday. Mr. Rorick who was conductor of the San Jacinto train, left his post of duty just a week ago yesterday, and in company with his wife went to Arrowhead to recuperate, being in ill-health. He seemed threated with pneumonia, but word has been received that he died at about 5 o’clock yesterday morning of neuralgia of the brain. Mr. Rorick was of a genial disposition and kindly heart, and it seems almost incredible that one who appeared so strong and well but a week ago should be thus suddenly stricken down. Mr. Rorick has been connected with the San Jacinto run for a great many years. He leaves a wife to mourn his untimely taking off. The funeral will take place in San Bernardino.

Source: Riverside Press and Horticulturist, March 31, 1900.

Mr. Z.E. Brown Reported Dying

The above person is a relative of Dr. and J.D. Witter, of this city. Two years ago he was in this city the guest of Dr. Witter and received great help from his treatment. The following about his condition is taken from the St. Paul Pioneer Press:—A telegram has been received from Los Angeles, Cal., stating that Zelora E. Brown, the well known real estate agent and former partner of H.O. Hamlin, was in a dying condition. In response to this sad message Mrs. Brown and her son left yesterday for California. During the major portion of last summer Mr. Brown had suffered much from bilious disorders, and left for the Pacific coast early in the winter in the hope that a change of climate would prove beneficial. It appears, however, that the disease continued to make rapid progress, and all remedial objects proved unavailing. Prior to engaging in the real estate business Mr. Brown had been a commercial traveler, and was very generally and favorably known throughout the state. Personally he was esteemed by all with whom he came in contact, and the unfavorable report in regard to his condition will create deep regret in his extended circle of acquaintances.

Later—Mr. Brown died in Los Angeles, Wednesday last.

Source: Wood County Reporter, February 2, 1888.

A Child’s Death

Harry Van Sickle, aged three months, child of John E. Van Sickle of this village, died Tuesday night at about 10 o’clock of cholera infantum. The funeral will take place Thursday afternoon at 2:30 from the house.

Source: Port Jervis Evening Gazette, August 10, 1881.

P.F. Cawley, Aged 83, Fayette Merchant Dead

FAYETTE, O., Oct. 23.—P.F. Cawley, 83 years old, died this morning at home after an illness of several months. He had been a resident of this place for many years and was senior member of the dry goods firm of Fish & Cawley. He leaves one son Herbert and a daughter Helen. The funeral service will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the home on North Main street.

Source: Adrian Daily Telegram, October 23, 1919.

Killed By His Horse

Jesse D. Walling, an old and respected citizen of Polk county, was killed by his horse running over him, on the 9th inst. Following is Statesman’s account:

It appears that we out on the roads, as Supervisor, working a party of men. About three o’clock yesterday afternoon, his saddle horse, a young animal, got loose and started to run along the road. Mr. Walling rain in front to stop him, but the animal dashed straight on, striking him in the face and throwing him back against a log with great force. The back of his struck a knot which penetrated the skull and he never spoke again. He was picked up, breathing, but insensible, and carried home while a physician was hastily summoned, but before Dr. Grubbs, who had been called, reached the place the old gentleman was dead. He was an old settler of Oregon, an enterprising citizen, good neighbor, kind friend, and leaves a large family to mourn his sudden loss. They have the sympathizes of a host of friends, for all remember “Uncle Jesse” as a man of kind words and noble deed. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and no doubt the funeral will be under the auspices of the order.

Source: Albany Register, May 14, 1870.

Untitled (Jesse D. Walling)

Jesse Walling, of Polk county, was last Tuesday killed under the following distressing circumstances, as detailed by the Statesman:

It appears that we out on the roads, as Supervisor, working a party of men. About three o’clock yesterday afternoon, his saddle horse, a young animal, got loose and started to run along the road. Mr. Walling rain in front to stop him, but the animal dashed straight on, striking him in the face and throwing him back against a log with great force. The back of his struck a knot which penetrated the skull and he never spoke again. He was picked up, breathing, but insensible, and carried home while a physician was hastily summoned, but before Dr. Grubbs, who had been called, reached the place the old gentleman was dead. He was an old settler of Oregon, an enterprising citizen, good neighbor, kind friend, and leaves a large family to mourn his sudden loss. They have the sympathizes of a host of friends, for all remember “Uncle Jesse” as a man of kind words and noble deed. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and no doubt the funeral will be under the auspices of the order.

Source: Albany State Rights Democrat, May 13, 1870.

Mrs. R. Adams Is Dead At Lapeer

Was Cousin of Late Ross Grover and Well-Known in Flint.

Lapeer, Mich., March 9.—Mrs. Reedly Adams died at her home here yesterday after an illness of one year.  She leaves her husband; one son, Richard Adams of this city; one sister, Mrs. L.H. Post of Kane; and one brother, Nelson Groover of the Canadian Expeditionary Force. 

Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 2:30 from her late home.

Mrs. Adams was a cousin of Ross Groover of Flint, who, with his two children, died within the last three weeks.

Source:  Flint Journal, March 9, 1918.

Third Member Of Groover Family Taken By Death

Robert H. Groover, five-year-old son of Mrs. Ross D. Groover of 306 East Ninth street, is dead of scarlet fever complicated with pneumonia, the third member of this family to succumb to this malady within three weeks.  An older brother, Gerald, aged eight years, died on February 12, followed by the death of the father, Ross D. Groover, on February 18.  Besides his mother, the boy leaves two brothers, Jack D. and Charles E., all at home.

Source:  Flint Journal, March 5, 1918.

Ross D. Groover Taken By Death

Passed Away Within Week of Young Son, Scarlet Fever Victim

Ross D. Groover, an embalmer at the Dodds-Dumanois company, died at his home, 306 East Ninth street, last night at 11 o’clock following an illness of four weeks of grip and scarlet fever, the latter being the direct cause of his death.

Mr. Groover was the son of Charles Groover of this city and was born in Metamora, Mich., August 20, 1886.  Previous to coming to Flint 11 years ago, he lived in Lapeer for two years going there from Metamora.  He was married to Miss Blanche Hicks of Flint, August 21, 1907.  He had been employed by the Dodds-Dumanois company for the last two years.  He was a member of the Protected Home Circle.

Besides his wife he leaves three sons, Robert H., Jack D., and Charles E. Groover, all at home, and his father. Gerald Groover, an eight-year-old son, died a week ago today of scarlet fever.

A short service was conducted by Rev. H.A. Field in Grace Lawn chapel this afternoon.  Burial was made in Grace Lawn cemetery.

Source:  Flint Journal, February 19, 1918.