Obituary

Sylvester King Porter was born in Seneca Township, Lenawee county, Michigan, July 8th., 1847 and died February 3rd., 1929 in South Pasadena, California.

He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. John C. Porter, pioneers of the section in which he was born and where he spent the greater part of his life as a successful farmer.

In 1868 he was married to Miss Melissa Rorick, and the families of Porter and Rorick entered into further matrimonial alliances when his sisters, Miss Mary and Miss Harriet, became the wives of Mr. Mark Rorick and Mr. Roy Rorick respectively. These brothers were cousins of Mrs. S.K. Porter.

During the progress of the efforts of Mr. and Mrs. Porter to establish a status of financial independence, they settled on what is now known as the Porter farm, near Packard Station. It was here that the Porter family consisting of the seniors, Mr. and Mrs. John C. Porter, Mr. and Mrs. S.K. Porter and daughter Annah [sic] Louise, became and important factor in the social and civic development of this community. Under the ownership and management of the son, Sylvester (or Vet, as he was familiarly known, his well kept farm became one of the county landmarks.

The Farm Home, a white house with its green blinds, through the supervision and industry of his wife, achieved for itself a reputation for its home comforts and a cordial atmosphere of hospitality.

It was here that the venerable father, John C. Porter, died, and the daughter Louise was married to Mr. George A. [sic] Milne.

With philosophical resignation to their ageing and lessening powers of endurance, Mr. and Mrs. Porter decided to leave the location which had been the scene of their life’s strenuous activities, and moved to East Main street in Morenci, where the family circle, now reduced to three members, was still blessed by the presence of the paternal mother, Louisa King Porter, who continued to live with them until her death in 1913.

During their residence in Morenci, Mr. Porter served as Vice President of the First National Bank and as a man was well known for his affability and the genial qualities of a reminiscent talker and a charitable nature.

When in 1920 the Porters took their departure for California it occasioned great regret on the part of their Morenci neighbors and many friends. These friendships proved of the enduring type and the two occasions of the return of the Porters to Michigan have featured many pleasant reunions.

During their sojourn in California, the Porters have lived with Mrs. Porter’s sister, Dr. Rorick Bennett and her daughter, Mrs. Georgie R. Clark. By this combined household, eastern friends have often been hospitably entertained at 1931 Marengo Ave., S. Pasadena, Cal.

It was here during a season of family reunion and plans which anticipated the coming visit of his daughter, that Mr. Porter was suddenly and mortally stricken with cardiac asthma early Sunday mornin [sic], February third, in South Pasadena.

The funeral which was held in South Pasadena, Saturday, February 9th., was attended by many friends and relatives, among the latter being the daughter, Mrs. George H. Milne, of New York City, and Mrs. A.V. Porter [sic] and daughter, Cordelia, of Toledo, O. The body will later be brought to Morenci for burial in Oak Grove cemetery.

He is survived by his wife, now living in South Pasadena, and a daughter and one granddaughter in New York City, and a sister who resides in Morenci.

His memory will also be affectionately cherished by his younger relatives who regard with superlative regret the gradual passing of the beloved generation to which he belonged.

Source: Morenci Observer, February 14, 1929.

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