Lewis Van Blarcom

Lewis, eldest son of William Van Blarcom, was born in Sparta township, July 19, 1835. His early education was obtained at the common school in his native township, and under the private instruction of Edward A. Stiles, a well-known teacher of Wantage.

His minority was spent mostly at home, where he became inured to farm work, and learned the inestimable lessons of self-reliance and perseverance. After reach the proper age he was a teacher for four terms.

In 1858 he began to read law with M.R. Kimble, of Hamburg, and after one year entered the law offices of John Linn, of Newton.

On Aug. 25, 1862, Mr. Van Blarcom enlisted as first lieutenant, Company D, Fifteenth Regiment New Jersey Volunteers, and for meritorious service was promoted in June, 1863, to captain of Company C. This regiment was part of the First New Jersey Brigade, which formed a part of the Army of the Potomac, First Division, Sixth Army Corps.

Capt. Van Blarcom was in the following engagements: Fredericksburg, December 1862; second Fredericksburg, at Salem Heights, May 1863; Gettysburg, Jul 1863; Rappahanock Station, November 1863; Spottsylvania, May 8, 1864.

In this last engagement, he was wounded and captured by the rebels, and had his leg amputated by them. After remaining in the hospital for ten days, he was carried to Richmond and placed in Libby Prison, where he remained until Sept. 12, 1864, when he was exchanged and placed in the hospital at Annapolis. He received his discharge from service on Dec. 19, 1864, and returned home.

After his admission as an attorney he began the practice of law in Newton, where he has successfully practiced his profession since. From 1869 to 1873, Joseph Coult was associated with him in business, and from 1873 to 1880, Lewis Cochran. He was appointed prosecutor of pleas by Governor Randolph, March 25, 1869, and discharged the duties of that office with acknowledged ability and justice for a term of five years.

Capt. Van Blarcom is, politically, a Republican, and leading and influential in his party in Sussex County.

Upon his return from the war in the fall of 1864 he was the Republican candidate for county clerk, but failed of election on account of his party being largely in the minority.

For two years he was one of the chosen board of freeholders, and he has been chairman of the Republican county committee for the past eight years.

He married, Aug. 17, 1871, Mary, daughter of Alexander H. Thompson [sic], of Marksborough, Warren Co., N.J. His children are Kate and Andrew.

Source: Snell, James P. 1881. History of Sussex and Warren Counties, New Jersey. Philadelphia: Everts & Peck.

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